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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Friday, August 30, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, August 30, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10744H] Syria * Economy * Football * Principals * March on Washington duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32192Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the economy grew faster than originally thought in the second quarter. What it means for the markets, the Federal Reserve and your money. And, with tuition costs rising, students are looking for alternative ways of paying for college. In part two of NBR's series, we look at students turning to crowdsourcing as a way to pay. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2978] 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington, part 3 of 3 Tavis talks MLK - the man and his legacy - with Dr. Clayborne Carson, director of Stanford University's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute. Carson reflects on the 1963 march - his first demonstration - and one of its complex and multifaceted leaders, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tavis also chats with Martin Luther King III and Rev. Bernice King. Two of Dr. King's three surviving children talk about the legacy of their activist father. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Frontline [#3109] Never Forget to Lie In his latest film, Marian Marzynski (Return to Poland, Shtetl) returns to the Warsaw ghetto of his childhood. Marzynski tells the story of how he as a Jewish boy escaped the Holocaust, hiding from the Nazis and surviving the war as an altar boy in a Catholic monastery. In this deeply personal film, he shares the poignant, painful recollections of other child survivors, many of whom are visiting scenes of their childhood for the last time. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4110] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2979] Tavis talks with award-winning educator Rafe Esquith. An innovative, award-winning classroom teacher, Esquith gives the backstory to his book of no-nonsense advice, Real Talk for Real Teachers. Tavis also chats with contemporary jazz and pop trumpeter and composer Chris Botti. The accomplished musician talks about winning a Grammy this year for his CD, "Impressions," and his versatility in both jazz and pop. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Well Read [#105] Mark Bowden, "The Finish: The Killing of Osama Bin Laden" Bowden traces the United States' war on terror from 9/11 to the Navy Seals' daring elimination of Al Qaeda mastermind Osama Bin Laden. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Closer to Truth [#1205] How Does Personal Identity Persist Through Time? Is the self an illusion? Decades roll by; every molecule of my body changes many times over. Yet I sense myself the same. Not just continuity, but unity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Nova [#3804H] Making Stuff Cleaner Most modern materials are dangerous to the environment, but what about cleaning up our world? Batteries grown from viruses, tires made from orange peel oil, plastics made of sugar, and solar cells that cook up hydrogen-these are just a few glimpses of a new generation of clean materials that could power devices of the future. In Making Stuff Cleaner, David Pogue explores the rapidly developing science and business of clean energy and examines alternative ways to generate it, store it, and distribute it. Is hydrogen the way to go? One scientist is even using America's abundance of chicken feathers to create a cheap way to make hydrogen cars safer. What about lithium batteries? Does this solve an energy problem or create a new dependency - in this case, on South America for a different kind of limited resource than oil? Can scientists instead develop a process in which batteries run on molten salts found in cheap abundance in the US or on genetically engineered viruses? Pogue investigates the latest developments in biobased fuels and in harnessing solar energy for our cars, homes, and industry in a fascinating hour full of the "stuff" of a sustainable future. duration 56:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Nova [#3805H] Making Stuff Smarter What can nature teach us about building smarter materials? Can we create materials that sense and respond? "When describing 'smart materials,' one analogy scientists give is the evolution from the first Terminator robot, a machine made of metal and circuitry, to the shape-shifting 'liquid guy' in Terminator 2," said Making Stuff producer Chris Schmidt. Smarter looks into the growing number of materials that almost seem alive - able to react, change and even learn. An Army tanker truck that heals its own bullet wounds. An airplane wing that changes shape as it flies. For inspirations and ideas, scientists are turning to nature and biology and producing some innovative new developments in materials science. Knowledge and inspiration drawn from nature are showing scientists new ways to give our materials amazing new abilities. By understanding how geckos climb even smooth walls, scientists have created a gecko adhesive that let's robots do the same. Studying the properties of skin has led to the development of self-healing protective foam. And Pogue literally goes swimming with sharks to understand a different kind of skin that is intriguing scientists. Scientists are modeling a material after sharkskin to develop an antibacterial film that, when sprayed in hospitals, could eliminate MRSA and other anti-biotic resistant bacteria. Pogue concludes "Smarter" with a visit to a scientist who has created a material that may make Harry potter's invisibility cloak a reality! duration 56:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#903] Mumbai Massacre On November 26, 2008, what began as a typical day in a buzzing cosmopolitan city devolved into a nightmare of explosions, gunfire and death when terrorists attacked. The world watched in horror as the escalating violence was broadcast live across the globe. But within the walls of the besieged hotels, a social networking revolution was taking place. Even as the terrorists watched CNN to find out where their victims were hiding, the prisoners were texting with terrorism experts, passing information to specially set up user-groups, and even searching the web for plans of the buildings to coordinate their escapes. Told completely from the victims' perspective using their own words, voicemails, texts, and user-group postings, this episode places viewers inside the deadly cat and mouse game as it played out. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Frontline [#3109] Never Forget to Lie In his latest film, Marian Marzynski (Return to Poland, Shtetl) returns to the Warsaw ghetto of his childhood. Marzynski tells the story of how he as a Jewish boy escaped the Holocaust, hiding from the Nazis and surviving the war as an altar boy in a Catholic monastery. In this deeply personal film, he shares the poignant, painful recollections of other child survivors, many of whom are visiting scenes of their childhood for the last time. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2979] Tavis talks with award-winning educator Rafe Esquith. An innovative, award-winning classroom teacher, Esquith gives the backstory to his book of no-nonsense advice, Real Talk for Real Teachers. Tavis also chats with contemporary jazz and pop trumpeter and composer Chris Botti. The accomplished musician talks about winning a Grammy this year for his CD, "Impressions," and his versatility in both jazz and pop. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2978] 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington, part 3 of 3 Tavis talks MLK - the man and his legacy - with Dr. Clayborne Carson, director of Stanford University's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute. Carson reflects on the 1963 march - his first demonstration - and one of its complex and multifaceted leaders, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tavis also chats with Martin Luther King III and Rev. Bernice King. Two of Dr. King's three surviving children talk about the legacy of their activist father. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Well Read [#105] Mark Bowden, "The Finish: The Killing of Osama Bin Laden" Bowden traces the United States' war on terror from 9/11 to the Navy Seals' daring elimination of Al Qaeda mastermind Osama Bin Laden. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Closer to Truth [#1205] How Does Personal Identity Persist Through Time? Is the self an illusion? Decades roll by; every molecule of my body changes many times over. Yet I sense myself the same. Not just continuity, but unity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Nova [#3804H] Making Stuff Cleaner Most modern materials are dangerous to the environment, but what about cleaning up our world? Batteries grown from viruses, tires made from orange peel oil, plastics made of sugar, and solar cells that cook up hydrogen-these are just a few glimpses of a new generation of clean materials that could power devices of the future. In Making Stuff Cleaner, David Pogue explores the rapidly developing science and business of clean energy and examines alternative ways to generate it, store it, and distribute it. Is hydrogen the way to go? One scientist is even using America's abundance of chicken feathers to create a cheap way to make hydrogen cars safer. What about lithium batteries? Does this solve an energy problem or create a new dependency - in this case, on South America for a different kind of limited resource than oil? Can scientists instead develop a process in which batteries run on molten salts found in cheap abundance in the US or on genetically engineered viruses? Pogue investigates the latest developments in biobased fuels and in harnessing solar energy for our cars, homes, and industry in a fascinating hour full of the "stuff" of a sustainable future. duration 56:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Nova [#3805H] Making Stuff Smarter What can nature teach us about building smarter materials? Can we create materials that sense and respond? "When describing 'smart materials,' one analogy scientists give is the evolution from the first Terminator robot, a machine made of metal and circuitry, to the shape-shifting 'liquid guy' in Terminator 2," said Making Stuff producer Chris Schmidt. Smarter looks into the growing number of materials that almost seem alive - able to react, change and even learn. An Army tanker truck that heals its own bullet wounds. An airplane wing that changes shape as it flies. For inspirations and ideas, scientists are turning to nature and biology and producing some innovative new developments in materials science. Knowledge and inspiration drawn from nature are showing scientists new ways to give our materials amazing new abilities. By understanding how geckos climb even smooth walls, scientists have created a gecko adhesive that let's robots do the same. Studying the properties of skin has led to the development of self-healing protective foam. And Pogue literally goes swimming with sharks to understand a different kind of skin that is intriguing scientists. Scientists are modeling a material after sharkskin to develop an antibacterial film that, when sprayed in hospitals, could eliminate MRSA and other anti-biotic resistant bacteria. Pogue concludes "Smarter" with a visit to a scientist who has created a material that may make Harry potter's invisibility cloak a reality! duration 56:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#903] Mumbai Massacre On November 26, 2008, what began as a typical day in a buzzing cosmopolitan city devolved into a nightmare of explosions, gunfire and death when terrorists attacked. The world watched in horror as the escalating violence was broadcast live across the globe. But within the walls of the besieged hotels, a social networking revolution was taking place. Even as the terrorists watched CNN to find out where their victims were hiding, the prisoners were texting with terrorism experts, passing information to specially set up user-groups, and even searching the web for plans of the buildings to coordinate their escapes. Told completely from the victims' perspective using their own words, voicemails, texts, and user-group postings, this episode places viewers inside the deadly cat and mouse game as it played out. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4110] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9174] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2979] Tavis talks with award-winning educator Rafe Esquith. An innovative, award-winning classroom teacher, Esquith gives the backstory to his book of no-nonsense advice, Real Talk for Real Teachers. Tavis also chats with contemporary jazz and pop trumpeter and composer Chris Botti. The accomplished musician talks about winning a Grammy this year for his CD, "Impressions," and his versatility in both jazz and pop. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32193Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - the US makes its case for a strike on Syria. What does it mean for the markets? And find out why next week will be a crucial one for the Federal Reserve. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10745H] Syria * Shields and Brooks * Trees * March on Washington * Seamus Heaney duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32193Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - the US makes its case for a strike on Syria. What does it mean for the markets? And find out why next week will be a crucial one for the Federal Reserve. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3025] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    BBC Newsnight [#17242Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3415] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10745H] Syria * Shields and Brooks * Trees * March on Washington * Seamus Heaney duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3415] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19180H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3415] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2980] Tavis talks with saxophonist, prolific composer and jazz great Wayne Shorter. The gifted, multiple Grammy winner explains why he's celebrating his milestone birthday with new music. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3415] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#704H] In Fort Collins, Colorado, Calvin, Tina, and Vanessa stop to have a pint with Jennifer Orgolini, Sustainability Director, and Bryan Simpson, Media Relations Director, of New Belgium Brewing Company. The team then proceeds to Kansas City to interview Greg Carroll, CEO of the American Jazz Museum. Across town, they are also able to connect with Michelle Dreher, printmaker, owner, and operator of Two Tone Press. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3415] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10745H] Syria * Shields and Brooks * Trees * March on Washington * Seamus Heaney duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3415] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3025] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10745H] Syria * Shields and Brooks * Trees * March on Washington * Seamus Heaney duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
Friday, August 30, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Comcast 9 and 709
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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

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v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too