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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, July 27, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, July 27, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10720] Manning Trial * Halliburton * Protests in North Africa * Fukushima * Shields and Brooks Examine the Week's News duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32168Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, who will be the next person to lead the world's most powerful central bank? The answer could impact not only your savings, but also your investments. And, is it possible to turn your passion into a paycheck later in life? NBR's series on how to not outlive your money wraps up tonight with a look at successful second acts. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2954] Tavis talks with Sir Ben Kingsley about his latest film role. The Oscar-winning actor discusses his villainous role in the latest installment of Marvel Comics' Iron Man action adventure feature series. (Originally aired on May 2, 2013) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1104] The World's Biggest Bomb Beginning in the 1950s, American and Soviet scientists engaged in a dangerous race to see who could build and detonate the world's largest bomb. The results exceeded all expectations about how big a bomb could be built. This is a story where the United States led the way, but then left the field clear for the Soviet Union to break all records. Terrifyingly, the bomb-makers on both sides were flying blind as they pushed the technology far into unknown territory. The story of the race to build the world's biggest bomb has never been fully told. But this 50-year anniversary provides the perfect opportunity share this chilling story with the world. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1647] AMERICA'S RESILIENT SIKHS - One year after the mass shooting of Sikh worshippers in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, Sikh leaders tell Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly's Managing Editor Kim Lawton that their community has become stronger since the attack, with more optimism and hope. Sikh leaders are campaigning nationally to get more protection from hate crimes and racial profiling. They are also lobbying for Pentagon permission for Sikhs in the military to wear their traditional turbans and unshorn hair.
    THE CONTEMPORARY ART OF TOBI KAHN - At his studio in Long Island City, Kahn creates a vast variety of modern artwork ? glazed wooden boxes, synagogue murals, small flowers and huge installations ? all with an awareness of the spiritual dimension of his work. And, as Kahn told correspondent Bob Faw, he has found that his work can bring peace to those at the end of their lives.
    POPE FRANCIS'S TRIP TO BRAZIL - Pope Francis traveled to Brazil for World Youth Day this week, his first international trip since becoming pope in March. How did his message of poverty and humility resonate with Catholics there and what challenges did he face in the Catholic country that is now experiencing an increase of evangelicals? Host Bob Abernethy speaks with Father Tom Reese, senior analyst for the National Catholic Reporter.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1005] The New Retirement Conversation This week: WT guides you through the new retirement conversation. With traditional pension funds rapidly disappearing, what are the new building blocks for a secure retirement? Personal finance experts Mary Beth Franklin and Kim Lankford discuss the essentials and explain why insurance could become the next big retirement tool. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2220H] Efforts to save the lives of women and children by increasing access to maternal and child care. This special documentary includes interviews with Melinda Gates, Co-founder of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Global Health Corps CEO Barbara Bush; Population Services International Global Ambassador Mandy Moore; and many more women on their work. (repeat) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#207] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Buddha Two and a half millennia ago, a new religion was born in northern India, generated from the ideas of a single man, the Buddha. He was a mysterious Indian sage who famously gained enlightenment while he sat under a big, shapely fig tree. The Buddha never claimed to be God or his emissary on earth. He said only that he was a human being who, in a world of unavoidable pain and suffering, had found a kind of serenity that others could find too. Award-winning filmmaker David Grubin tells the story of the Buddha's life, a journey especially relevant to our own bewildering times of violent change and spiritual confusion. This documentary draws upon the work of some of the world's greatest artists and sculptors, who across two millennia have depicted the Buddha's life in art rich in beauty and complexity. His biography is also tracked geographically across the sweeping landscapes of northern India. The testimony of contemporary Buddhists - including Pulitzer prize-winning poet W.S. Merwin and His Holiness the Dalai Lama - provides insight into the ancient narrative. To tell his story is to understand his teaching. And to understand his teaching is to gain new insight into what it is to be human. duration 1:55:07   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#229H] John Lewis Marches On This week, two icons of the 60's civil rights era - Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) - meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington which they both attended 50 years ago.
    Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attract the attention of schoolchildren, and conduct a spontaneous living history lesson.
    The March on Washington is largely remembered for King's "I Have a Dream" speech. The 23-year-old Lewis, newly named to lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest of the featured speakers, but among the most defiant.
    Now a 14-term congressman from Georgia, Lewis shares new insight into how the event unfolded - including last-minute conflicts over his own manuscript. He also discusses the continuing challenges to racial and economic equality, and his unwavering dedication to nonviolence and brotherly love as a means toward a more just end - even when facing inevitable violence and brutality.
    "To look out and see the best of America convinced me more than anything else that this is the product, this is the work of the movement," Lewis tells Moyers. "Sometimes you have to not just dream about what could be - you get out and push and you pull and you preach. And you create a climate and environment to get those in high places, to get men and women of good will in power to act."
    Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers - who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time - also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans - so championed at the March on Washington - continues to be thwarted.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#152] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2515H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5304H] * President Obama appears to be gearing up for yet another showdown with Congress over the federal budget. In a series of small town speeches this week, President Obama pledged to focus the rest of his time in office on helping working-class Americans. He defended his domestic policy agenda and accused Republicans of trying to undermine his efforts to bolster the economy with an "endless parade of distractions, political posturing and phony scandals." House Speaker John Boehner pushed back saying the White House wasn't offering any new ideas and that the president's speeches were "more sizzle than steak." John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will report on the battles that are brewing and how Americans have soured on Washington.
    * Last month the Supreme Court struck down a key part of the landmark Voting Rights Act aimed at preventing voter discrimination. Today, Attorney General Eric Holder reasserted the Justice Department's role in policing voting laws by asking a federal court in Texas to force that state to get pre-approval before making any redistricting changes. Republican Texas Governor Rick Perry said the move showed "utter contempt for the Constitution." Carrie Johnson of NPR will look at the other states where the Justice Department plans to take similar action to protect voters' rights.
    * Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top secret information on US surveillance practices, may be leaving the Moscow airport where he's been living for the past month. He's applied for political asylum in Russia to avoid facing espionage charges in the US. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on American concerns about the intelligence Snowden still has in his possession and the growing wedge in US-Russian relations in wake of this international situation.
    * Plus, Molly Ball of The Atlantic will take a closer look at Anthony Weiner's bid to be mayor of New York after admitting he was involved in inappropriate online relationships with multiple women since resigning in disgrace from Congress, and how his wife has chosen to come to his defense.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Life After War: California Veterans KQED / Center for Investigative Journalism Special An in-depth look at some of the challenges faced by members of the armed forces when they return home from serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. The program goes from Los Angeles' Skid Row, where women vets struggle with homelessness in the transition to civilian life, to San Francisco, where veterans suffering from Military Sexual Trauma can seek treatment at the VA Medical Center. Also, an innovative program at City College of San Francisco helps veterans succeed when they go back to school. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17207Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2220H] Efforts to save the lives of women and children by increasing access to maternal and child care. This special documentary includes interviews with Melinda Gates, Co-founder of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Global Health Corps CEO Barbara Bush; Population Services International Global Ambassador Mandy Moore; and many more women on their work. (repeat) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3131] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#102H] Charlie recaps the major events of the week and sheds new light on the stories and ideas that shape our world. Joining him: Mike Allen, David Leonhardt, Cate Blanchett, and more. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#229H] John Lewis Marches On This week, two icons of the 60's civil rights era - Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) - meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington which they both attended 50 years ago.
    Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attract the attention of schoolchildren, and conduct a spontaneous living history lesson.
    The March on Washington is largely remembered for King's "I Have a Dream" speech. The 23-year-old Lewis, newly named to lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest of the featured speakers, but among the most defiant.
    Now a 14-term congressman from Georgia, Lewis shares new insight into how the event unfolded - including last-minute conflicts over his own manuscript. He also discusses the continuing challenges to racial and economic equality, and his unwavering dedication to nonviolence and brotherly love as a means toward a more just end - even when facing inevitable violence and brutality.
    "To look out and see the best of America convinced me more than anything else that this is the product, this is the work of the movement," Lewis tells Moyers. "Sometimes you have to not just dream about what could be - you get out and push and you pull and you preach. And you create a climate and environment to get those in high places, to get men and women of good will in power to act."
    Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers - who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time - also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans - so championed at the March on Washington - continues to be thwarted.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Hawaii: Roots of Fire This documentary goes down below the Hawaiian Islands in a search for the hidden forces that drive the planet's largest and most active volcanic system. It follows earth scientists as they work among the volcanoes of the Big Island of Hawaii, pursuing clues and compiling evidence in a quest to shed new light on the mysterious inner Earth process that has been producing giant volcanoes in the middle of the Pacific Ocean for more than 75 million years.
    Scientists have long been puzzled over the source of the huge quantities of lava erupting out of Hawaii's massive volcanoes. Does the lava come from just below the Earth's crust? Or does it come from much deeper, perhaps even as far down as the Earth's core, some 1800 miles below the surface? The film focuses on an international team of scientists who boldly take on these key questions with a major drilling project into the flanks of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest volcano. As their work progresses, another group of scientists embarks on a huge seismic study that deploys instruments on the islands and the seafloor surrounding them. After years of painstaking research, startling new discoveries are made. Not only do the scientists determine where the lava is coming from, but they solve other long-standing mysteries about the workings of Hawaii's magnificent volcanoes.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#231] duration 25:40   TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    POV [#2605H] High Tech, Low Life "High Tech, Low Life" follows two of China's first citizen-reporters as they document the underside of the country's rapid economic development. A search for truth and fame inspires young vegetable seller "Zola" to report on censored news stories from the cities, while retired businessman "Tiger Temple" makes sense of the past by chronicling the struggles of rural villagers. Land grabs, pollution, rising poverty, local corruption and the growing willingness of ordinary people to speak out are grist for these two bloggers who navigate China's evolving censorship regulations and challenge the boundaries of free speech. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:30 pm
    Alan Alda in Scientific American Frontiers [#1510] Robot Pals To be really useful, robots need to behave as cooperative partners rather than mindless machines. Meet three robots - Ripley, Leonardo the Lovable, and Robonaut, a future member of an astronaut team - that are trying to better understand us. duration 26:25   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Intelligence Squared [#103H] Does Science Refute God? On the fundamental question--evolution or creation?--Americans are on the fence. According to one survey, while 61% of Americans believe we have evolved over time, 22% believe this evolution was guided by a higher power, with another 31% on the side of creationism. For some, modern science debunks many of religion's core beliefs, but for others, questions like "Why are we here?" and "How did it all come about?" can only be answered through a belief in the existence of God. Can science and religion co-exist? duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1206] Bones of the Buddha This show is a modern day Indiana Jones story: a tale of deception, treasure, intrepid adventurers and international realpolitik. Did a 19th-century British landowner really discover gold, jewels and the charred bones of the Lord Buddha in an underground chamber on his estate? When Colonial estate manager, Willie Peppe, set his workers digging at a mysterious hill in Northern India in 1898, he had no idea what they'd find. Just over 20 feet down, they made an amazing discovery: a huge stone coffer, containing five reliquary jars, over 1000 separate jewels, and some ash and bone. One of the jars had an inscription that appeared to say that these were the remains of the Buddha himself. This seemed to be the most extraordinary find in Indian archaeology. But doubt and scandal have hung over this amazing find for over 100 years. For some, the whole thing is an elaborate hoax. For others, it is no less than the final resting place of the leader of one of the world's great religions, who died nearly 2,500 years ago. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3131] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5304H] * President Obama appears to be gearing up for yet another showdown with Congress over the federal budget. In a series of small town speeches this week, President Obama pledged to focus the rest of his time in office on helping working-class Americans. He defended his domestic policy agenda and accused Republicans of trying to undermine his efforts to bolster the economy with an "endless parade of distractions, political posturing and phony scandals." House Speaker John Boehner pushed back saying the White House wasn't offering any new ideas and that the president's speeches were "more sizzle than steak." John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will report on the battles that are brewing and how Americans have soured on Washington.
    * Last month the Supreme Court struck down a key part of the landmark Voting Rights Act aimed at preventing voter discrimination. Today, Attorney General Eric Holder reasserted the Justice Department's role in policing voting laws by asking a federal court in Texas to force that state to get pre-approval before making any redistricting changes. Republican Texas Governor Rick Perry said the move showed "utter contempt for the Constitution." Carrie Johnson of NPR will look at the other states where the Justice Department plans to take similar action to protect voters' rights.
    * Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top secret information on US surveillance practices, may be leaving the Moscow airport where he's been living for the past month. He's applied for political asylum in Russia to avoid facing espionage charges in the US. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on American concerns about the intelligence Snowden still has in his possession and the growing wedge in US-Russian relations in wake of this international situation.
    * Plus, Molly Ball of The Atlantic will take a closer look at Anthony Weiner's bid to be mayor of New York after admitting he was involved in inappropriate online relationships with multiple women since resigning in disgrace from Congress, and how his wife has chosen to come to his defense.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Life After War: California Veterans KQED / Center for Investigative Journalism Special An in-depth look at some of the challenges faced by members of the armed forces when they return home from serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. The program goes from Los Angeles' Skid Row, where women vets struggle with homelessness in the transition to civilian life, to San Francisco, where veterans suffering from Military Sexual Trauma can seek treatment at the VA Medical Center. Also, an innovative program at City College of San Francisco helps veterans succeed when they go back to school. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:30 pm
    Hawaii: Roots of Fire This documentary goes down below the Hawaiian Islands in a search for the hidden forces that drive the planet's largest and most active volcanic system. It follows earth scientists as they work among the volcanoes of the Big Island of Hawaii, pursuing clues and compiling evidence in a quest to shed new light on the mysterious inner Earth process that has been producing giant volcanoes in the middle of the Pacific Ocean for more than 75 million years.
    Scientists have long been puzzled over the source of the huge quantities of lava erupting out of Hawaii's massive volcanoes. Does the lava come from just below the Earth's crust? Or does it come from much deeper, perhaps even as far down as the Earth's core, some 1800 miles below the surface? The film focuses on an international team of scientists who boldly take on these key questions with a major drilling project into the flanks of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest volcano. As their work progresses, another group of scientists embarks on a huge seismic study that deploys instruments on the islands and the seafloor surrounding them. After years of painstaking research, startling new discoveries are made. Not only do the scientists determine where the lava is coming from, but they solve other long-standing mysteries about the workings of Hawaii's magnificent volcanoes.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1216] Scotland Megan journeys to Glasgow, where she visits the Macintosh Museum and takes a bagpipe lesson. Next she travels to Stirling, site of a major victory by William "Braveheart" Wallace, Scotland's national hero. Megan samples the whiskey on the island of Islay, explores the mountainous region of Oben, goes fishing off the Isle of Skye, tours the battlefield of Culloden and pursues the myth of the Loch Ness Monster. She then travels to Strathdon for the Clanloddoch Highland games, witnesses an Orkadian wedding in Skara Brae, hits the links at St. Andrews and revels in the performances at the Edinburgh Festival. duration 56:43   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3001H] Siberian Tiger Quest Chris Morgan has tracked large predators in some of the wildest and most remote places on Earth. He now embarks on his greatest challenge - to find and film the Siberian tiger living wild and free in Russia's far eastern forests. This film features the work of Korean cameraman, Sooyong Park, who spent two years in the forest tracking and filming the world's biggest cat. Park's tracking technique was very unconventional. He dug himself into an underground pit and, incredibly, waited there for weeks at a time, hoping for a glimpse of a wild tiger. Morgan adopts the same method while he shares with us firsthand the difficulty of seeing the rare Siberian tiger. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3903#] 3D Spies of WWII Hitler's scientists developed terrifying new weapons of mass destruction. Alarmed by rumors about advanced rockets and missiles, Allied intelligence recruited a team of brilliant minds from British universities and Hollywood studios to a country house near London. Here, they secretly pored over millions of air photos shot at great risk over German territory by specially converted, high-flying Spitfires. Peering at the photos through 3D stereoscopes, the team spotted telltale clues that revealed hidden Nazi rocket bases. The photos led to devastating Allied bombing raids that were crucial setbacks to the German rocket program and helped ensure the success of the D-Day landings. With 3D graphics that recreate exactly what the photo spies saw, NOVA tells the suspenseful, previously untold story of air photo intelligence that played a vital role in defeating Hitler. duration 56:17   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Nazi Mega Weapons [#102H] U-Boat Base To create a haven in port for their lethal U-boat submarines, the Nazis built massive, impenetrable concrete submarine pens. Structures too immense to be hidden, they were constructed to withstand direct hits from even the biggest Allied bombs. Such was their size and strength that these pens survive today, a testament to their engineering. duration 54:01   SRND51 TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#117] New Muslim Cool Puerto Rican-American rapper Hamza P?rez pulled himself out of drug dealing and street life 12 years ago and became a Muslim. Now he's moved to Pittsburgh's tough North Side to start a new religious community, rebuild his shattered family and take his message of faith to other young people through hard-hitting hip-hop music. But when the FBI raids his mosque, Hamza must confront the realities of the post-9/11 world, and himself. New Muslim Cool takes viewers on Hamza's ride through streets, slums and jail cells; following his spiritual journey to some surprising places in an America that never stops changing. Produced in association with Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) and the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM). duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, July 27, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

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KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too