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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Sunday, August 11, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, August 11, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#108] My Louisiana Love This film traces a young woman's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to reunite with her Houma Indian family. But soon she sees that her people's traditional way of life is threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil leak are just the latest rounds in this century-old cycle that is forcing Monique's clan to adapt in new ways. Monique must overcome the loss of her house, her father, and her partner, and redefine the meaning of home. duration 1:17:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Out of Order Now more than ever, American citizens are discontented and disillusioned with national politics, with approval ratings for Congress consistently ranking low regardless of the party in power. Senior politicians also note the disappearance of the collegiality they once shared with peers of differing political ideologies. As a result, the ability to discuss issues from varying points of view and negotiate solutions, appears to be fading from the American political process.
    Among many topics, this program addresses the decline in civil discourse and the news media's role in it, partisan gridlock, gerrymandering, vanishing commitment to reasonable compromise, the vilification of moderates and declining civic engagement. It relies on interviews with a broad range of political experts and observers from journalists, academics and political strategists to senior elected officials. They include: journalist Bob Schieffer (CBS News), Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), Sen. Susan Collins (R-MA), Fmr Sen. Evan Bayh (D-IN), Fmr Sen. Alan Simpson (R-WY), Fmr Sen. John Warner (R-VA) .
    duration 27:17   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1002H] Deadliest Battle Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941 was the largest troop offensive in military history. And the Battle of Stalingrad is arguably the deadliest single battle the world has ever seen. The eventual Russian victory has long been lauded as a shining example of Stalin's military genius. He is said to have baited a much more powerful and technologically advanced German army with a carefully executed withdrawal, then caught the Nazis unprepared in a vicious city-block-by-city-block counterattack that decimated the German forces. By the time the battle was over, more than 1 million lives had been lost and the course of the war had been permanently altered. But 70 years after the battle was fought, newly uncovered documents, survivor accounts, and stunning archival footage are revealing a very different picture of a forced retreat, not a tactical one, and of fiercer fighting in the countryside that has previously been suggested. Secrets of the Dead: Deadliest Battle tells the true story of the battle that turned World War II, and established the Soviet Union as a world superpower for the looming Cold War. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#231H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild * Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, Economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    * Also on the broadcast, activist and author Saru Jayaraman marches on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet, and talks about how we can best support their right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's 10 million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, an expose of the restaurant industry.
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5306H] * In a rare diplomatic snub, the White House canceled next month's meeting between President Obama and Russian President Vladimir. The move follows Russia's decision to grant former NSA contractor Edward Snowden asylum. White House spokesperson Jay Carney said the lack of progress on other issues like missile defense and human rights also made it difficult to justify a 1-on-1 meeting. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will examine the factors that have led to the broader deterioration of US-Russia relations.
    * Terror threats have kept US embassies in Middle Eastern and African countries closed all week. The US has launched drone attacks targeting militants in Yemen while Yemeni security announced they foiled a plot by Al Qaeda to attack fuel pipelines and two of the nation's ports. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the intercepted Al Qaeda communications that lead to the terror alert and evacuation of US diplomatic posts overseas.
    * Plus Reid Wilson of The Washington Post will share what he calls "The Five Rules of Politics" and offer perspective on how both political parties are undergoing internal revolutions now that could play out in the next election cycle.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3133] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#104H] Obama's Russia snub, Oprah's new film and Jeff Bezos' big buy. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2517H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#108] My Louisiana Love This film traces a young woman's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to reunite with her Houma Indian family. But soon she sees that her people's traditional way of life is threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil leak are just the latest rounds in this century-old cycle that is forcing Monique's clan to adapt in new ways. Monique must overcome the loss of her house, her father, and her partner, and redefine the meaning of home. duration 1:17:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Natural Heroes [#505] The Edge of the Sea Since the late 1960's, Puerto Rico's small fishing villages have undergone expansive coastal development, driven by tourism and the growing demand for beachfront property. The Edge of the Sea follows a third generation fisherman in his battle against a developer planning to build a mega condo project on one of Rincon's most popular public beaches. This film explores both sides of the privatization of public areas, and the sensitive social and environmental consequences of excessive coastal development. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1649] SEQUENCING THE GENOME - Science has made rapid strides in genetic testing - especially in children - to understand serious birth defects or congenital abnormalities, or the child's predisposition to disease later in life. But as Lucky Severson reports, guidelines for the use of this technology are lacking, leaving the questions who should be tested, and how much should parents be told. (Originally aired January 25, 2013)
    BOBBY MCFERRIN - Ten-time Grammy Award-winning artist Bobby McFerrin has released a new album, "spirityouall," which includes his adaptions of traditional African-American spirituals and original devotional songs that he wrote. McFerrin says the new project reflects his deeply-held Christian faith and talks with Kim Lawton about spirituality and the power of music. (Originally aired May 24, 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1007] What It Takes Guest: Charles Ellis, Founder, Greenwich Associates; Author, "What It Takes". This week's WT features an exclusive interview with "Financial Thought Leader" Charles Ellis about "what it takes" to be the best in the business. Ellis shares 50 years of wisdom learned from advising firms and governments on where to invest. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#202H] Join Ric Edelman and his staff as they look at how the costs of flying in a private jet apply to everyday situations like leasing a new car. Ric also gives advice about 401Ks to a woman on a Manhattan sidewalk and quizzes fitness guru Denise Austin on the discipline needed to achieve financial fitness. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2517H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3133] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5306H] * In a rare diplomatic snub, the White House canceled next month's meeting between President Obama and Russian President Vladimir. The move follows Russia's decision to grant former NSA contractor Edward Snowden asylum. White House spokesperson Jay Carney said the lack of progress on other issues like missile defense and human rights also made it difficult to justify a 1-on-1 meeting. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will examine the factors that have led to the broader deterioration of US-Russia relations.
    * Terror threats have kept US embassies in Middle Eastern and African countries closed all week. The US has launched drone attacks targeting militants in Yemen while Yemeni security announced they foiled a plot by Al Qaeda to attack fuel pipelines and two of the nation's ports. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the intercepted Al Qaeda communications that lead to the terror alert and evacuation of US diplomatic posts overseas.
    * Plus Reid Wilson of The Washington Post will share what he calls "The Five Rules of Politics" and offer perspective on how both political parties are undergoing internal revolutions now that could play out in the next election cycle.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2439H] August 9, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    RICHMOND FIGHTS FORECLOSURES - Taking the foreclosure crisis into its own hands, the city of Richmond is threatening an unprecedented use of eminent domain to bail out residents with underwater mortgages. The move is being contested vigorously by banks, but proponents say it would allow residents to refinance their homes at current market values and prevent future foreclosures. Eminent domain is the acquisition of private property for public use.
    UNION NEGOTIATIONS - The threat of a second strike by BART workers this summer and other labor disputes have sparked debate about the role of unions and employers in guaranteeing middle class compensation and benefits. AC Transit, Alameda County's public transportation authority, also narrowly averted a strike this week.
    CHEVRON FIRE ANNIVERSARY - Protesters marked the one year anniversary of a fire at the Chevron refinery in Richmond that sent more than 15,000 area residents to hospitals complaining of respiratory problems. The oil giant pleaded no contest to 6 criminal charges of violating labor and health codes and agreed to pay $2 million in fines and restitution. Meanwhile, the city of Richmond is suing Chevron over the August 6, 2012 explosion for "neglect...and corporate indifference."
    "NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND" WAIVERS - San Francisco, Oakland, and six other California cities were granted waivers from the strict requirements and tough sanctions of the federal No Child Left Behind law. The school districts, which together encompass nearly one million students, have a year to re-allocate funding originally earmarked for tutoring and to implement an evaluation system that they proposed.
    Guests: Carolyn Said, San Francisco Chronicle; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; David Baker, San Francisco Chronicle; and Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    REMEMBERING ARTIST RUTH ASAWA - A look back at the life and work of pioneering Bay Area sculptor Ruth Asawa, who died this week at the age of 87. From KQED's archive, an excerpt from a 2005 Spark* profile showcases her creative process.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#231H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild * Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, Economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    * Also on the broadcast, activist and author Saru Jayaraman marches on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet, and talks about how we can best support their right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's 10 million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, an expose of the restaurant industry.
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2517H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3133] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2222H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#207] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:30 pm
    Natural Heroes [#505] The Edge of the Sea Since the late 1960's, Puerto Rico's small fishing villages have undergone expansive coastal development, driven by tourism and the growing demand for beachfront property. The Edge of the Sea follows a third generation fisherman in his battle against a developer planning to build a mega condo project on one of Rincon's most popular public beaches. This film explores both sides of the privatization of public areas, and the sensitive social and environmental consequences of excessive coastal development. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#104H] Obama's Russia snub, Oprah's new film and Jeff Bezos' big buy. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#231H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild * Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, Economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    * Also on the broadcast, activist and author Saru Jayaraman marches on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet, and talks about how we can best support their right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's 10 million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, an expose of the restaurant industry.
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5306H] * In a rare diplomatic snub, the White House canceled next month's meeting between President Obama and Russian President Vladimir. The move follows Russia's decision to grant former NSA contractor Edward Snowden asylum. White House spokesperson Jay Carney said the lack of progress on other issues like missile defense and human rights also made it difficult to justify a 1-on-1 meeting. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will examine the factors that have led to the broader deterioration of US-Russia relations.
    * Terror threats have kept US embassies in Middle Eastern and African countries closed all week. The US has launched drone attacks targeting militants in Yemen while Yemeni security announced they foiled a plot by Al Qaeda to attack fuel pipelines and two of the nation's ports. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the intercepted Al Qaeda communications that lead to the terror alert and evacuation of US diplomatic posts overseas.
    * Plus Reid Wilson of The Washington Post will share what he calls "The Five Rules of Politics" and offer perspective on how both political parties are undergoing internal revolutions now that could play out in the next election cycle.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2517H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3133] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2439H] August 9, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    RICHMOND FIGHTS FORECLOSURES - Taking the foreclosure crisis into its own hands, the city of Richmond is threatening an unprecedented use of eminent domain to bail out residents with underwater mortgages. The move is being contested vigorously by banks, but proponents say it would allow residents to refinance their homes at current market values and prevent future foreclosures. Eminent domain is the acquisition of private property for public use.
    UNION NEGOTIATIONS - The threat of a second strike by BART workers this summer and other labor disputes have sparked debate about the role of unions and employers in guaranteeing middle class compensation and benefits. AC Transit, Alameda County's public transportation authority, also narrowly averted a strike this week.
    CHEVRON FIRE ANNIVERSARY - Protesters marked the one year anniversary of a fire at the Chevron refinery in Richmond that sent more than 15,000 area residents to hospitals complaining of respiratory problems. The oil giant pleaded no contest to 6 criminal charges of violating labor and health codes and agreed to pay $2 million in fines and restitution. Meanwhile, the city of Richmond is suing Chevron over the August 6, 2012 explosion for "neglect...and corporate indifference."
    "NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND" WAIVERS - San Francisco, Oakland, and six other California cities were granted waivers from the strict requirements and tough sanctions of the federal No Child Left Behind law. The school districts, which together encompass nearly one million students, have a year to re-allocate funding originally earmarked for tutoring and to implement an evaluation system that they proposed.
    Guests: Carolyn Said, San Francisco Chronicle; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; David Baker, San Francisco Chronicle; and Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    REMEMBERING ARTIST RUTH ASAWA - A look back at the life and work of pioneering Bay Area sculptor Ruth Asawa, who died this week at the age of 87. From KQED's archive, an excerpt from a 2005 Spark* profile showcases her creative process.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Natural Heroes [#505] The Edge of the Sea Since the late 1960's, Puerto Rico's small fishing villages have undergone expansive coastal development, driven by tourism and the growing demand for beachfront property. The Edge of the Sea follows a third generation fisherman in his battle against a developer planning to build a mega condo project on one of Rincon's most popular public beaches. This film explores both sides of the privatization of public areas, and the sensitive social and environmental consequences of excessive coastal development. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 pm
    Aspen Institute Presents [#102] The Transformative Power of Technology Educators, policy-makers, and young inventers look at technology's innovative side. From its role in affecting education reform to mapping our cities to revolutionizing everyday lifestyle. duration 58:29   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#231H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild * Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, Economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    * Also on the broadcast, activist and author Saru Jayaraman marches on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet, and talks about how we can best support their right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's 10 million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, an expose of the restaurant industry.
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#118] Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin During his 60-year career as an activist, organizer and "troublemaker, " Bayard Rustin formulated many of the strategies that propelled the American civil rights movement. His passionate belief in Gandhi' s philosophy of nonviolence drew Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders to him in the 1940's and 50's; his practice of those beliefs drew the attention of the FBI and police. But his open homosexuality forced him to remain in the background, marking him again and again as a "brother outsider." Brother Outsider combines rare archival footage - some of it never before broadcast in the U.S. - with provocative interviews to illuminate the life and work of a forgotten prophet of social change. duration 1:50:44   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#611] In The Shadow of the Sun An intimate story about two very different members of a remote islands' albino community in Tanzania, as a wave of brutal killings targeting people with albinism sweeps their country. duration 1:26:02   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Sousa on the Rez: Marching to the Beat of a Different Drum Native American music may not conjure images of tubas, trumpets and John Phillip Sousa marches. Yet this vibrant musical tradition has been a part of Native American culture for more than 100 years. This program traces the origins of the 4 remaining multi-generational, community-based tribal bands: the Iroquois Indian Band from upstate New York, the Fort Mojave Tribal Band from Needles, Calif., the Zuni Pueblo Band from northwestern New Mexico and the Navajo Nation Band from Arizona. Combining profiles of contemporary bands with fresh historical research, it offers an unexpected and engaging picture of this little-known aspect of the Native music scene. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
Sunday, August 11, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too