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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, September 15, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, September 15, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#201] Building Babel The film follows a year in the life of Sharif El-Gamal, developer of the so-called "Ground Zero Mosque," a Muslim-led community center two blocks from the World Trade Center. With unlimited access to his home and office, the film paints a portrait of a Muslim-American businessman up against impossible odds. A passionate Brooklyn-born Muslim, Sharif El-Gamal sees Park51 as a centerpiece of his own Muslim American identity. Born of a Polish-Catholic mother and Egyptian-Muslim father, El-Gamal only turned to Islam after 9/11 shook his faith to the core, and sees Park51 as a way to give back to the Lower Manhattan community. Married to a Muslim convert and the father of two daughters, Sharif represents an Islam that remains foreign to most Americans, especially given the way the media and politicians have continued to use Park51 as a point of controversy. Despite a principle goal of helping to rebuild Lower Manhattan, opposition to the plan has been virulent and non-stop. Thousands of Americans have rallied against the prospect of a Muslim institution being constructed in such proximity to Ground Zero, and Park51 has become an internationally discussed symbol of Islam's relationship to the Western world. Building Babel follows Park51?s development through the daily experiences and struggles of the men and women trying to make it a reality. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Global Voices [#422] A Son's Sacrifice Imran, a young Muslim American, struggles to take over his father's neighborhood halal slaughterhouse in New York City. duration 25:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#203] Solving The Economic Puzzle One day the employment rate and stock market are up, and the next they are down. On the third episode of The Aspen Institute Presents, Solving the Economic Puzzle focuses on the creation of jobs in conventional and creative ways in the abstract and not-so-abstract concept of economy. Host Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour attends the conversation on The Challenge of Building American Jobs with professor Austan Goolsbee, former U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao, "Behind the Kitchen Door" author Saru Jayaraman, editor-in-chief Kevin J. Delaney of Quartz and American Action Forum's president Douglas Holtz-Eakin. Also, Walter Isaacson of The Aspen Institute speaks with Kickstarter founder Perry Chen in Kickstarter and the Economics of Creativity to discuss the project, and its effects on the creative field and "starving artists." duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#236H] The Collision of Sports and Politics On occasion, a sports story breaks free from the sports section - as highlighted by this week's Time magazine cover story, "It's Time to Pay College Athletes". These headlines are less about the latest star or the final score and more about culture, politics, and who we hope to be as Americans. Should we build flashy new arenas in bankrupt cities? Do we cheer from the stands or cringe as we watch our children butt heads on the football field, risking a future of potential brain trauma?
    This week Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation - the magazine's first sports editor in the publication's 148 year history - joins Bill Moyers to talk about the collision of sports and politics. As Zirin points out, "there's always so much happening in the world of sports, and there's always so many different ways in which sports, not just reflects our lives, but actually shapes our lives - shapes our understanding of things like racism, sexism, homophobia. It shapes our understanding of our country, of corporations and what's happening to our cities. In so many different ways, sports stories are stories of American life in the 21st century."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5311H] It has been a whirlwind week for developments surrounding President Obama's attempts to take action against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad for alleged chemical weapons attacks in that 2-year civil war. What looked like a potential military strike at the beginning of the week now seems to have turned into a diplomatic dance involving Syria, Russia, the US and the United Nations. All this comes after a full court press by President Obama to garner support for military action; Assad's hour-long interview on PBS; and Russia President Vladimir Putin chastising the US in a New York Times Op-Ed.
    Joining Gwen Ifill for perspective and analysis are: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Martha Raddatz of ABC News, Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post, and James Kitfield of National Journal.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3138] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#109H] This week: Leon Panetta, former Secretary of Defense discusses Syria; Charlie recounts his trip to Syria to interview President Assad; US Open winner Rafael Nadal; and we look at the Whitney Museum's "Hopper Drawing," the first major museum exhibition to focus on the drawings of Edward Hopper. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2522H] 1. The Syrian dilemma, Putin to the rescue?
    2. If Putin is faking, what then?
    3. Congress, the President and the crisis in Syria.
    4. Are the President and his Secretary of State on the same page rhetorically?
    5. The continuing drive to defund Obamacare and the threat of a government shutdown.
    6. The surprising finish to the New York Democratic Mayoral Primary.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#201] Building Babel The film follows a year in the life of Sharif El-Gamal, developer of the so-called "Ground Zero Mosque," a Muslim-led community center two blocks from the World Trade Center. With unlimited access to his home and office, the film paints a portrait of a Muslim-American businessman up against impossible odds. A passionate Brooklyn-born Muslim, Sharif El-Gamal sees Park51 as a centerpiece of his own Muslim American identity. Born of a Polish-Catholic mother and Egyptian-Muslim father, El-Gamal only turned to Islam after 9/11 shook his faith to the core, and sees Park51 as a way to give back to the Lower Manhattan community. Married to a Muslim convert and the father of two daughters, Sharif represents an Islam that remains foreign to most Americans, especially given the way the media and politicians have continued to use Park51 as a point of controversy. Despite a principle goal of helping to rebuild Lower Manhattan, opposition to the plan has been virulent and non-stop. Thousands of Americans have rallied against the prospect of a Muslim institution being constructed in such proximity to Ground Zero, and Park51 has become an internationally discussed symbol of Islam's relationship to the Western world. Building Babel follows Park51?s development through the daily experiences and struggles of the men and women trying to make it a reality. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#304H] The Physics of Baseball/World's Most Powerful Microscope When it comes to curve balls and line drives, it all comes down to a physics lesson. And check out the world's most powerful microscope in Berkeley, which is seeking out images of individual atoms. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1702] THE SYRIA CONFLICT - Can diplomacy replace missile strikes in the crisis over chemical weapons in Syria? William Galston, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, talks with Bob Abernethy and Kim Lawton about the moral choices now as the US decides how to proceed.
    BIRMINGHAM CHURCH BOMBING 50TH ANNIVERSARY - Less than 3 weeks after the 1963 March on Washington, on Sunday, September 15th, a Ku Klux Klan-planted bomb went off at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham Alabama, just before the 11 am worship service began. 4 young girls were killed, and the entire nation was rocked by the tragedy. Kim Lawton looks at the impact of the bombing and how, 50 years later, the church hopes to be a witness of the past and a sign of hope for the future.
    KEVER AVOT - Rabbi David Wolpe, of Sinai Temple in Los Angeles, talks about the Jewish practice, Kever Avot. During the days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur - a time of prayer, repentance and charity - many Jews visit the graves of their loved ones and ancestors. Rabbi Wolpe leads a community Kever Avot service at Mt. Sinai Hollywood Hills Memorial Park.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1012] Macro Matters This week's WT features a TV first with a new macro research team. Cornerstone Macro's top-ranked economist Nancy Lazar and investment strategist Francois Trahan on the big trends they see that will move markets. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#302H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman offers a life preserver to a homeowner who is underwater on her mortgage. Ric also provides financial basic training to troops at Fort Belvoir. And Avi Reichental, an expert in 3D printing drafts a blueprint on how consumers and investors can take advantage of this cutting edge technology. Jean Edelman shows us that while money can't buy happiness, finding joy in the little things can be priceless. All that and much more on this episode of Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2522H] 1. The Syrian dilemma, Putin to the rescue?
    2. If Putin is faking, what then?
    3. Congress, the President and the crisis in Syria.
    4. Are the President and his Secretary of State on the same page rhetorically?
    5. The continuing drive to defund Obamacare and the threat of a government shutdown.
    6. The surprising finish to the New York Democratic Mayoral Primary.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3138] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5311H] It has been a whirlwind week for developments surrounding President Obama's attempts to take action against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad for alleged chemical weapons attacks in that 2-year civil war. What looked like a potential military strike at the beginning of the week now seems to have turned into a diplomatic dance involving Syria, Russia, the US and the United Nations. All this comes after a full court press by President Obama to garner support for military action; Assad's hour-long interview on PBS; and Russia President Vladimir Putin chastising the US in a New York Times Op-Ed.
    Joining Gwen Ifill for perspective and analysis are: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Martha Raddatz of ABC News, Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post, and James Kitfield of National Journal.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2443H] September 13, 2013 Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    LEGISLATIVE ROUNDUP - Lawmakers in Sacramento spent the week scrambling to get through about 400 bills before the end of the legislative session on Friday. Among the most notable is the governor's $315 million plan to ease prison crowding due to a federal court order. Also on the table were bills increasing the minimum wage, expanding immigrant rights, reducing penalties for drug possession and tighter restrictions on guns. The closely watched bill to regulate fracking was criticized by environmental groups, who say it doesn't go far enough.
    NSA SECRECY CHALLENGED - Amidst continuing concerns about their role in NSA surveillance programs, internet giants including Google and Microsoft are challenging the secrecy that surrounds the surveillance orders they receive. Yahoo and Facebook have joined Google and Microsoft in filing lawsuits at the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, seeking permission to disclose more information about their participation in the NSA's data gathering efforts.
    ELDER ABUSE - An investigation of the California Department of Public Health reveals that the agency is failing to pursue cases of alleged abuse against some of the state's most vulnerable people, including elderly patients receiving in-home care or living in nursing homes. Instead, the agency is quietly and quickly closing cases after only minimal investigation.
    Guests: Scott Detrow, KQED News; Michelle Quinn, Politico, and Mina Kim, KQED News
    BAY AREA FALL ARTS PREVIEW - The Bay Area fall arts calendar is jam-packed with anniversaries, big name acts, and world premieres. KQED reporter Cy Musiker, host of "The Do-List," reveals his top picks for the best in music, dance, theatre and more.
    duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#236H] The Collision of Sports and Politics On occasion, a sports story breaks free from the sports section - as highlighted by this week's Time magazine cover story, "It's Time to Pay College Athletes". These headlines are less about the latest star or the final score and more about culture, politics, and who we hope to be as Americans. Should we build flashy new arenas in bankrupt cities? Do we cheer from the stands or cringe as we watch our children butt heads on the football field, risking a future of potential brain trauma?
    This week Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation - the magazine's first sports editor in the publication's 148 year history - joins Bill Moyers to talk about the collision of sports and politics. As Zirin points out, "there's always so much happening in the world of sports, and there's always so many different ways in which sports, not just reflects our lives, but actually shapes our lives - shapes our understanding of things like racism, sexism, homophobia. It shapes our understanding of our country, of corporations and what's happening to our cities. In so many different ways, sports stories are stories of American life in the 21st century."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2522H] 1. The Syrian dilemma, Putin to the rescue?
    2. If Putin is faking, what then?
    3. Congress, the President and the crisis in Syria.
    4. Are the President and his Secretary of State on the same page rhetorically?
    5. The continuing drive to defund Obamacare and the threat of a government shutdown.
    6. The surprising finish to the New York Democratic Mayoral Primary.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3138] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2227H] Judicial Systems Fail Rape Victims * Secondhand Adoption Online * Behind the Headlines: the Benefits of Being an Only Child.
    Panelists: Voto Latino Executive Director Maria Teresa Kumar, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy, National Network to End Domestic Violence President Kim Gandy, Republican Strategist Rina Shah.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#212] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#304H] The Physics of Baseball/World's Most Powerful Microscope When it comes to curve balls and line drives, it all comes down to a physics lesson. And check out the world's most powerful microscope in Berkeley, which is seeking out images of individual atoms. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#109H] This week: Leon Panetta, former Secretary of Defense discusses Syria; Charlie recounts his trip to Syria to interview President Assad; US Open winner Rafael Nadal; and we look at the Whitney Museum's "Hopper Drawing," the first major museum exhibition to focus on the drawings of Edward Hopper. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2443H] September 13, 2013 Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    LEGISLATIVE ROUNDUP - Lawmakers in Sacramento spent the week scrambling to get through about 400 bills before the end of the legislative session on Friday. Among the most notable is the governor's $315 million plan to ease prison crowding due to a federal court order. Also on the table were bills increasing the minimum wage, expanding immigrant rights, reducing penalties for drug possession and tighter restrictions on guns. The closely watched bill to regulate fracking was criticized by environmental groups, who say it doesn't go far enough.
    NSA SECRECY CHALLENGED - Amidst continuing concerns about their role in NSA surveillance programs, internet giants including Google and Microsoft are challenging the secrecy that surrounds the surveillance orders they receive. Yahoo and Facebook have joined Google and Microsoft in filing lawsuits at the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, seeking permission to disclose more information about their participation in the NSA's data gathering efforts.
    ELDER ABUSE - An investigation of the California Department of Public Health reveals that the agency is failing to pursue cases of alleged abuse against some of the state's most vulnerable people, including elderly patients receiving in-home care or living in nursing homes. Instead, the agency is quietly and quickly closing cases after only minimal investigation.
    Guests: Scott Detrow, KQED News; Michelle Quinn, Politico, and Mina Kim, KQED News
    BAY AREA FALL ARTS PREVIEW - The Bay Area fall arts calendar is jam-packed with anniversaries, big name acts, and world premieres. KQED reporter Cy Musiker, host of "The Do-List," reveals his top picks for the best in music, dance, theatre and more.
    duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3138] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5311H] It has been a whirlwind week for developments surrounding President Obama's attempts to take action against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad for alleged chemical weapons attacks in that 2-year civil war. What looked like a potential military strike at the beginning of the week now seems to have turned into a diplomatic dance involving Syria, Russia, the US and the United Nations. All this comes after a full court press by President Obama to garner support for military action; Assad's hour-long interview on PBS; and Russia President Vladimir Putin chastising the US in a New York Times Op-Ed.
    Joining Gwen Ifill for perspective and analysis are: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Martha Raddatz of ABC News, Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post, and James Kitfield of National Journal.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#236H] The Collision of Sports and Politics On occasion, a sports story breaks free from the sports section - as highlighted by this week's Time magazine cover story, "It's Time to Pay College Athletes". These headlines are less about the latest star or the final score and more about culture, politics, and who we hope to be as Americans. Should we build flashy new arenas in bankrupt cities? Do we cheer from the stands or cringe as we watch our children butt heads on the football field, risking a future of potential brain trauma?
    This week Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation - the magazine's first sports editor in the publication's 148 year history - joins Bill Moyers to talk about the collision of sports and politics. As Zirin points out, "there's always so much happening in the world of sports, and there's always so many different ways in which sports, not just reflects our lives, but actually shapes our lives - shapes our understanding of things like racism, sexism, homophobia. It shapes our understanding of our country, of corporations and what's happening to our cities. In so many different ways, sports stories are stories of American life in the 21st century."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#104H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2443H] September 13, 2013 Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    LEGISLATIVE ROUNDUP - Lawmakers in Sacramento spent the week scrambling to get through about 400 bills before the end of the legislative session on Friday. Among the most notable is the governor's $315 million plan to ease prison crowding due to a federal court order. Also on the table were bills increasing the minimum wage, expanding immigrant rights, reducing penalties for drug possession and tighter restrictions on guns. The closely watched bill to regulate fracking was criticized by environmental groups, who say it doesn't go far enough.
    NSA SECRECY CHALLENGED - Amidst continuing concerns about their role in NSA surveillance programs, internet giants including Google and Microsoft are challenging the secrecy that surrounds the surveillance orders they receive. Yahoo and Facebook have joined Google and Microsoft in filing lawsuits at the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, seeking permission to disclose more information about their participation in the NSA's data gathering efforts.
    ELDER ABUSE - An investigation of the California Department of Public Health reveals that the agency is failing to pursue cases of alleged abuse against some of the state's most vulnerable people, including elderly patients receiving in-home care or living in nursing homes. Instead, the agency is quietly and quickly closing cases after only minimal investigation.
    Guests: Scott Detrow, KQED News; Michelle Quinn, Politico, and Mina Kim, KQED News
    BAY AREA FALL ARTS PREVIEW - The Bay Area fall arts calendar is jam-packed with anniversaries, big name acts, and world premieres. KQED reporter Cy Musiker, host of "The Do-List," reveals his top picks for the best in music, dance, theatre and more.
    duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#212H] Elon Musk and Alison Van Diggelen Meet Pay Pal? cofounder Elon Musk. The man who helped transform the online retail experience now has set his sights on electric cars and space transport as the CEO of Tesla Motors and Space X. Alison van Diggelen of Fresh Dialogues moderates a riveting conversation with the Renaissance man. duration 53:13   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#236H] The Collision of Sports and Politics On occasion, a sports story breaks free from the sports section - as highlighted by this week's Time magazine cover story, "It's Time to Pay College Athletes". These headlines are less about the latest star or the final score and more about culture, politics, and who we hope to be as Americans. Should we build flashy new arenas in bankrupt cities? Do we cheer from the stands or cringe as we watch our children butt heads on the football field, risking a future of potential brain trauma?
    This week Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation - the magazine's first sports editor in the publication's 148 year history - joins Bill Moyers to talk about the collision of sports and politics. As Zirin points out, "there's always so much happening in the world of sports, and there's always so many different ways in which sports, not just reflects our lives, but actually shapes our lives - shapes our understanding of things like racism, sexism, homophobia. It shapes our understanding of our country, of corporations and what's happening to our cities. In so many different ways, sports stories are stories of American life in the 21st century."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#201] Building Babel The film follows a year in the life of Sharif El-Gamal, developer of the so-called "Ground Zero Mosque," a Muslim-led community center two blocks from the World Trade Center. With unlimited access to his home and office, the film paints a portrait of a Muslim-American businessman up against impossible odds. A passionate Brooklyn-born Muslim, Sharif El-Gamal sees Park51 as a centerpiece of his own Muslim American identity. Born of a Polish-Catholic mother and Egyptian-Muslim father, El-Gamal only turned to Islam after 9/11 shook his faith to the core, and sees Park51 as a way to give back to the Lower Manhattan community. Married to a Muslim convert and the father of two daughters, Sharif represents an Islam that remains foreign to most Americans, especially given the way the media and politicians have continued to use Park51 as a point of controversy. Despite a principle goal of helping to rebuild Lower Manhattan, opposition to the plan has been virulent and non-stop. Thousands of Americans have rallied against the prospect of a Muslim institution being constructed in such proximity to Ground Zero, and Park51 has become an internationally discussed symbol of Islam's relationship to the Western world. Building Babel follows Park51?s development through the daily experiences and struggles of the men and women trying to make it a reality. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    After The Harvest: Fighting Hunger in the Coffeelands Coffee farmers in Chiapas, Mexico greet the rainy months between May and September with a mix of hope and trepidation. Consistent rainfall is vital to their crops, but too much water makes their rural dirt roads impassable. The price of beans and corn goes up, just when income from the coffee harvest is depleted. These are "los mesesflacos," or the thin months, when families make ends meet by eating less, eating cheaper foods, or borrowing against their future. In 2010, the Optic Nerve Productions crew traveled from Mexico to Nicaragua with the help of The Coffee Trust to capture the stories of coffee farmers' struggle with seasonal hunger. Food insecurity is a well-established, annual "season" in coffee-growing communities, yet the problem is widely unknown within the specialty coffee industry. . While seasonal hunger is an incredibly complex problem, recent work suggests it is not unsolvable. "After the Harvest: Fighting Hunger in the Coffeelands" is a short film that brings the day-to-day challenges of the thin months to life in the voices of coffee farmers themselves, and shares the successes of creative projects that have been established to eliminate this annual period of food insecurity. duration 21:02   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#612] Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai tells the story of Kenya's Green Belt Movement and follows Maathai, the movement's founder and the first environmentalist and African woman to win the Nobel Prize. Using archival footage and first-person accounts, the film documents dramatic political confrontations of 1980s and 1990s Kenya and captures Maathai's infectious determination and unwavering courage through in-depth conversations with the film's subjects. duration 55:01   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#324] The Last Tightrope Dancer In Armenia Zhora (76 years old) and Knyaz (77 years old) were once the most celebrated masters of tightrope dancing in Armenia. Today, they are the only surviving performers who can keep this ancient art alive against the current of contemporary society. Having been bitter rivals throughout their lives, a common objective has finally brought them together: to train the only student of tightrope dancing left in the country. Hovsep, a 16-year-old orphan boy, has to decide whether or not to accept the role of the last tightrope dancer in Armenia, in a society that has abandoned both him and the art of tightrope dancing. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, September 15, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too