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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Sunday, August 18, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, August 18, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#118] Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin During his 60-year career as an activist, organizer and "troublemaker, " Bayard Rustin formulated many of the strategies that propelled the American civil rights movement. His passionate belief in Gandhi' s philosophy of nonviolence drew Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders to him in the 1940's and 50's; his practice of those beliefs drew the attention of the FBI and police. But his open homosexuality forced him to remain in the background, marking him again and again as a "brother outsider." Brother Outsider combines rare archival footage - some of it never before broadcast in the U.S. - with provocative interviews to illuminate the life and work of a forgotten prophet of social change. duration 1:50:44   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#509] Acrobat Fabrice Champion, a renowned trapeze artist, hit another acrobat in mid-air during a show and was paralyzed. Following years of rehabilitation therapy, he returned to the circus as director and teacher. duration 53:00   STEREO
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#232H] How People Power Generates Change With our democracy threatened by plutocrats and the politicians in their pockets more than ever, the antidote to organized money is organized people. It takes time and effort, but across the country, grass roots democracy is growing. Individuals are banding together, organizing toward common goals and demanding change - and often delivering it. On this encore broadcast, Bill sits with three organizers leading the way.
    Marshall Ganz is a social movement legend who dropped out of Harvard to become a volunteer during Mississippi's Freedom Summer of 1964. He then joined forces with Cesar Chavez of the United Farmworkers, protecting workers who picked crops for pennies in California's fields and orchards. Ganz also had a pivotal role organizing students and volunteers for Barack Obama's historic 2008 presidential campaign. Now 70, he's still organizing across the United States and the Middle East, and back at Harvard, teaching students from around the world about what it takes to beat Goliath.
    Later on the broadcast, economic equality advocates Rachel LaForest, executive director of Right to the City, and Madeline Janis, co-founder and national policy director of Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, discuss with Bill how social action can change both policy and lives. Janis led the fight for a living wage in Los Angeles; LaForest fights for fair and affordable housing across the country.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5307H] * Day-long clashes between Egypt's military and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi have left hundreds dead in Cairo. Despite the escalating violence, the Muslim Brotherhood has vowed to continue its protests over the army's overthrow of the democratically-elected Morsi in July. Today President Obama strongly condemned the deadly violence precipitated by the Egyptian military and announced that the US is canceling joint military exercises planned for later this month. But he stopped short of cutting off $1.5 billion in US financial aid to the longtime Mideast ally. Could that be something the White House is considering? Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will report on the Obama Administration's attempt to strike a balance between supporting a democratic transition and ensuring stability in Egypt. < br />* Attorney General Eric Holder is changing the way Federal prosecutors handle drug crimes that come with mandatory, minimum sentences. Holder says it will help alleviate some of the prison overcrowding around the country and divert millions of taxpayer dollars into more effective crime-fighting programs. Pete Williams of NBC News will explain why the new directive has attracted bipartisan support. Plus why a ruling by a federal judge to limit the New York Police Department's "stop and frisk" program is getting pushback from both Mayor Michael Bloomberg and the police union.
    * While headlines continue to be written about the controversy surrounding two proposed movies about Hillary Clinton and speculation about a possible 2016 presidential run, Vice President Joe Biden has been quietly working on his own plan to seek the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination. Jeff Zeleny of ABC News will look at the political ambitions, strengths and weaknesses of these two leading contenders and long-time friends.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3134] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#105H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2518H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#118] Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin During his 60-year career as an activist, organizer and "troublemaker, " Bayard Rustin formulated many of the strategies that propelled the American civil rights movement. His passionate belief in Gandhi' s philosophy of nonviolence drew Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders to him in the 1940's and 50's; his practice of those beliefs drew the attention of the FBI and police. But his open homosexuality forced him to remain in the background, marking him again and again as a "brother outsider." Brother Outsider combines rare archival footage - some of it never before broadcast in the U.S. - with provocative interviews to illuminate the life and work of a forgotten prophet of social change. duration 1:50:44   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1650] BRIDE TRAFFICKING - In India one of the consequences of the widespread introduction of sonograms and the age-old preference for male children has been the frequent aborting of female fetuses. In some regions there are as few as 650 female births for every 1000 males. As Fred de Sam Lazaro reports this has resulted in a growing shortage of women and the trafficking of women to fill the need for Indian brides.
    BUILD-ON MOVEMENT - Bob Faw reports on Build-On, founded by Jim Ziolkowski, a devout Catholic who left a career in corporate finance in 1993 to live what he says is the social justice aspect of his Catholic tradition. Build-On, he claims, breaks the inner-city cycle of poverty, illiteracy and low expectations through service and education and is now in 72 public schools nationwide, enrolling 4000 students and building schools in 6 countries.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1008] Finding Global Value Guests: David Darst, Chief Investment Strategist, Morgan Stanley Wealth Management; Peter Langerman, Chairman, CEO, Franklin Mutual Advisers, LLC; Co-Portfolio Manager, Mutual Global Discovery Fund. This week's WT explores where in the world you can find the highest quality businesses at bargain basement prices. Morgan Stanley's asset allocation star David Darst and Mutual Global Discovery Fund's Peter Langerman pick their favorite investment spots. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#203H] Join Ric Edelman and his staff as they explore the rewards - and the costs - of buying a "supercar" and explain how Roman legions gave us the word "salary". Ric also interviews Don Blandin of the Investor Protection Trust about how to avoid frauds and con artists in the investment world. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2518H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3134] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5307H] * Day-long clashes between Egypt's military and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi have left hundreds dead in Cairo. Despite the escalating violence, the Muslim Brotherhood has vowed to continue its protests over the army's overthrow of the democratically-elected Morsi in July. Today President Obama strongly condemned the deadly violence precipitated by the Egyptian military and announced that the US is canceling joint military exercises planned for later this month. But he stopped short of cutting off $1.5 billion in US financial aid to the longtime Mideast ally. Could that be something the White House is considering? Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will report on the Obama Administration's attempt to strike a balance between supporting a democratic transition and ensuring stability in Egypt. < br />* Attorney General Eric Holder is changing the way Federal prosecutors handle drug crimes that come with mandatory, minimum sentences. Holder says it will help alleviate some of the prison overcrowding around the country and divert millions of taxpayer dollars into more effective crime-fighting programs. Pete Williams of NBC News will explain why the new directive has attracted bipartisan support. Plus why a ruling by a federal judge to limit the New York Police Department's "stop and frisk" program is getting pushback from both Mayor Michael Bloomberg and the police union.
    * While headlines continue to be written about the controversy surrounding two proposed movies about Hillary Clinton and speculation about a possible 2016 presidential run, Vice President Joe Biden has been quietly working on his own plan to seek the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination. Jeff Zeleny of ABC News will look at the political ambitions, strengths and weaknesses of these two leading contenders and long-time friends.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2440H] August 16, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    HILLARY CLINTON'S NEXT MOVE - Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton drew national attention when she delivered her first major domestic policy speech in San Francisco at the American Bar Association's convention on Monday. Clinton's address calling for greater protection of voting rights was widely seen as the kickoff of a 2016 presidential run. < br />FEDERAL SENTENCING REFORM - US Attorney General Eric Holder announced a major shift in federal sentencing policies in a speech in San Francisco. Meanwhile, the state of California makes plans to reduce its prison population by nearly 10,000 even as Gov. Jerry Brown appeals again to the US Supreme Court to intervene. Also in California, a prisoner-led hunger strike protesting conditions in isolation units stretches into its 6th week.
    SHASTA DAM EXPANSION - A controversial $1 billion plan to add as much as 18 feet to the height of Shasta Dam has environmentalists, Native Americans, and agricultural interests at odds. Supporters say it would be a major boost to California's water supply but it would inundate sites sacred to the Winnemem Wintu and require the relocation of roads and property owners near Shasta Lake.
    Guests: Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle; Michael Montgomery, KQED News and Center for Investigative Reporting; Craig Miller, KQED Science Editor.
    TOM STEYER INTERVIEW - KQED's Scott Shafer talks with San Francisco billionaire and green energy advocate Tom Steyer. A former hedge fund manager and founder of Farallon Capital Management, Steyer was the driving force behind last fall's Proposition 39. He's now using his resources to influence the Obama administration's climate change policy and to block the Keystone XL pipeline. A Democrat, Steyer recently supported BART workers at a rally and is considered a potential gubernatorial candidate for California.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#232H] How People Power Generates Change With our democracy threatened by plutocrats and the politicians in their pockets more than ever, the antidote to organized money is organized people. It takes time and effort, but across the country, grass roots democracy is growing. Individuals are banding together, organizing toward common goals and demanding change - and often delivering it. On this encore broadcast, Bill sits with three organizers leading the way.
    Marshall Ganz is a social movement legend who dropped out of Harvard to become a volunteer during Mississippi's Freedom Summer of 1964. He then joined forces with Cesar Chavez of the United Farmworkers, protecting workers who picked crops for pennies in California's fields and orchards. Ganz also had a pivotal role organizing students and volunteers for Barack Obama's historic 2008 presidential campaign. Now 70, he's still organizing across the United States and the Middle East, and back at Harvard, teaching students from around the world about what it takes to beat Goliath.
    Later on the broadcast, economic equality advocates Rachel LaForest, executive director of Right to the City, and Madeline Janis, co-founder and national policy director of Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, discuss with Bill how social action can change both policy and lives. Janis led the fight for a living wage in Los Angeles; LaForest fights for fair and affordable housing across the country.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2518H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3134] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2223H] * High Cost Of Raising Children * Egg Donation For Research: Should Women Get Paid? * Major General Margaret Woodward/Sexual Assault in the Air Force
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Former Judge and Federal Prosecutor Debra Carnahan, FOX News Political Analyst Angela McGlowan
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#208] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:30 pm
    Natural Heroes [#509] Living Lightly A magical glimpse into a world where one 21st century family lives with the land in its seasons. In a corner of New Brunswick, Canada, the craft of scything is practiced as meditation in action. This poetic film is a study in how we might heal our relationship with planet Earth. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#105H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#232H] How People Power Generates Change With our democracy threatened by plutocrats and the politicians in their pockets more than ever, the antidote to organized money is organized people. It takes time and effort, but across the country, grass roots democracy is growing. Individuals are banding together, organizing toward common goals and demanding change - and often delivering it. On this encore broadcast, Bill sits with three organizers leading the way.
    Marshall Ganz is a social movement legend who dropped out of Harvard to become a volunteer during Mississippi's Freedom Summer of 1964. He then joined forces with Cesar Chavez of the United Farmworkers, protecting workers who picked crops for pennies in California's fields and orchards. Ganz also had a pivotal role organizing students and volunteers for Barack Obama's historic 2008 presidential campaign. Now 70, he's still organizing across the United States and the Middle East, and back at Harvard, teaching students from around the world about what it takes to beat Goliath.
    Later on the broadcast, economic equality advocates Rachel LaForest, executive director of Right to the City, and Madeline Janis, co-founder and national policy director of Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, discuss with Bill how social action can change both policy and lives. Janis led the fight for a living wage in Los Angeles; LaForest fights for fair and affordable housing across the country.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5307H] * Day-long clashes between Egypt's military and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi have left hundreds dead in Cairo. Despite the escalating violence, the Muslim Brotherhood has vowed to continue its protests over the army's overthrow of the democratically-elected Morsi in July. Today President Obama strongly condemned the deadly violence precipitated by the Egyptian military and announced that the US is canceling joint military exercises planned for later this month. But he stopped short of cutting off $1.5 billion in US financial aid to the longtime Mideast ally. Could that be something the White House is considering? Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will report on the Obama Administration's attempt to strike a balance between supporting a democratic transition and ensuring stability in Egypt. < br />* Attorney General Eric Holder is changing the way Federal prosecutors handle drug crimes that come with mandatory, minimum sentences. Holder says it will help alleviate some of the prison overcrowding around the country and divert millions of taxpayer dollars into more effective crime-fighting programs. Pete Williams of NBC News will explain why the new directive has attracted bipartisan support. Plus why a ruling by a federal judge to limit the New York Police Department's "stop and frisk" program is getting pushback from both Mayor Michael Bloomberg and the police union.
    * While headlines continue to be written about the controversy surrounding two proposed movies about Hillary Clinton and speculation about a possible 2016 presidential run, Vice President Joe Biden has been quietly working on his own plan to seek the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination. Jeff Zeleny of ABC News will look at the political ambitions, strengths and weaknesses of these two leading contenders and long-time friends.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2518H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3134] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2440H] August 16, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    HILLARY CLINTON'S NEXT MOVE - Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton drew national attention when she delivered her first major domestic policy speech in San Francisco at the American Bar Association's convention on Monday. Clinton's address calling for greater protection of voting rights was widely seen as the kickoff of a 2016 presidential run. < br />FEDERAL SENTENCING REFORM - US Attorney General Eric Holder announced a major shift in federal sentencing policies in a speech in San Francisco. Meanwhile, the state of California makes plans to reduce its prison population by nearly 10,000 even as Gov. Jerry Brown appeals again to the US Supreme Court to intervene. Also in California, a prisoner-led hunger strike protesting conditions in isolation units stretches into its 6th week.
    SHASTA DAM EXPANSION - A controversial $1 billion plan to add as much as 18 feet to the height of Shasta Dam has environmentalists, Native Americans, and agricultural interests at odds. Supporters say it would be a major boost to California's water supply but it would inundate sites sacred to the Winnemem Wintu and require the relocation of roads and property owners near Shasta Lake.
    Guests: Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle; Michael Montgomery, KQED News and Center for Investigative Reporting; Craig Miller, KQED Science Editor.
    TOM STEYER INTERVIEW - KQED's Scott Shafer talks with San Francisco billionaire and green energy advocate Tom Steyer. A former hedge fund manager and founder of Farallon Capital Management, Steyer was the driving force behind last fall's Proposition 39. He's now using his resources to influence the Obama administration's climate change policy and to block the Keystone XL pipeline. A Democrat, Steyer recently supported BART workers at a rally and is considered a potential gubernatorial candidate for California.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Natural Heroes [#509] Living Lightly A magical glimpse into a world where one 21st century family lives with the land in its seasons. In a corner of New Brunswick, Canada, the craft of scything is practiced as meditation in action. This poetic film is a study in how we might heal our relationship with planet Earth. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#209H] Darpa's Dan Kaufman Meet Dan Kaufman, one of the key players in developing information technology for the U.S. military. As the director of the Information Innovation Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, he has overseen numerous research projects that have had lasting impact on United States's military operations. John Markoff of the New York Times moderates. duration 53:14   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#232H] How People Power Generates Change With our democracy threatened by plutocrats and the politicians in their pockets more than ever, the antidote to organized money is organized people. It takes time and effort, but across the country, grass roots democracy is growing. Individuals are banding together, organizing toward common goals and demanding change - and often delivering it. On this encore broadcast, Bill sits with three organizers leading the way.
    Marshall Ganz is a social movement legend who dropped out of Harvard to become a volunteer during Mississippi's Freedom Summer of 1964. He then joined forces with Cesar Chavez of the United Farmworkers, protecting workers who picked crops for pennies in California's fields and orchards. Ganz also had a pivotal role organizing students and volunteers for Barack Obama's historic 2008 presidential campaign. Now 70, he's still organizing across the United States and the Middle East, and back at Harvard, teaching students from around the world about what it takes to beat Goliath.
    Later on the broadcast, economic equality advocates Rachel LaForest, executive director of Right to the City, and Madeline Janis, co-founder and national policy director of Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, discuss with Bill how social action can change both policy and lives. Janis led the fight for a living wage in Los Angeles; LaForest fights for fair and affordable housing across the country.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#121] Flying: Confessions of a Free Woman| Part 1 In this two part documentary, master storyteller Jennifer Fox lays bare her own turbulent life to penetrate what it means to be a free woman today. As her drama of work and relationships unfolds over four years, our protagonist travels to over seventeen countries to understand how diverse women define their lives when there is no map. Employing an ingenious new camera technique, called "passing the camera", Fox creates a documentary language that mirrors the special way women communicate. Over intimate conversations around kitchen tables from South Africa to Russia, India and Pakistan, she initiates a groundbreaking dialogue among women, illuminating universal concerns across race, class and nationality. duration 2:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:30 pm
    Global Voices [#612] Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai tells the story of Kenya's Green Belt Movement and follows Maathai, the movement's founder and the first environmentalist and African woman to win the Nobel Prize. Using archival footage and first-person accounts, the film documents dramatic political confrontations of 1980s and 1990s Kenya and captures Maathai's infectious determination and unwavering courage through in-depth conversations with the film's subjects. duration 55:01   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Hapa: One Step at a Time Race remains a powerful symbol in the US; it still is a shorthand notation for most Americans. This program speaks to how individuals of Asian and Pacific Islander descent are embracing their ethnic experiences as a symbol of change in an ever-evolving multicultural society. It is a thought-provoking exploration of what it means to be a mixed-race American today. The program is a first-person treatment of the struggles people of diverse cultural backgrounds and perspectives face. "Hapa" comes from the Hawaiian phrase hapa haole, which means half white/foreigner. Once considered a derogatory term, Hapa has come to be accepted as a way to describe a person of partial Asian ancestry. By Japanese American Midori Sperandeo, who provides a personal narrative about her evolution from a novice runner into a national class marathoner andshares the parallel path of her personal growth in searching for her racial identity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
Sunday, August 18, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too