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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Sunday, September 8, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, September 8, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#126] Follow The Leader A political coming-of-age documentary about three boys who want to be President. Over three life-changing years, each rethinks his beliefs and discovers who he truly wants to be as an adult. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Aspen Institute Presents [#202] American People and American Politics What does it mean to be an American today? The Aspen Institute Presents: People, American Politics questions the current state of politics as the country's politicians and citizens remain divided on issues, including gun control, immigration and national security. Host Hari Sreenivasan (PBS NewsHour) looks at compelling political sessions at the 2013 Aspen Ideas Festival from citizenship led by writer Eric Liu to the Republican Party with Karl Rove to the 2008 and 2012 elections with Nate Silver and Katie Couric. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#235H] What Are We Doing In Syria? With the probability of American intervention, Syria is everywhere in the news. This week Phil Donahue, filling in for Bill Moyers, speaks with NPR Middle East correspondent Deborah Amos and historian and Vietnam veteran Andrew Bacevich about the possible repercussions of our actions in the Middle East.
    As he has so often in recent years, historian and analyst Andrew Bacevich is asking the important questions about America's role in the world and specifically why we should go into Syria. Is a military response justified and if we take action, where does it stop? A graduate of West Point and Vietnam veteran, he served for 23 years in the military before becoming a professor at Boston University. His new book, Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country, asks whether our reliance on a professional military rather than a citizen's army has lured us into a morass of endless war - a trap that threatens not only our global reputation but democracy itself.
    Among its deadly side effects, the war in Syria has created a refugee crisis beyond that country's borders - a "disgraceful humanitarian calamity" and "the great tragedy of this century," according to the UN. Deborah Amos is a veteran National Public Radio Middle East correspondent. She wrote about the exiled and dispossessed of the region in her book Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East and has been in the refugee camps and on the Syrian front lines. Amos joins Donahue for a discussion of the human toll of the Syrian fighting, and the potential impact of millions of displaced people on the region.
    As members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee reached an agreement late Tuesday on wording of a new resolution authorizing US military force against the Syrian government, events will likely change quickly. What won't have changed is the need for a full discussion of our motives and American foreign policy, not just when it comes to Syria but in the entire Middle East.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5310H] The debate over US intervention in Syria played out in Washington and on the global stage this week. There were hearings on Capitol Hill and President Obama presented his arguments for military involvement during an overseas news conference ahead of the G-20 meetings in Russia. President Obama insists that the credibility of the US, Congress and the international community is on the line over any response to Syria's alleged use of chemical weapons. During congressional hearings Secretary of State John Kerry reiterated that the US has evidence that the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has used chemical weapons including sarin nerve gas against civilians, most recently on August 21. House Speaker John Boehner and Arizona Senator John McCain are among the Republicans supporting President Obama's plan, but the Obama administration is also facing bipartisan push back against US involvement in Syria's civil war as lawmakers cite home-district opposition to any military action. Gwen Ifill examines the high-stakes risks and consequences of a U.S. led attack on Syria with: David Sanger of The New York Times, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Susan Davis of USA Today, and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3137] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#108H] * Al Hunt, David Ignatius, Jackie Calmes and Mark Halperin discuss Syria * Hari Sreenivasan, anchor of PBS's new Weekend NewsHour * Filmmaker Shane Salerno on J.D. Salinger * An appreciation of journalist David Frost who died earlier this week * and we look inside Donald Judd's home & studio duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2521H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#126] Follow The Leader A political coming-of-age documentary about three boys who want to be President. Over three life-changing years, each rethinks his beliefs and discovers who he truly wants to be as an adult. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#117H] Perilous Diesel/ The Reverse Evolution Machine Learn more about California's new efforts to reduce pollution from diesel soot from aging ships, trucks and buses, a health threat whose most serious impacts are on low-income areas. And find out how scientists are flipping evolution on its head by studying the DNA of living animals to discover more about the earliest mammals. Plus, San Francisco maps its urban forest online. duration 26:30   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1701] GUANTANAMO ETHICS - In the wake of the September 11th attacks, the US established a detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to imprison and interrogate those captured in the new war against terror. Today, citing concerns about torture and human rights abuses, a growing movement is urging that Gitmo be shut down. Kim Lawton looks at the complex ethical and moral questions surrounding Guantanamo, including whether hunger-striking detainees should be force fed.
    BUDDHIST UNIVERSITY - Buddhism was born in India some 2500 years ago and has spread elsewhere in Asia but only a tiny fraction of India's population is Buddhist. For decades, in a revival effort, the Indian government has encouraged pilgrims to come to one of India's holiest locations, the ancient city of Bodh Gaya and, as Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, there is now an effort to revive the ancient Buddhist university that once flourished there.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1011] Great Investors: Robert Kessler WT explores the case for bonds. "Great Investor" Robert Kessler explains why moving out of bonds could be a big investment mistake. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#301H] Join financial advisor Ric Edelman as he answers a vital viewer question: "How do I beat inflation?" Also Ric talks with astronaut Dan Barry about ways investors can profit on the final frontier, and Jean Edelman explains how a little humor can go a long way. All that and much more on this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2521H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3137] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5310H] The debate over US intervention in Syria played out in Washington and on the global stage this week. There were hearings on Capitol Hill and President Obama presented his arguments for military involvement during an overseas news conference ahead of the G-20 meetings in Russia. President Obama insists that the credibility of the US, Congress and the international community is on the line over any response to Syria's alleged use of chemical weapons. During congressional hearings Secretary of State John Kerry reiterated that the US has evidence that the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has used chemical weapons including sarin nerve gas against civilians, most recently on August 21. House Speaker John Boehner and Arizona Senator John McCain are among the Republicans supporting President Obama's plan, but the Obama administration is also facing bipartisan push back against US involvement in Syria's civil war as lawmakers cite home-district opposition to any military action. Gwen Ifill examines the high-stakes risks and consequences of a U.S. led attack on Syria with: David Sanger of The New York Times, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Susan Davis of USA Today, and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2442H] September 6, 2013 Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    UC LEADERSHIP TRANSITION - As Mark Yudof bids farewell as president of the University of California, we look at his legacy and challenges faced by the public university system moving forward. His 5 year tenure oversaw a near doubling of tuition and student protests, but he is credited with expanding financial aid programs and reforming the system's pension plan.
    AMERICA'S CUP MAKES WAVES - The America's Cup finals begin on Saturday, pitting Larry Ellison's Oracle Team USA against Emirates Team New Zealand in a best-of-17 series that could last two weeks. Meanwhile, illegal weights on a Team USA catamaran have resulted in what are being described as the harshest penalties in the history of the sailing competition. The team was docked two points and fined $ 250,000 and a jury banned three team members from further participation in this year's races.
    NEW IPHONE - Expectations are mounting for Apple to introduce new iPhone models on September 10. Updates to the current iPhone 5, new color choices, and the availability of a lower-priced model are rumored to be announced next Tuesday. Apple's event comes amid speculation about the company's strategy for pursuing a greater market share overseas, particularly in China.
    Guests: Ana Tintocalis, KQED News; Julian Guthrie, San Francisco Chronicle; and Kara Swisher, All Things Digital
    BURNING MAN BEYOND THE PLAYA - Every year for one week, bold, super-sized works of art spring to life in a harsh desert playa in Nevada. Burning Man, with hundreds of original works and more than 60, 000 attendees, has become North America's largest outdoor art festival. Host Thuy Vu meets the Flaming Lotus Girls, a female-driven team of Bay Area artists who are pushing themselves to the limit to create an enormous metal tree stump with fire-breathing fungi. Vu also examines how the Burning Man art scene has blossomed beyond the desert, with iconic sculptures transplanted to urban settings and even major civic installations like The Bay Lights.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#235H] What Are We Doing In Syria? With the probability of American intervention, Syria is everywhere in the news. This week Phil Donahue, filling in for Bill Moyers, speaks with NPR Middle East correspondent Deborah Amos and historian and Vietnam veteran Andrew Bacevich about the possible repercussions of our actions in the Middle East.
    As he has so often in recent years, historian and analyst Andrew Bacevich is asking the important questions about America's role in the world and specifically why we should go into Syria. Is a military response justified and if we take action, where does it stop? A graduate of West Point and Vietnam veteran, he served for 23 years in the military before becoming a professor at Boston University. His new book, Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country, asks whether our reliance on a professional military rather than a citizen's army has lured us into a morass of endless war - a trap that threatens not only our global reputation but democracy itself.
    Among its deadly side effects, the war in Syria has created a refugee crisis beyond that country's borders - a "disgraceful humanitarian calamity" and "the great tragedy of this century," according to the UN. Deborah Amos is a veteran National Public Radio Middle East correspondent. She wrote about the exiled and dispossessed of the region in her book Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East and has been in the refugee camps and on the Syrian front lines. Amos joins Donahue for a discussion of the human toll of the Syrian fighting, and the potential impact of millions of displaced people on the region.
    As members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee reached an agreement late Tuesday on wording of a new resolution authorizing US military force against the Syrian government, events will likely change quickly. What won't have changed is the need for a full discussion of our motives and American foreign policy, not just when it comes to Syria but in the entire Middle East.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2521H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3137] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2226H] Madam President * Young People will buy Obamacare exchanges * Interracial couples more likely to live together than get married * Madam President interview with Stephanie Schriock, President of Emily's List.
    Panelists: Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-DC; Megan Beyer, Center for Gender Equality; Francesca Chambers, Red Alert Editor; Heritage Foundations' Genevieve Wood.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#211] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#117H] Perilous Diesel/ The Reverse Evolution Machine Learn more about California's new efforts to reduce pollution from diesel soot from aging ships, trucks and buses, a health threat whose most serious impacts are on low-income areas. And find out how scientists are flipping evolution on its head by studying the DNA of living animals to discover more about the earliest mammals. Plus, San Francisco maps its urban forest online. duration 26:30   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#108H] * Al Hunt, David Ignatius, Jackie Calmes and Mark Halperin discuss Syria * Hari Sreenivasan, anchor of PBS's new Weekend NewsHour * Filmmaker Shane Salerno on J.D. Salinger * An appreciation of journalist David Frost who died earlier this week * and we look inside Donald Judd's home & studio duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2442H] September 6, 2013 Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    UC LEADERSHIP TRANSITION - As Mark Yudof bids farewell as president of the University of California, we look at his legacy and challenges faced by the public university system moving forward. His 5 year tenure oversaw a near doubling of tuition and student protests, but he is credited with expanding financial aid programs and reforming the system's pension plan.
    AMERICA'S CUP MAKES WAVES - The America's Cup finals begin on Saturday, pitting Larry Ellison's Oracle Team USA against Emirates Team New Zealand in a best-of-17 series that could last two weeks. Meanwhile, illegal weights on a Team USA catamaran have resulted in what are being described as the harshest penalties in the history of the sailing competition. The team was docked two points and fined $ 250,000 and a jury banned three team members from further participation in this year's races.
    NEW IPHONE - Expectations are mounting for Apple to introduce new iPhone models on September 10. Updates to the current iPhone 5, new color choices, and the availability of a lower-priced model are rumored to be announced next Tuesday. Apple's event comes amid speculation about the company's strategy for pursuing a greater market share overseas, particularly in China.
    Guests: Ana Tintocalis, KQED News; Julian Guthrie, San Francisco Chronicle; and Kara Swisher, All Things Digital
    BURNING MAN BEYOND THE PLAYA - Every year for one week, bold, super-sized works of art spring to life in a harsh desert playa in Nevada. Burning Man, with hundreds of original works and more than 60, 000 attendees, has become North America's largest outdoor art festival. Host Thuy Vu meets the Flaming Lotus Girls, a female-driven team of Bay Area artists who are pushing themselves to the limit to create an enormous metal tree stump with fire-breathing fungi. Vu also examines how the Burning Man art scene has blossomed beyond the desert, with iconic sculptures transplanted to urban settings and even major civic installations like The Bay Lights.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3137] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5310H] The debate over US intervention in Syria played out in Washington and on the global stage this week. There were hearings on Capitol Hill and President Obama presented his arguments for military involvement during an overseas news conference ahead of the G-20 meetings in Russia. President Obama insists that the credibility of the US, Congress and the international community is on the line over any response to Syria's alleged use of chemical weapons. During congressional hearings Secretary of State John Kerry reiterated that the US has evidence that the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has used chemical weapons including sarin nerve gas against civilians, most recently on August 21. House Speaker John Boehner and Arizona Senator John McCain are among the Republicans supporting President Obama's plan, but the Obama administration is also facing bipartisan push back against US involvement in Syria's civil war as lawmakers cite home-district opposition to any military action. Gwen Ifill examines the high-stakes risks and consequences of a U.S. led attack on Syria with: David Sanger of The New York Times, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Susan Davis of USA Today, and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#235H] What Are We Doing In Syria? With the probability of American intervention, Syria is everywhere in the news. This week Phil Donahue, filling in for Bill Moyers, speaks with NPR Middle East correspondent Deborah Amos and historian and Vietnam veteran Andrew Bacevich about the possible repercussions of our actions in the Middle East.
    As he has so often in recent years, historian and analyst Andrew Bacevich is asking the important questions about America's role in the world and specifically why we should go into Syria. Is a military response justified and if we take action, where does it stop? A graduate of West Point and Vietnam veteran, he served for 23 years in the military before becoming a professor at Boston University. His new book, Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country, asks whether our reliance on a professional military rather than a citizen's army has lured us into a morass of endless war - a trap that threatens not only our global reputation but democracy itself.
    Among its deadly side effects, the war in Syria has created a refugee crisis beyond that country's borders - a "disgraceful humanitarian calamity" and "the great tragedy of this century," according to the UN. Deborah Amos is a veteran National Public Radio Middle East correspondent. She wrote about the exiled and dispossessed of the region in her book Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East and has been in the refugee camps and on the Syrian front lines. Amos joins Donahue for a discussion of the human toll of the Syrian fighting, and the potential impact of millions of displaced people on the region.
    As members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee reached an agreement late Tuesday on wording of a new resolution authorizing US military force against the Syrian government, events will likely change quickly. What won't have changed is the need for a full discussion of our motives and American foreign policy, not just when it comes to Syria but in the entire Middle East.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#102H] Included: Jeffrey Brown profiles celebrated composer and songwriter Stephen Sondheim and the New Hampshire arts institute that has nurtured the talents of several generations of creative minds. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2442H] September 6, 2013 Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    UC LEADERSHIP TRANSITION - As Mark Yudof bids farewell as president of the University of California, we look at his legacy and challenges faced by the public university system moving forward. His 5 year tenure oversaw a near doubling of tuition and student protests, but he is credited with expanding financial aid programs and reforming the system's pension plan.
    AMERICA'S CUP MAKES WAVES - The America's Cup finals begin on Saturday, pitting Larry Ellison's Oracle Team USA against Emirates Team New Zealand in a best-of-17 series that could last two weeks. Meanwhile, illegal weights on a Team USA catamaran have resulted in what are being described as the harshest penalties in the history of the sailing competition. The team was docked two points and fined $ 250,000 and a jury banned three team members from further participation in this year's races.
    NEW IPHONE - Expectations are mounting for Apple to introduce new iPhone models on September 10. Updates to the current iPhone 5, new color choices, and the availability of a lower-priced model are rumored to be announced next Tuesday. Apple's event comes amid speculation about the company's strategy for pursuing a greater market share overseas, particularly in China.
    Guests: Ana Tintocalis, KQED News; Julian Guthrie, San Francisco Chronicle; and Kara Swisher, All Things Digital
    BURNING MAN BEYOND THE PLAYA - Every year for one week, bold, super-sized works of art spring to life in a harsh desert playa in Nevada. Burning Man, with hundreds of original works and more than 60, 000 attendees, has become North America's largest outdoor art festival. Host Thuy Vu meets the Flaming Lotus Girls, a female-driven team of Bay Area artists who are pushing themselves to the limit to create an enormous metal tree stump with fire-breathing fungi. Vu also examines how the Burning Man art scene has blossomed beyond the desert, with iconic sculptures transplanted to urban settings and even major civic installations like The Bay Lights.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#211H] Anthropology of Innovation Technological innovation depends on individuals who can "silo bust" - the term used to describe jumping across boundaries and categories. The Financial Times Editor Gillian Tett leads a distinguished panel in a discussion about the creation of silos within organizations and why a person's ability to "silo bust" may hold the key to innovation. duration 53:13   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#235H] What Are We Doing In Syria? With the probability of American intervention, Syria is everywhere in the news. This week Phil Donahue, filling in for Bill Moyers, speaks with NPR Middle East correspondent Deborah Amos and historian and Vietnam veteran Andrew Bacevich about the possible repercussions of our actions in the Middle East.
    As he has so often in recent years, historian and analyst Andrew Bacevich is asking the important questions about America's role in the world and specifically why we should go into Syria. Is a military response justified and if we take action, where does it stop? A graduate of West Point and Vietnam veteran, he served for 23 years in the military before becoming a professor at Boston University. His new book, Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country, asks whether our reliance on a professional military rather than a citizen's army has lured us into a morass of endless war - a trap that threatens not only our global reputation but democracy itself.
    Among its deadly side effects, the war in Syria has created a refugee crisis beyond that country's borders - a "disgraceful humanitarian calamity" and "the great tragedy of this century," according to the UN. Deborah Amos is a veteran National Public Radio Middle East correspondent. She wrote about the exiled and dispossessed of the region in her book Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East and has been in the refugee camps and on the Syrian front lines. Amos joins Donahue for a discussion of the human toll of the Syrian fighting, and the potential impact of millions of displaced people on the region.
    As members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee reached an agreement late Tuesday on wording of a new resolution authorizing US military force against the Syrian government, events will likely change quickly. What won't have changed is the need for a full discussion of our motives and American foreign policy, not just when it comes to Syria but in the entire Middle East.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    The March This documentary examines the 1963 March on Washington, its history and how it nearly did not take place. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Intelligence Squared [#107H] Is The Fda Too Cautious? The Food and Drug Administration, the oldest comprehensive consumer protection agency in the U.S. federal government, is charged with protecting the public health. Under this mandate, it regulates drugs and medical devices for their safety and effectiveness. But is it a failing mandate? It's long been argued that the FDA's long and costly approval processes stifle innovation and keep life-changing treatments from the market. But the question remains: when it comes to public health, is it ever okay to sacrifice safety for speed? duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#615] The List An American aid worker fights to save the lives of Iraqis who helped the U.S. reconstruction effort. After leading reconstruction teams in Iraq for two years, 26-year-old Kirk Johnson returns home to discover that many of his former Iraqi colleagues are being killed, kidnapped, or forced into exile by radical militias. Frustrated by a stagnating government bureaucracy that has failed to protect these people, he begins compiling a list of Iraqi allies and helps them find refuge and a new life in America. The List traces the evolution of Kirk's campaign from a one-man crusade into a nationwide grassroots movement. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#320] Maquilapolis Women workers in Tijuana's assembly factories tell their stories as they work to carve out lives of agency in a new and complicated century, revealing the transformation of a city and its people by globalization. duration 54:21   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Sunday, September 8, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too