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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, August 10, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 10, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10730] Obama * Russia Relations * Detroit * Brooks and Marcus * Goats duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32178] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the battle between J.C. Penney and one of its biggest investors is very public and very ugly. Is this kind of open boardroom warfare ever good for shareholders? And, more companies are bringing jobs back to the United States. But it's not just workers who benefit. NBR will tell you who else is reaping the rewards as we wrap up our special series "Made in America." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2964] Tavis talks with writer-director Joss Whedon, the man behind such acclaimed projects as The Avengers and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The Oscar-nominated writer and series showrunner talks about his latest projects: the film Much Ado About Nothing and the upcoming series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Originally aired on June 6, 2013) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Frontline [#3106H] Raising Adam Lanza In the wake of the Newtown school massacre, in a special collaboration with the Hartford Courant, Frontline examines the life of a young man and the town he changed forever.
    Adam Lanza left behind a trail of death and destruction, but little else. The mass killer had no known friends, no diary. He destroyed his computer and any evidence it might have provided. His motives, and his life, remain largely a mystery. In partnership with The Hartford Courant, Frontline looks for answers to the central, and so far elusive, question: "Who was Adam Lanza?"
    In the aftermath of the tragedy, President Obama called for a national conversation about guns in America. Nowhere is that conversation more intense than in Newtown itself.
    In a second story, Frontline visits Newtown, Connecticut to explore how those closest to the tragedy are now wrestling with our nation's gun culture and laws.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1649] SEQUENCING THE GENOME - Science has made rapid strides in genetic testing - especially in children - to understand serious birth defects or congenital abnormalities, or the child's predisposition to disease later in life. But as Lucky Severson reports, guidelines for the use of this technology are lacking, leaving the questions who should be tested, and how much should parents be told. (Originally aired January 25, 2013)
    BOBBY MCFERRIN - Ten-time Grammy Award-winning artist Bobby McFerrin has released a new album, "spirityouall," which includes his adaptions of traditional African-American spirituals and original devotional songs that he wrote. McFerrin says the new project reflects his deeply-held Christian faith and talks with Kim Lawton about spirituality and the power of music. (Originally aired May 24, 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1007] What It Takes Guest: Charles Ellis, Founder, Greenwich Associates; Author, "What It Takes". This week's WT features an exclusive interview with "Financial Thought Leader" Charles Ellis about "what it takes" to be the best in the business. Ellis shares 50 years of wisdom learned from advising firms and governments on where to invest. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2147] Special Edition - The Legacy of Hillary Clinton As Hillary Clinton leaves behind her work at the State Department, she sits down with host Bonnie Erbe to share her dedication and commitment to women and girls' empowerment. From First Lady to the US Senate to the State Department, Clinton guides us through her storied career with one common thread: issues facing women and girls. And, she tells us what's next for her. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#108] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Rock Prophecies duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    President's Photographer: Fifty Years Inside the Oval Office Pete Souza is never far behind President Obama. In fact, sometimes he's ahead of him. As the President's chief White House photographer, Souza is the President's shadow. Now, National Geographic will follow Souza inside the Obama White House--aboard Air Force One, backstage at the State of the Union, and into the heart of the West Wing. It's a behind-the-scenes look at the everyday grit of the American presidency and a chance to see what it's like to cover the most powerful man in the world, for history. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#231H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild * Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, Economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    * Also on the broadcast, activist and author Saru Jayaraman marches on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet, and talks about how we can best support their right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's 10 million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, an expose of the restaurant industry.
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#207] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2517H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5306H] * In a rare diplomatic snub, the White House canceled next month's meeting between President Obama and Russian President Vladimir. The move follows Russia's decision to grant former NSA contractor Edward Snowden asylum. White House spokesperson Jay Carney said the lack of progress on other issues like missile defense and human rights also made it difficult to justify a 1-on-1 meeting. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will examine the factors that have led to the broader deterioration of US-Russia relations.
    * Terror threats have kept US embassies in Middle Eastern and African countries closed all week. The US has launched drone attacks targeting militants in Yemen while Yemeni security announced they foiled a plot by Al Qaeda to attack fuel pipelines and two of the nation's ports. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the intercepted Al Qaeda communications that lead to the terror alert and evacuation of US diplomatic posts overseas.
    * Plus Reid Wilson of The Washington Post will share what he calls "The Five Rules of Politics" and offer perspective on how both political parties are undergoing internal revolutions now that could play out in the next election cycle.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2439H] August 9, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    RICHMOND FIGHTS FORECLOSURES - Taking the foreclosure crisis into its own hands, the city of Richmond is threatening an unprecedented use of eminent domain to bail out residents with underwater mortgages. The move is being contested vigorously by banks, but proponents say it would allow residents to refinance their homes at current market values and prevent future foreclosures. Eminent domain is the acquisition of private property for public use.
    UNION NEGOTIATIONS - The threat of a second strike by BART workers this summer and other labor disputes have sparked debate about the role of unions and employers in guaranteeing middle class compensation and benefits. AC Transit, Alameda County's public transportation authority, also narrowly averted a strike this week.
    CHEVRON FIRE ANNIVERSARY - Protesters marked the one year anniversary of a fire at the Chevron refinery in Richmond that sent more than 15,000 area residents to hospitals complaining of respiratory problems. The oil giant pleaded no contest to 6 criminal charges of violating labor and health codes and agreed to pay $2 million in fines and restitution. Meanwhile, the city of Richmond is suing Chevron over the August 6, 2012 explosion for "neglect...and corporate indifference."
    "NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND" WAIVERS - San Francisco, Oakland, and six other California cities were granted waivers from the strict requirements and tough sanctions of the federal No Child Left Behind law. The school districts, which together encompass nearly one million students, have a year to re-allocate funding originally earmarked for tutoring and to implement an evaluation system that they proposed.
    Guests: Carolyn Said, San Francisco Chronicle; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; David Baker, San Francisco Chronicle; and Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    REMEMBERING ARTIST RUTH ASAWA - A look back at the life and work of pioneering Bay Area sculptor Ruth Asawa, who died this week at the age of 87. From KQED's archive, an excerpt from a 2005 Spark* profile showcases her creative process.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17221Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2222H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3133] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#104H] Obama's Russia snub, Oprah's new film and Jeff Bezos' big buy. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#231H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild * Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, Economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    * Also on the broadcast, activist and author Saru Jayaraman marches on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet, and talks about how we can best support their right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's 10 million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, an expose of the restaurant industry.
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Natural Heroes [#505] The Edge of the Sea Since the late 1960's, Puerto Rico's small fishing villages have undergone expansive coastal development, driven by tourism and the growing demand for beachfront property. The Edge of the Sea follows a third generation fisherman in his battle against a developer planning to build a mega condo project on one of Rincon's most popular public beaches. This film explores both sides of the privatization of public areas, and the sensitive social and environmental consequences of excessive coastal development. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#233] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1201H] The Man Who Saved The World This program follows the drama and debate that surrounded the most critical point in the Cold War, and perhaps human history. While politicians desperately sought a solution to the stand-off, nobody was aware what was happening beneath the waves but the men on the B-59. The crew could only watch as their superiors entered a battle of wills that would determine the fate of humanity. The story of what happened that fateful day remained hidden for decades, only emerging in Russia in recent years. Now these events will be known to the world. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Cuban Missile Crisis: Three Men Go to War This film tells the inside story of the Cuban Missile Crisis, exploring how in October 1962 the earth teetered on the very brink of nuclear holocaust. The documentary brings to life the three central characters John F. Kennedy, Fidel Castro and Nikita Khrushchev, and explores how the world's most powerful men fell into an abyss of their own making and what courage and luck it took to climb out again. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    History Detectives [#501Z] 3-D Cuban Missile Crisis/Amos 'n' Andy Record/Women's Suffrage Painting * 3-D Cuban Missile Crisis - A woman in Portland, Oregon, has a portable projection screen that may have helped save the Free World. It came her way with a letter stating that in 1962, it was borrowed from a club of 3-D photography enthusiasts in Dayton, Ohio, to show President John F. Kennedy the aerial spy photos that helped him resolve the Cuban Missile Crisis. Is it possible that, as the world faced nuclear Armageddon, the US Air Force turned to an amateur club to help identify Russian missiles? HD visits Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and learns how the world's first supersonic photo-recon aircraft was rigged with 3-D cameras to improve its view of Cuba's camouflaged missiles. Wes Cowan leads HD to Dayton, Washington, DC, and Portland to pursue the case of this unassuming screen that may have played a role in preventing World War III.
    * Amos 'n' Andy Record - A man in Lakeland, Florida, purchased at a flea market an aluminum record with the words "Amos 'n' Andy" hand-written on its label. He is eager to learn whether this is a rare early recording of the old-time radio series. At the peak of its success, 40 million listeners - a third of America - tuned in to "Amos 'n' Andy" six nights a week, making it the longest-running and most popular radio program in broadcast history. Its creators, Correll and Gosden, were white men who made a career of impersonating blacks for comic effect. In New York City, host Tukufu Zuberi uncovers a complex portrait of 1930s race relations and the emerging power of the mass media in American popular culture.
    * Women's Suffrage Painting - 20 years ago, a woman from League City, Texas, bought at a garage sale what appears to be a watercolor painting. Pictured is a trumpeting herald on a horse, and printed are the words "Official Program Woman Suffrage Procession Washington DC March 3, 1913." The contributor wants to learn if this image is the original for that program and what role it played in securing women the right to vote. The investigation sheds light on the day before Woodrow Wilson's presidential inauguration, when as many as 8,000 women descended on the steps of the US Capitol, marching for suffrage. National media accounts testify to the galvanizing effect the spectacle had on the public. Remarkably, though, the event was organized in just nine weeks. In the suffragettes' rush to define their image, who was the illustrator they turned to? In Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Washington, DC, host Gwen Wright searches for the mystery artist whose work helped culminate the 72- year battle for women's suffrage.
    duration 55:22   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Rock Prophecies duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3133] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5306H] * In a rare diplomatic snub, the White House canceled next month's meeting between President Obama and Russian President Vladimir. The move follows Russia's decision to grant former NSA contractor Edward Snowden asylum. White House spokesperson Jay Carney said the lack of progress on other issues like missile defense and human rights also made it difficult to justify a 1-on-1 meeting. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will examine the factors that have led to the broader deterioration of US-Russia relations.
    * Terror threats have kept US embassies in Middle Eastern and African countries closed all week. The US has launched drone attacks targeting militants in Yemen while Yemeni security announced they foiled a plot by Al Qaeda to attack fuel pipelines and two of the nation's ports. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the intercepted Al Qaeda communications that lead to the terror alert and evacuation of US diplomatic posts overseas.
    * Plus Reid Wilson of The Washington Post will share what he calls "The Five Rules of Politics" and offer perspective on how both political parties are undergoing internal revolutions now that could play out in the next election cycle.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2439H] August 9, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    RICHMOND FIGHTS FORECLOSURES - Taking the foreclosure crisis into its own hands, the city of Richmond is threatening an unprecedented use of eminent domain to bail out residents with underwater mortgages. The move is being contested vigorously by banks, but proponents say it would allow residents to refinance their homes at current market values and prevent future foreclosures. Eminent domain is the acquisition of private property for public use.
    UNION NEGOTIATIONS - The threat of a second strike by BART workers this summer and other labor disputes have sparked debate about the role of unions and employers in guaranteeing middle class compensation and benefits. AC Transit, Alameda County's public transportation authority, also narrowly averted a strike this week.
    CHEVRON FIRE ANNIVERSARY - Protesters marked the one year anniversary of a fire at the Chevron refinery in Richmond that sent more than 15,000 area residents to hospitals complaining of respiratory problems. The oil giant pleaded no contest to 6 criminal charges of violating labor and health codes and agreed to pay $2 million in fines and restitution. Meanwhile, the city of Richmond is suing Chevron over the August 6, 2012 explosion for "neglect...and corporate indifference."
    "NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND" WAIVERS - San Francisco, Oakland, and six other California cities were granted waivers from the strict requirements and tough sanctions of the federal No Child Left Behind law. The school districts, which together encompass nearly one million students, have a year to re-allocate funding originally earmarked for tutoring and to implement an evaluation system that they proposed.
    Guests: Carolyn Said, San Francisco Chronicle; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; David Baker, San Francisco Chronicle; and Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    REMEMBERING ARTIST RUTH ASAWA - A look back at the life and work of pioneering Bay Area sculptor Ruth Asawa, who died this week at the age of 87. From KQED's archive, an excerpt from a 2005 Spark* profile showcases her creative process.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Natural Heroes [#505] The Edge of the Sea Since the late 1960's, Puerto Rico's small fishing villages have undergone expansive coastal development, driven by tourism and the growing demand for beachfront property. The Edge of the Sea follows a third generation fisherman in his battle against a developer planning to build a mega condo project on one of Rincon's most popular public beaches. This film explores both sides of the privatization of public areas, and the sensitive social and environmental consequences of excessive coastal development. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1218] Nigeria Adela Ucar kicks off her visit in the capital of Lagos, an anarchic and electric city with a vital night life. Next she journeys to Yoruba Land in the southwest, thought to be the site of the Queen of Sheba's tomb. Adela later meets witch doctors in Oyo, travels to the historic walled cities in the north, hunts for bargains in the ancient Kurmi Market, visits the traditional Fulani village of Chafe and encounters a rare mountain gorilla in Nigeria's eastern highlands. duration 57:53   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2901] Radioactive Wolves The historic nuclear accident at Chernobyl is now 25 years old. Filmmakers and scientists set out to document the lives of the packs of wolves and other wildlife thriving in the "dead zone" that still surrounds the remains of the reactor. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3616H] Lizard Kings They look like dragons. Armed with sharp teeth, tearing claws and a whip-like tail, these fearsome creatures are not only powerful, they're also smart. Top predators with intelligence, who learn as they hunt, and who use their brain to track down prey, no matter what. Sounds like these cunning hunters should be a big-brained mammal, but these creatures are reptiles, members of a family that evolved when the dinosaurs roamed the earth. They are the largest lizards still walking the planet, the monitor lizards -- the Lizard Kings. duration 55:21   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1201H] The Man Who Saved The World This program follows the drama and debate that surrounded the most critical point in the Cold War, and perhaps human history. While politicians desperately sought a solution to the stand-off, nobody was aware what was happening beneath the waves but the men on the B-59. The crew could only watch as their superiors entered a battle of wills that would determine the fate of humanity. The story of what happened that fateful day remained hidden for decades, only emerging in Russia in recent years. Now these events will be known to the world. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#108] My Louisiana Love This film traces a young woman's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to reunite with her Houma Indian family. But soon she sees that her people's traditional way of life is threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil leak are just the latest rounds in this century-old cycle that is forcing Monique's clan to adapt in new ways. Monique must overcome the loss of her house, her father, and her partner, and redefine the meaning of home. duration 1:17:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, August 10, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too