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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, July 21, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, July 21, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#119] After Happily Ever After Emmy winning filmmaker Kate Schermerhorn's quirky, funny and movingpersonal quest for the secret to a happy marriage and for answers to some timely questions about an institution which might just be due for some review. This engaging doc features an eclectic mix of long married couples - from a couple who dress alike every day; to a pair of nudists and a newlywed pair of mothers, to a feisty English widow. A lively and world-renowned group of marriage experts - including psychologist John Gottman (who can predict divorce with 90% accuracy), marrriage historian Stephanie Coontz, and a Beverly Hills divorce attorney, ground the film in fact as they piece together the history and possible future and motivations for marriage. Along the way, Schermerhorn chronicles the joys and heartbreaks of her own marriage and finds that even the best advice can?t always guarantee a happily ever after. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Question One "Question One" is a probing and insightful look at one of the most bitterly divisive and issues facing our nation today - same sex marriage. Award winning journalists, Joe Fox and James Nubile got unprecedented access to cover both sides of Maine's historic 2009 marriage referendum election. The result is a searing documentary that brings us up close and personal to one election, that tore a state apart and was instrumental in shaping the national landscape of this fast evolving civil rights issue. In war room style fashion, "Question One" has done what no other film has; chronicles the behind-the scenes workings of the pro and anti same-sex marriage campaigns as they fought for the hearts, minds and votes of the people of Maine. For three months, the filmmakers imbedded themselves in war rooms and strategy sessions as they captured the private thoughts, fears and conflicts expressed by key leaders as well as followed the foot soldiers and volunteers as they knocked on countless doors and made endless phone calls in an attempt to persuade and plead their neighbors and strangers to vote yes or no on "Question One". duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#220] Sarah's Picks Sarah's Picks: 2010 National Teacher of the Year, Sarah Brown Wessling, chooses 12 videos from Teaching Channel's library that she comes back to over and over. In this episode, she shares why she finds each of the videos useful and inspirational. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#228H] A New Case for Gun Control * The death of Trayvon Martin has ignited debate not just over our justice system, but on legislation such as the "stand your ground" laws that contributed to the tragic result. This week, Bill talks with author and gun control advocate Tom Diaz about how a lethal combination of self-defense laws and concealed carry laws - championed by the NRA and the gun industry - dilutes our legal protections against gun violence. He warns that the genie is out of the bottle and we should be gravely concerned about the unrelenting marketing of guns. Diaz's latest book is The Last Gun: How Changes in the Gun Industry Are Killing Americans and What It Will Take to Stop It.
    * Also on the show, a hard look at the plight of the men and women who bend to the earth in backbreaking labor, picking fruits, vegetables, and tobacco. Despite miracles of agricultural progress and innovation over the decades, the harsh lives and working conditions of migrant laborers have changed very little. Their cause has been championed in the past by Edward Murrow, Cesar Chavez, and the United Farmworkers, but that list is incomplete without Baldemar Velasquez. Velasquez was among hundreds of thousands of children who joined their migrant parents working long hours in the fields. Inspired by that early experience, Velasquez founded the Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC) in 1967. A 1989 MacArthur Fellow, Velasquez joins Bill to talk about the ongoing David vs. Goliath struggles to ensure fairness for American farmworkers.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5303H] * It's been nearly a week since a Florida jury acquitted George Zimmerman for the death of Trayvon Martin. Following the verdict, Attorney General Eric Holder repeated his pledge to continue a federal investigation into the 17-year-old's death. He also sharply criticized Florida's "Stand Your Ground" self-defense law. Pierre Thomas of ABC News will report on the aftermath of the Zimmerman not-guilty verdict.
    * At the White House today, President Obama forged ahead in promoting parts of his signature health care legislation set to go into effect this October. At the same time congressional Republicans continued their push to repeal the law or at least delay or dismantle it. What's going on? David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will explain why the debate over the Affordable Care Act has continued a year after becoming law.
    * Earlier in the week on Capitol Hill, a rare bipartisan compromise in the Senate led to a tentative deal to avoid the so-called "nuclear option" on filibuster rules. The agreement cleared the way for the confirmation of a handful of presidential nominees whose nominations had been languishing. But will the spirit of bipartisanship extend to the coming battles over the budget and debt-ceiling? We'll get answers and analysis from Charles Babington of the Associated Press.
    * Plus, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report will take a closer look at Liz Cheney's bid to unseat fellow Republican and three-term Senator Mike Enzi of Wyoming and the landscape for the 2014 mid-term elections.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3130] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#101H] Iconic interviewer Charlie Rose brings his unique style to the weekends with the best stories and interviews of the past week, featuring the defining moments in - and conversations about - the news, the sciences, the arts and entertainment.
    This week: Charlie takes a look at the Trayvon Martin verdict and America's evolving discussion on race; we revisit our conversation with J.K. Rowling in light of her suprising new novel; and columnist Tom Friedman shares with us his favorite film.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2514H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#119] After Happily Ever After Emmy winning filmmaker Kate Schermerhorn's quirky, funny and movingpersonal quest for the secret to a happy marriage and for answers to some timely questions about an institution which might just be due for some review. This engaging doc features an eclectic mix of long married couples - from a couple who dress alike every day; to a pair of nudists and a newlywed pair of mothers, to a feisty English widow. A lively and world-renowned group of marriage experts - including psychologist John Gottman (who can predict divorce with 90% accuracy), marrriage historian Stephanie Coontz, and a Beverly Hills divorce attorney, ground the film in fact as they piece together the history and possible future and motivations for marriage. Along the way, Schermerhorn chronicles the joys and heartbreaks of her own marriage and finds that even the best advice can?t always guarantee a happily ever after. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3128] Putin's Revenge ITALY: RESISTANCE AGAINST US SATELLITE NETWORK - There have been fierce protests against a planned satellite-based telecommunications system near the hub of US naval air operations in the Mediterranean. Local residents want the American forces out. In the small town of Niscemi on Sicily, thousand of people have been demonstrating for months against the installation of a new satellite-based telecommunication system for the US navy that would facilitate the worldwide deployment of drones. In the middle of a nature reserve on Niscemi's town limits, huge satellite dishes have been installed since early this year. Many of the protesters are women - mothers who fear the electromagnetic radiation could affect the health of their children.
    BELGIUM: TAKING A CREATIVE TURN - Brussels has already made a name for itself as a stronghold of planning lunacy. But the de facto capital of the European Union has another side to it - and it's a rather creative one. Stairs that lead into a wall, truly perplexing bicycle lane markings, zebra crossings to no-man's-land: it's all here in Brussels. In a city where most everything is precisely measured, calculated and standardized at the behest of the EU, some residents take a more creative and relaxed approach. A German artist has collect the quirkiest examples and posted them online as "Belgian solutions."
    RUSSIA: CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIVISTS UNDER PRESSURE - The Russian government is taking an increasingly hard line against non-profit organizations. The crackdown has now hit two prestigious institutes. They're the most severe sanctions the Russian justice ministry has carried out under the controversial Russian foreign agent law thus far. First Russian special units raided the offices of prominent human rights activist Lev Ponomaryov and forcibly evicted the staff. Then Golos, Russia's only independent election watchdog, was forced to cease work for six months. The two high-profile NGOs had refused to register as foreign agents under the new law, fearing they would be branded as spies.
    TURKEY: THE GEZI GENERATION - Despite police violence, the demonstrations in Turkey continue. The protests that began spontaneously three weeks ago have turned into a movement that aims to create permanent change. If Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan is to be believed, the protest movement is a flash in the pan, sponsored by foreign forces and infiltrated by left-wing terrorist groups. But many observers see instead the awakening of a new civil society. It's not just students and intellectuals who are taking to the streets - they've been joined by families with children, trade unionists and women wearing headscarves. What unites them is their persistence and creativity. Many Turks are now worried their country could lose its connection to Europe completely in a haze of tear gas.
    SPAIN: RELAXING COASTAL PROTECTION - Thousands of dwellings and beach bars threatened with demolition are being allowed to remain for the time being. Many owners are rejoicing, but there's also been a storm of criticism. A reform to the coastal protection law in Spain gives a 75-year amnesty to some 24,000 buildings that are very close to the coastline. Until now, the law had stipulated that the buildings be demolished, because the land along the shore is considered public property. Many foreigners in particular, whose banks had sold them plots of land as an investment, weren't even aware of the regulation. Now they're relieved. But Spanish environmentalists are ringing alarm bells, saying the reform will bring more development to the coast and a sell-off of the beaches to private investors.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#502H] Bats In Our Midst/Geothermal Power Venture under a Central Valley bridge to count thousands of bats, and uncover Sonoma's geothermal energy. Meet California Academy of Sciences entomologist Brian Fisher at work with ants in Madagascar. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1646] HISPANIC PROTESTANTS - The explosive growth of the number of evangelical Protestants who are Hispanic. Deborah Potter reports on the personal religious experiences of Hispanic evangelicals in Chicago at what is now the largest Assembly of God church in the country.
    COMBATTING EXTREMISM IN BRITAIN - David Tereshchuk examines the mixed results of the British government's efforts to prevent violent religious extremism by some of its own people. Some of the country's Muslim leaders say that can lead to profiling.
    RELIGIOUS REACTION TO THE GEORGE ZIMMERMAN VERDICT - Guest host Deborah Potter and managing editor Kim Lawton are joined by Reverend Romal Tune to discuss the response to the controversial verdict and what faith communities can do now to address issues surrounding race and violence that arose from the case.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1004] First Class Bargains WT explores first class merchandise at bargain prices. That's what "Great Investor" David Winters says he is finding in top companies across the globe. He explains why the opportunities for building wealth in global stock markets have never been better. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#225H] Ric Edelman and his staff investigate the balance between risk and reward hundreds of feet above the ground, take a look at the world of digital media with Variety's Neil Stiles and answers a young man from Florida's questions about the safety of foreign bonds. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2514H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3130] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5303H] * It's been nearly a week since a Florida jury acquitted George Zimmerman for the death of Trayvon Martin. Following the verdict, Attorney General Eric Holder repeated his pledge to continue a federal investigation into the 17-year-old's death. He also sharply criticized Florida's "Stand Your Ground" self-defense law. Pierre Thomas of ABC News will report on the aftermath of the Zimmerman not-guilty verdict.
    * At the White House today, President Obama forged ahead in promoting parts of his signature health care legislation set to go into effect this October. At the same time congressional Republicans continued their push to repeal the law or at least delay or dismantle it. What's going on? David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will explain why the debate over the Affordable Care Act has continued a year after becoming law.
    * Earlier in the week on Capitol Hill, a rare bipartisan compromise in the Senate led to a tentative deal to avoid the so-called "nuclear option" on filibuster rules. The agreement cleared the way for the confirmation of a handful of presidential nominees whose nominations had been languishing. But will the spirit of bipartisanship extend to the coming battles over the budget and debt-ceiling? We'll get answers and analysis from Charles Babington of the Associated Press.
    * Plus, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report will take a closer look at Liz Cheney's bid to unseat fellow Republican and three-term Senator Mike Enzi of Wyoming and the landscape for the 2014 mid-term elections.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2437H] July 19, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    JANET NAPOLITANO - Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano has been confirmed as president of the University of California, making her the first female to head the UC system in its 145-year history. Confirmation proceedings were marked by student protests at the UC Board of Regents meeting in San Francisco. Opponents are voicing concerns over Napolitano's lack of experience in academia and her immigration policies. Supporters defend the unusual pick, citing her ability to manage a complex system and to meet the political demands of the job.
    PG&E PENALTY - Taking a tough stance on PG&E for the 2010 San Bruno pipeline explosion, the Public Utilities Commission has proposed a hefty penalty to go toward pipeline safety improvements and a fine to be paid to the state. The utility company says the fine will limit its ability to pay for improvements to safety.
    RICHMOND RAPE VERDICTS - Guilty verdicts for two of the men accused in the 2009 gang rape of a 16-year old girl outside a Richmond High School dance brings some closure for the brutal crime that drew national attention. How has the school and the community addressed the issue of violence and attempted to move forward?
    Guests: Ana Tintocalis, KQED News; Jaxon Vanderbeken, San Francisco Chronicle; and Aimee Allison, San Francisco Department on the Status of Women.
    EVA PATERSON ON RACIAL PROFILING AND THE TRAYVON MARTIN CASE - The acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin has sparked strong reaction, from Florida to California. The verdict, which coincided with the opening of the feature film "Fruitvale Station" about the killing of Oscar Grant by a BART police officer in 2009, struck a nerve in the Bay Area. It also cast a renewed spotlight on "stand your ground" laws, which allow people to defend themselves with deadly force if they feel threatened. Eva Paterson, president of the Equal Justice Society, discusses the lasting impact of these cases.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#228H] A New Case for Gun Control * The death of Trayvon Martin has ignited debate not just over our justice system, but on legislation such as the "stand your ground" laws that contributed to the tragic result. This week, Bill talks with author and gun control advocate Tom Diaz about how a lethal combination of self-defense laws and concealed carry laws - championed by the NRA and the gun industry - dilutes our legal protections against gun violence. He warns that the genie is out of the bottle and we should be gravely concerned about the unrelenting marketing of guns. Diaz's latest book is The Last Gun: How Changes in the Gun Industry Are Killing Americans and What It Will Take to Stop It.
    * Also on the show, a hard look at the plight of the men and women who bend to the earth in backbreaking labor, picking fruits, vegetables, and tobacco. Despite miracles of agricultural progress and innovation over the decades, the harsh lives and working conditions of migrant laborers have changed very little. Their cause has been championed in the past by Edward Murrow, Cesar Chavez, and the United Farmworkers, but that list is incomplete without Baldemar Velasquez. Velasquez was among hundreds of thousands of children who joined their migrant parents working long hours in the fields. Inspired by that early experience, Velasquez founded the Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC) in 1967. A 1989 MacArthur Fellow, Velasquez joins Bill to talk about the ongoing David vs. Goliath struggles to ensure fairness for American farmworkers.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2514H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3130] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2219H] SENATOR GILLIBRAND'S SEXUAL ASSAULT BILL - Its gain of supporters from both parties. Senator Gillibrand tells Bonnie Erbe why critics have it wrong.
    TRANSGENDER PEOPLE - Transgender people get federal backing to become a protected class - at least for employment rights.
    WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESSES - Why has the US not reached their 5% goal?
    Panelists: Former EEOC Chair Cari Dominguez, Host of Focus Point Avis Jones-DeWeever, Democratic Commentator Megan Beyer, The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#151] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#502H] Bats In Our Midst/Geothermal Power Venture under a Central Valley bridge to count thousands of bats, and uncover Sonoma's geothermal energy. Meet California Academy of Sciences entomologist Brian Fisher at work with ants in Madagascar. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#101H] Iconic interviewer Charlie Rose brings his unique style to the weekends with the best stories and interviews of the past week, featuring the defining moments in - and conversations about - the news, the sciences, the arts and entertainment.
    This week: Charlie takes a look at the Trayvon Martin verdict and America's evolving discussion on race; we revisit our conversation with J.K. Rowling in light of her suprising new novel; and columnist Tom Friedman shares with us his favorite film.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#228H] A New Case for Gun Control * The death of Trayvon Martin has ignited debate not just over our justice system, but on legislation such as the "stand your ground" laws that contributed to the tragic result. This week, Bill talks with author and gun control advocate Tom Diaz about how a lethal combination of self-defense laws and concealed carry laws - championed by the NRA and the gun industry - dilutes our legal protections against gun violence. He warns that the genie is out of the bottle and we should be gravely concerned about the unrelenting marketing of guns. Diaz's latest book is The Last Gun: How Changes in the Gun Industry Are Killing Americans and What It Will Take to Stop It.
    * Also on the show, a hard look at the plight of the men and women who bend to the earth in backbreaking labor, picking fruits, vegetables, and tobacco. Despite miracles of agricultural progress and innovation over the decades, the harsh lives and working conditions of migrant laborers have changed very little. Their cause has been championed in the past by Edward Murrow, Cesar Chavez, and the United Farmworkers, but that list is incomplete without Baldemar Velasquez. Velasquez was among hundreds of thousands of children who joined their migrant parents working long hours in the fields. Inspired by that early experience, Velasquez founded the Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC) in 1967. A 1989 MacArthur Fellow, Velasquez joins Bill to talk about the ongoing David vs. Goliath struggles to ensure fairness for American farmworkers.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5303H] * It's been nearly a week since a Florida jury acquitted George Zimmerman for the death of Trayvon Martin. Following the verdict, Attorney General Eric Holder repeated his pledge to continue a federal investigation into the 17-year-old's death. He also sharply criticized Florida's "Stand Your Ground" self-defense law. Pierre Thomas of ABC News will report on the aftermath of the Zimmerman not-guilty verdict.
    * At the White House today, President Obama forged ahead in promoting parts of his signature health care legislation set to go into effect this October. At the same time congressional Republicans continued their push to repeal the law or at least delay or dismantle it. What's going on? David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will explain why the debate over the Affordable Care Act has continued a year after becoming law.
    * Earlier in the week on Capitol Hill, a rare bipartisan compromise in the Senate led to a tentative deal to avoid the so-called "nuclear option" on filibuster rules. The agreement cleared the way for the confirmation of a handful of presidential nominees whose nominations had been languishing. But will the spirit of bipartisanship extend to the coming battles over the budget and debt-ceiling? We'll get answers and analysis from Charles Babington of the Associated Press.
    * Plus, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report will take a closer look at Liz Cheney's bid to unseat fellow Republican and three-term Senator Mike Enzi of Wyoming and the landscape for the 2014 mid-term elections.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2514H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3130] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2437H] July 19, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    JANET NAPOLITANO - Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano has been confirmed as president of the University of California, making her the first female to head the UC system in its 145-year history. Confirmation proceedings were marked by student protests at the UC Board of Regents meeting in San Francisco. Opponents are voicing concerns over Napolitano's lack of experience in academia and her immigration policies. Supporters defend the unusual pick, citing her ability to manage a complex system and to meet the political demands of the job.
    PG&E PENALTY - Taking a tough stance on PG&E for the 2010 San Bruno pipeline explosion, the Public Utilities Commission has proposed a hefty penalty to go toward pipeline safety improvements and a fine to be paid to the state. The utility company says the fine will limit its ability to pay for improvements to safety.
    RICHMOND RAPE VERDICTS - Guilty verdicts for two of the men accused in the 2009 gang rape of a 16-year old girl outside a Richmond High School dance brings some closure for the brutal crime that drew national attention. How has the school and the community addressed the issue of violence and attempted to move forward?
    Guests: Ana Tintocalis, KQED News; Jaxon Vanderbeken, San Francisco Chronicle; and Aimee Allison, San Francisco Department on the Status of Women.
    EVA PATERSON ON RACIAL PROFILING AND THE TRAYVON MARTIN CASE - The acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin has sparked strong reaction, from Florida to California. The verdict, which coincided with the opening of the feature film "Fruitvale Station" about the killing of Oscar Grant by a BART police officer in 2009, struck a nerve in the Bay Area. It also cast a renewed spotlight on "stand your ground" laws, which allow people to defend themselves with deadly force if they feel threatened. Eva Paterson, president of the Equal Justice Society, discusses the lasting impact of these cases.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#502H] Bats In Our Midst/Geothermal Power Venture under a Central Valley bridge to count thousands of bats, and uncover Sonoma's geothermal energy. Meet California Academy of Sciences entomologist Brian Fisher at work with ants in Madagascar. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#101H] The Facebook Effect Watch Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg along with author David Kirkpatrick in conversation with NPR's Guy Raz. duration 53:11   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#228H] A New Case for Gun Control * The death of Trayvon Martin has ignited debate not just over our justice system, but on legislation such as the "stand your ground" laws that contributed to the tragic result. This week, Bill talks with author and gun control advocate Tom Diaz about how a lethal combination of self-defense laws and concealed carry laws - championed by the NRA and the gun industry - dilutes our legal protections against gun violence. He warns that the genie is out of the bottle and we should be gravely concerned about the unrelenting marketing of guns. Diaz's latest book is The Last Gun: How Changes in the Gun Industry Are Killing Americans and What It Will Take to Stop It.
    * Also on the show, a hard look at the plight of the men and women who bend to the earth in backbreaking labor, picking fruits, vegetables, and tobacco. Despite miracles of agricultural progress and innovation over the decades, the harsh lives and working conditions of migrant laborers have changed very little. Their cause has been championed in the past by Edward Murrow, Cesar Chavez, and the United Farmworkers, but that list is incomplete without Baldemar Velasquez. Velasquez was among hundreds of thousands of children who joined their migrant parents working long hours in the fields. Inspired by that early experience, Velasquez founded the Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC) in 1967. A 1989 MacArthur Fellow, Velasquez joins Bill to talk about the ongoing David vs. Goliath struggles to ensure fairness for American farmworkers.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#117] New Muslim Cool Puerto Rican-American rapper Hamza P?rez pulled himself out of drug dealing and street life 12 years ago and became a Muslim. Now he's moved to Pittsburgh's tough North Side to start a new religious community, rebuild his shattered family and take his message of faith to other young people through hard-hitting hip-hop music. But when the FBI raids his mosque, Hamza must confront the realities of the post-9/11 world, and himself. New Muslim Cool takes viewers on Hamza's ride through streets, slums and jail cells; following his spiritual journey to some surprising places in an America that never stops changing. Produced in association with Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) and the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM). duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Global Voices [#422] A Son's Sacrifice Imran, a young Muslim American, struggles to take over his father's neighborhood halal slaughterhouse in New York City. duration 25:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#608] Behind The Rainbow More than a decade after the inauguration of Nelson Mandela, South Africa was slated to become the host of the World Cup in 2010 - a public affirmation of its break with its violent legacy of apartheid. But while the founding Freedom Charter of the African National Congress (ANC) outlined ideals for "a better life for all," harsh inequalities still existed, from xenophobic attacks to corruption scandals and township protests. As a new decade looms, post-apartheid South Africa is at a crucial and dangerous crossroads.
    With the 2009 presidential election as a backdrop, this documentary gives a previously untold account of the country's political problems, struggles, and realities. It explores the transition of the ANC from a liberation organization into South Africa's ruling party, through the evolution of the relationship between two of its most prominent veterans, Thabo Mbeki and Jacob Zuma.
    Exiled under apartheid, they were once brothers in arms. Under Mandela's administration, they loyally labored to build a non-racial state. Now, they are bitter rivals. Their duel threatens to tear apart the ANC and the country, as the poor desperately seek hope in change and the elite fight for the spoils of victory. The film features key interviews with ANC current and former leaders, including Jacob Zuma, Kgalema Motlanthe, Pallo Jordan, Thabo Mbeki, and Terror Lekota. Examining previous events that the country's political decision-makers have agreed to bury for the sake of democracy, this is a behind-the-scenes look at South Africa's seemingly miraculous transformation.
    duration 1:25:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Lost Years of Zora Neale Hurston Writer, folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston, a celebrated (and sometimes controversial) figure of the Harlem Renaissance, first rose to prominence with Mules and Men (1935) and cemented her reputation soon after with her 1937 masterwork, Their Eyes Were Watching God. However, few know about the woman behind this widely read and highly acclaimed novel - particularly the last 10 years of her life.
    This program delves into the writer's life, work and philosophies, concentrating on her very productive but often overlooked, final decade. Interviews with Hurston experts and colleagues, letters from Hurston, and archival photographs piece together this fascinating chapter in the life of an American literary icon.
    duration 26:48   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, July 21, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too