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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, August 31, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 31, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10745H] Syria * Shields and Brooks * Trees * March on Washington * Seamus Heaney duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32193Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - the US makes its case for a strike on Syria. What does it mean for the markets? And find out why next week will be a crucial one for the Federal Reserve. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2979] Tavis talks with award-winning educator Rafe Esquith. An innovative, award-winning classroom teacher, Esquith gives the backstory to his book of no-nonsense advice, Real Talk for Real Teachers. Tavis also chats with contemporary jazz and pop trumpeter and composer Chris Botti. The accomplished musician talks about winning a Grammy this year for his CD, "Impressions," and his versatility in both jazz and pop. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#903] Mumbai Massacre On November 26, 2008, what began as a typical day in a buzzing cosmopolitan city devolved into a nightmare of explosions, gunfire and death when terrorists attacked. The world watched in horror as the escalating violence was broadcast live across the globe. But within the walls of the besieged hotels, a social networking revolution was taking place. Even as the terrorists watched CNN to find out where their victims were hiding, the prisoners were texting with terrorism experts, passing information to specially set up user-groups, and even searching the web for plans of the buildings to coordinate their escapes. Told completely from the victims' perspective using their own words, voicemails, texts, and user-group postings, this episode places viewers inside the deadly cat and mouse game as it played out. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1652] SISTER JOAN CHITTISTER - Sister Joan Chittister, author of more than 40 books on the spiritual life that have sold more than a million copies, has been a member of Mount St. Benedict Monastery in Erie, Pa. , for the past 61 years. Judy Valente profiles and interviews the controversial nun who has long advocated and worked for a wide variety of social causes many of which have rankled the Catholic church hierarchy.
    JAINS - Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Delhi, India on Jainism, a belief system sometimes confused with Hinduism, which dates back to at least the sixth century BC. Though there are now only about 5 million Jains among India's population of 1.2 billion, Jainism's imprint on India's history, including its independence movement, is large. The most devout Jains revere all forms of life, advocate celibacy and renounce all material possessions, including clothing.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1010] Great Investors: John Bogle WT features an interview with one of the investment greats! John C. Bogle, Vanguard founder, index fund creator and tireless advocate for the little guy, discusses how investors can succeed despite Wall Street's problems. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2225H] * Women over 50 unable to find work * the lack of women in Obama's Cabinet * Behind the Headlines: The Family Medical Leave Act: 20 years later.
    Panelists: Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily; Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa, The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Progressive Magazine's Ruth Conniff.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#208] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Building The Dream Building the Dream recounts the journey of an idea for a national monument honoring Martin Luther King Jr. - from a group of friends talking around a kitchen table to the creation of this permanent symbol - to ensure King's Dream will remain alive for future generations. duration 53:34   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    The March This documentary examines the 1963 March on Washington, its history and how it nearly did not take place. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#234H] John Lewis Marches On On an encore rebroadcast of Moyers & Company (check local listings), Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington, which they both attended 50 years ago. Moyers and Lewis share their experiences and revelations from the 60's civil rights era. Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attracted a curious crowd of children and adults, and conducted a spontaneous lesson in civil rights history: http: //billmoyers.com/segment/john-lewis-steps-back-into-history/ Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers ? who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time ? also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans ? championed at the March on Washington ? continues to be thwarted. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#210] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2520H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5309H] * President Barack Obama made the case for US military strike against Syria on Wednesday during an interview with Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff. The president talked about the need for intervention in Syria's civil war on the basis of US national security interests as well as humanitarian concerns.
    The Obama administration is scheduled to brief members of Congress and present intelligence including satellite images and intercepted telephone calls linking Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime to last week's deadly chemical attacks that are estimated to have killed up to 1300 people. Syria denies using chemical weapons, and blames rebel forces. According to United Nations estimates, more than 100,000 people have died and more than one million others have been displaced since the conflict began in March of 2011.
    As the Obama administration moves closer to possible military action, House Speaker John Boehner is demanding President Obama make the case to the American people before using force. And a recent poll shows most Americans are opposed to any US intervention even if chemical weapons have been used in Syria. Are there other options for the US and international community and what risks are involved? We will get analysis on the situation in Syria from:
    Peter Baker of The New York Times; < br />Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News;
    John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times;
    and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post.
    * This week America marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington that was a catalyst for civil rights reform. One of its other goals was to be a call for economic and political equality in America. 50 years later what progress has been made and what struggles remain? We'll take a closer look.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17242Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2225H] * Women over 50 unable to find work * the lack of women in Obama's Cabinet * Behind the Headlines: The Family Medical Leave Act: 20 years later.
    Panelists: Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily; Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa, The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Progressive Magazine's Ruth Conniff.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3136] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#107H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#234H] John Lewis Marches On On an encore rebroadcast of Moyers & Company (check local listings), Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington, which they both attended 50 years ago. Moyers and Lewis share their experiences and revelations from the 60's civil rights era. Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attracted a curious crowd of children and adults, and conducted a spontaneous lesson in civil rights history: http: //billmoyers.com/segment/john-lewis-steps-back-into-history/ Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers ? who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time ? also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans ? championed at the March on Washington ? continues to be thwarted. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Natural Heroes [#513] It's Not Just Empty Space with David Suzuki Earth + Air + Fire + Water = Life. In a time when people are thirsty for honesty, inspiration, meaning and global change, renowned scientist and visionary Dr. David Suzuki delivers the most important message of his career: what it means to be fully human in our interconnected universe. The film's stunning motion graphics weave a tapestry that transforms Dr. Suzuki's wisdom into a complete sensory experience, literally creating new worlds and new ways of seeing. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#236] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    POV [#2607H] The Law In These Parts Israeli filmmaker Ra'anan Alexandrowicz examines the system of military administration used by Israel since the Six Day War of 1967 -- featuring the system's leading creators. In a series of thoughtful and candid interviews, Israeli judges, prosecutors and legal advisers who helped devise the occupation's legal framework paint a complex picture of the Middle East conflict and the balance among political interests, security and human rights that has come with it. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 3:30 pm
    POV [#2608H] 5 Broken Cameras This film is a deeply personal first-hand account of life and nonviolent resistance in Bil'in, a West Bank village where Israel is building a security fence. Palestinian Emad Burnat, who bought his first camera in 2005 to record the birth of his youngest son, shot the film and Israeli filmmaker Guy Davidi co-directed. The filmmakers follow one family's evolution over five years, witnessing a child's growth from a newborn baby into a young boy who observes the world unfolding around him. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TV14-V
  • 5:00 pm
    The March This documentary examines the 1963 March on Washington, its history and how it nearly did not take place. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3136] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5309H] * President Barack Obama made the case for US military strike against Syria on Wednesday during an interview with Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff. The president talked about the need for intervention in Syria's civil war on the basis of US national security interests as well as humanitarian concerns.
    The Obama administration is scheduled to brief members of Congress and present intelligence including satellite images and intercepted telephone calls linking Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime to last week's deadly chemical attacks that are estimated to have killed up to 1300 people. Syria denies using chemical weapons, and blames rebel forces. According to United Nations estimates, more than 100,000 people have died and more than one million others have been displaced since the conflict began in March of 2011.
    As the Obama administration moves closer to possible military action, House Speaker John Boehner is demanding President Obama make the case to the American people before using force. And a recent poll shows most Americans are opposed to any US intervention even if chemical weapons have been used in Syria. Are there other options for the US and international community and what risks are involved? We will get analysis on the situation in Syria from:
    Peter Baker of The New York Times; < br />Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News;
    John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times;
    and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post.
    * This week America marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington that was a catalyst for civil rights reform. One of its other goals was to be a call for economic and political equality in America. 50 years later what progress has been made and what struggles remain? We'll take a closer look.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:30 pm
    Natural Heroes [#513] It's Not Just Empty Space with David Suzuki Earth + Air + Fire + Water = Life. In a time when people are thirsty for honesty, inspiration, meaning and global change, renowned scientist and visionary Dr. David Suzuki delivers the most important message of his career: what it means to be fully human in our interconnected universe. The film's stunning motion graphics weave a tapestry that transforms Dr. Suzuki's wisdom into a complete sensory experience, literally creating new worlds and new ways of seeing. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1203] Around The World - Panamericana: Incas & Inquisitions Brianna Barnes journeys to Peru, home of the legendary Incas, where she begins her trek in Cajamarca, where thousands of Incan soldiers were slaughtered by Pizarro's conquistadors. After visiting one of the world's largest gold mines, Brianna makes her way to Lima, the "City of Kings," once home to the Spanish Inquisition in South America. In Cusco, she learns about the golden Inca Empire before ending her journey on the volcano El Misti, where incredibly well-preserved ice mummies tell the story of the country's illustrious past. duration 56:07   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2913H] Cracking The Koala Code By following individual koalas from a small social group on an Australian island, we will reveal just how a koala manages to survive and thrive on a diet poisonous to almost all other herbivorous mammals. From the miracle of marsupial birth, to tender moments of discovery between mother and newborn joey, encounters with threatening forest creatures, battles between rival males and the complex chorus of bellows and grunts that have become so important to science - we will join leading scientists as they unravel just what a forest needs to support a healthy population of koalas by listening to these marsupials themselves and cracking the koala code. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3804H] Making Stuff Cleaner Most modern materials are dangerous to the environment, but what about cleaning up our world? Batteries grown from viruses, tires made from orange peel oil, plastics made of sugar, and solar cells that cook up hydrogen-these are just a few glimpses of a new generation of clean materials that could power devices of the future. In Making Stuff Cleaner, David Pogue explores the rapidly developing science and business of clean energy and examines alternative ways to generate it, store it, and distribute it. Is hydrogen the way to go? One scientist is even using America's abundance of chicken feathers to create a cheap way to make hydrogen cars safer. What about lithium batteries? Does this solve an energy problem or create a new dependency - in this case, on South America for a different kind of limited resource than oil? Can scientists instead develop a process in which batteries run on molten salts found in cheap abundance in the US or on genetically engineered viruses? Pogue investigates the latest developments in biobased fuels and in harnessing solar energy for our cars, homes, and industry in a fascinating hour full of the "stuff" of a sustainable future. duration 56:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Nova [#3805H] Making Stuff Smarter What can nature teach us about building smarter materials? Can we create materials that sense and respond? "When describing 'smart materials,' one analogy scientists give is the evolution from the first Terminator robot, a machine made of metal and circuitry, to the shape-shifting 'liquid guy' in Terminator 2," said Making Stuff producer Chris Schmidt. Smarter looks into the growing number of materials that almost seem alive - able to react, change and even learn. An Army tanker truck that heals its own bullet wounds. An airplane wing that changes shape as it flies. For inspirations and ideas, scientists are turning to nature and biology and producing some innovative new developments in materials science. Knowledge and inspiration drawn from nature are showing scientists new ways to give our materials amazing new abilities. By understanding how geckos climb even smooth walls, scientists have created a gecko adhesive that let's robots do the same. Studying the properties of skin has led to the development of self-healing protective foam. And Pogue literally goes swimming with sharks to understand a different kind of skin that is intriguing scientists. Scientists are modeling a material after sharkskin to develop an antibacterial film that, when sprayed in hospitals, could eliminate MRSA and other anti-biotic resistant bacteria. Pogue concludes "Smarter" with a visit to a scientist who has created a material that may make Harry potter's invisibility cloak a reality! duration 56:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#122] Flying: Confessions of a Free Woman| Part 2 In this two part documentary, master storyteller Jennifer Fox lays bare her own turbulent life to penetrate what it means to be a free woman today. As her drama of work and relationships unfolds over four years, our protagonist travels to over seventeen countries to understand how diverse women define their lives when there is no map. Employing an ingenious new camera technique, called "passing the camera", Fox creates a documentary language that mirrors the special way women communicate. Over intimate conversations around kitchen tables from South Africa to Russia, India and Pakistan, she initiates a groundbreaking dialogue among women, illuminating universal concerns across race, class and nationality. duration 2:23:31   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, August 31, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Comcast 191 & 621
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