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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, July 14, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, July 14, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#109] Meat Hooked This film is part the history of butchering, but mostly an entertaining look at the current phenomenon of environmentally conscience twenty and thirtysomethings bringing butchering back as a kind of new green collar job. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Tomlinson Hill In the mid-1800s just outside of Marlin, Texas, a slave plantation named Tomlinson Hill was founded by James K. Tomlinson. The establishment would have long lasting effects on the rural community. TOMLINSON HILL documents how the legacy of slavery in east and central Texas has created a region still divided despite the civil rights changes of the last 60 years. Reporter Chris Tomlinson, a descendant of slave owner James K. Tomlinson, confronts the shame and guilt he feels from his ancestry and digs deeper into the real legacy of the area. He comes across Loreane Tomlinson, a descendant of slaves on Tomlinson Hill, who has returned to her hometown with a vision of civic improvement. Says Tomlinson "After meeting Loreane, I knew I wanted the film to tell the story of my family history as well as her family history. Together, it's the story of America, as far as I'm concerned/" The documentary is a fascinating look at people trying to move on while others idly resist change. Can Marlin survive and transform not only the racial separation that exists, but the deep-rooted socio-economic divide as well? duration 56:33   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#219] Reading Like A Historian Perseverance and Problem Solving: We'll visit several classrooms where the most important thing students are learning is the value of making mistakes. You'll witness the sense of accomplishment that comes with problem solving, trying again, and making progress. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#227H] Distracted from Democracy * Across the world - Greece, Spain, Brazil, Egypt - citizens are turning angrily to their governments to demand economic fair play and equality. But here in America, with few exceptions, the streets and airwaves remain relatively silent. In a country as rich and powerful as America, why is there so little outcry about the ever-increasing, deliberate divide between the very wealthy and everyone else?
    This week, media scholar Marty Kaplan points to a number of forces keeping these issues and affected citizens in the dark - especially our well-fed appetite for media distraction. An award-winning columnist and head of the Norman Lear Center at the University of Southern California, Kaplan also talks about the appropriate role of journalists as advocates for truth.
    * Later on the show, acclaimed historian Gary May puts the recent Supreme Court decision gutting the Voting Rights Act into historical perspective, noting it's just one moment in a long, ongoing struggle to ensure voting rights for every American. A specialist in American political, diplomatic and social history, May's latest book is Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5302H] * The Senate-passed comprehensive immigration reform bill is facing significant hurdles in the House. Republican leaders want a smaller "bite-sized" approach according to House Speaker John Boehner. The biggest sticking point is over a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Alan Gomez of USA Today will report on the competing priorities to reform including border security and will also explain President Obama's role in promoting immigration overhaul.
    * One week after military forces toppled Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, the US finds itself walking a diplomatic tightrope. Peter Baker of The New York Times will explain the political bind the administration finds itself in following Morsi's removal and the debate over continued US financial and military aid to Egypt.
    * Across the country a number of states are considering more restrictive abortion laws as evidenced by two special legislative sessions in Texas in the past month. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will examine why reproductive rights continue to be a hot-button issue four decades after Roe vs. Wade.
    * Plus, Beth Reinhard of National Journal will take a closer look at how voters' opinions may be shifting when it comes to political candidates' sex scandals and redemption.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3129] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#328H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2513H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#109] Meat Hooked This film is part the history of butchering, but mostly an entertaining look at the current phenomenon of environmentally conscience twenty and thirtysomethings bringing butchering back as a kind of new green collar job. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3127] Yankee Go Home - Chants Heard In Italy A European Journal special edition on Croatia. With its islands and beautiful beaches, Croatia is one of Europe's most popular tourist destinations. Croatia will join the European Union on July 1, 2013. The majority of Croats think EU membership is long overdue and that Croatia under the umbrella of the EU will ensure freedom. The details:
    CROATIA: THE SMALLEST CITY IN THE WORLD - The smallest city in the world, Hum in Istria in northwest Croatia, is about to become a part of the European Union. The medieval town overlooking the Mima Valley is a popular tourist destination. The people of Hum hope that EU membership will generate more income from tourism. Hum only has about 25 permanent residents. They pride themselves on their openness and hospitality. But they do have some concerns about joining the EU and giving up some of their recently gained sovereignty.
    CROATIA: TRACES OF THE PAST - Since the founding of the EU, Croatia will become the first member to have experienced protracted war on its own soil in recent history. In the east of the country, in Vukovar, the damage is still visible. And reconciliation between the divided ethnic groups is still a long way off. The Croatian government has recently made small concessions to Serbs in the country. Road signs in communities with a high percentage of Serbs will be in Cyrillic along with Latin letters. Civilian groups in Croatia have consistently pushed for the extradition of war criminals. But Vukovar seems to remain an open wound. And for the most part, Serbs and Croats there avoid each other.
    CROATIA: WELCOME TO THE CLUB - Croatia will become the 28th member of the EU. And in these times of the Euro crisis, Croatia's delegates heading for the European Parliament in Brussels will be joining a quarrelsome group. Britain has been thinking out loud about leaving the EU. German-French relations are cooler than ever. And German Chancellor Angela Merkel has irked her southern European partners with her austerity measures. Croatia has selected 12 delegates to the European Parliament, five of them from the governing Social Democrats. They will serve for only a year as all EU citizens elect a new parliament in 2014.
    BOSNIA: SITTING ON PACKED SUITCASES - The boundaries of the European Union move outward again with the accession of Croatia. 1,000 kilometers of EU boundary will now run between Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina - and many Bosnian Croats who now hold Croatian passports will automatically be given EU citizenship. Croatia aids its ethnic countrymen in Bosnia to the tune of 10 million euros a year. Many Bosnian Croats have a Croatian passport and are already availing themselves of educational or employment opportunities in Croatia. Many hope they will now be able to move more freely to other EU countries. But that may lead to even more people, even whole villages, emigrating from Bosnia-Herzegovina.
    ITALY: A NEW MELTING POT - The neighboring country of Italy is eagerly awaiting Croatian membership in the EU. Many people in northeastern Italy have Croatian roots. If the customs borders fall, the region will be better integrated with regions that in former times belonged to Venice. There are many Italians of Croatian descent In the area around Trieste whose families were driven out of Croatia after World War Two. The question of compensation for confiscated Italian property has never been resolved; and now many Italians hope to be able to settle in or open up shop in Croatia.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#501H] Track Elephant Seals/Life On Mars Meet scientists tracking elephant seals along San Mateo County's' coast and search for life on Mars with NASA's new rover. Your Videos on QUEST highlights an excerpt of Bay Area filmmaker Joshua Cassidy's short film, Life by the Tide. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1645] BLOODLESS SURGERY - For Jehovah's Witnesses receiving blood transfusions is a sin. Betty Rollin reports on a bloodless surgery program at Englewood Hospital in New Jersey which serves not only Jehovah's Witnesses but nearly all of their patients. Neurosurgeon Dr. Abe Steinberger says "The risks of giving blood in many cases outweigh the benefits of giving blood."
    GIBRAN'S LEGACY - This time of year, at many wedding ceremonies, participants read excerpts from Kahlil Gibran's "The Prophet." That little book, first published in 1920, has sold 9 million copies in the US and more than 100 million worldwide. That makes Gibran the third best-selling poet of all time behind Shakespeare and Lao Tzu, the founder of Taoism. But, as Lucky Severson reports, despite Gibran's lasting popularity, he remains controversial among critics.
    EGYPT'S TURMOIL - Host Bob Abernethy talks with Kate Seelye, senior vice president of the Middle East Institute, about the conflict in Egypt and the extent to which it is a struggle between that country's secularists and Islam.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1003] New Investment Era This week: WTexplores a new investment era. If 30-plus years of falling interest rates are coming to an end, what are the new rules of investing? Loomis Sayles' legendary bond manager Dan Fuss and top-ranked strategist turned portfolio manager Richard Bernstein provide their contrarian answers. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#224H] Ric sits down with Homer Hickam, a real rocket scientist who has a new book about the economics of mining on the moon. Plus, down-to-earth advice on owning a racehorse, banking cash reserves and doing your own estate planning. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2513H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3129] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5302H] * The Senate-passed comprehensive immigration reform bill is facing significant hurdles in the House. Republican leaders want a smaller "bite-sized" approach according to House Speaker John Boehner. The biggest sticking point is over a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Alan Gomez of USA Today will report on the competing priorities to reform including border security and will also explain President Obama's role in promoting immigration overhaul.
    * One week after military forces toppled Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, the US finds itself walking a diplomatic tightrope. Peter Baker of The New York Times will explain the political bind the administration finds itself in following Morsi's removal and the debate over continued US financial and military aid to Egypt.
    * Across the country a number of states are considering more restrictive abortion laws as evidenced by two special legislative sessions in Texas in the past month. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will examine why reproductive rights continue to be a hot-button issue four decades after Roe vs. Wade.
    * Plus, Beth Reinhard of National Journal will take a closer look at how voters' opinions may be shifting when it comes to political candidates' sex scandals and redemption.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2436H] July 12, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    BAY BRIDGE OPENING IN QUESTION - Two days after transportation officials announced that the Bay Bridge opening would be delayed until December, an independent review panel proposed a surprise interim fix that would allow the span to open on Labor Day or sooner. The plan calls for installing steel plates - shims - in gaps between bearings to prevent them from swiveling.
    ASIANA CRASH UPDATE - new revelations about the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash at San Francisco International Airport.
    PRISONER HUNGER STRIKE - Gov. Brown has gone to the US Supreme Court to fight a lower court's order requiring the release of nearly 10,000 prisoners to ease overcrowding in California prisons. Meanwhile, thousands of inmates continue to refuse meals in the largest prison hunger strike in state history. Protestors are targeting prison conditions, especially for inmates held in long-term isolation in "Security Housing Units" around the state. Prior hunger strikes prompted some policy changes but many prisoners claim they haven't gone far enough.
    CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO BATTLE - Rising concerns about the possible closure next year of City College of San Francisco erupted in a protest this week by supporters of the embattled school. The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges earlier this month said the college did not meet enough of the fourteen recommendations to maintain its accreditation. Without that license to operate, the college - one of the largest in the country - could receive no public funds and would have to close. This week state officials stripped the elected Board of Trustees of its authority and appointed a "special trustee" with unilateral powers.
    HOUSING CONTROVERSY IN MARIN - After growing resistance by some Marin County residents to a regional plan for dense housing and transportation development in city cores, the board of supervisors withdrew two communities from so-called "Priority Development Areas." The long range development blueprint called Plan Bay Area includes affordable housing. Opposition by Marin residents has grown increasingly heated as some fear they'll succumb to "cookie-cutter" development patterns and lose local control.
    Guests: Tom Vacar, KTVU News; Michael Montgomery, KQED News and Center for Investigative Reporting; Nanette Asimov, San Francisco Chronicle; Richard Halstead, Marin Independent Journal.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#227H] Distracted from Democracy * Across the world - Greece, Spain, Brazil, Egypt - citizens are turning angrily to their governments to demand economic fair play and equality. But here in America, with few exceptions, the streets and airwaves remain relatively silent. In a country as rich and powerful as America, why is there so little outcry about the ever-increasing, deliberate divide between the very wealthy and everyone else?
    This week, media scholar Marty Kaplan points to a number of forces keeping these issues and affected citizens in the dark - especially our well-fed appetite for media distraction. An award-winning columnist and head of the Norman Lear Center at the University of Southern California, Kaplan also talks about the appropriate role of journalists as advocates for truth.
    * Later on the show, acclaimed historian Gary May puts the recent Supreme Court decision gutting the Voting Rights Act into historical perspective, noting it's just one moment in a long, ongoing struggle to ensure voting rights for every American. A specialist in American political, diplomatic and social history, May's latest book is Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2513H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3129] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2218H] CATHOLIC ORGANIZATIONS CLAIM DENIAL OF FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS - The Catholic Health Association's decision to okay Obamacare's free birth control compromise for religiously affiliated non-profits.
    WOMEN INMATES STERILIZED - California prisons and the sterilizations of nearly 250 women inmates in the late 1990's.
    HOME GROWN HUMAN TRAFFICKING - Human trafficking, and how the US is battling the issue in our nation. We spoke with Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano and a champion in the fight Marilyn Carlson Nelson of Carlson Companies.
    Panelists: Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa, Executive Director Independent Women's Forum Sabrina Schaeffer, Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily, Megan Beyer of the Gender Equality Project.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#150] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#501H] Track Elephant Seals/Life On Mars Meet scientists tracking elephant seals along San Mateo County's' coast and search for life on Mars with NASA's new rover. Your Videos on QUEST highlights an excerpt of Bay Area filmmaker Joshua Cassidy's short film, Life by the Tide. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#328H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#227H] Distracted from Democracy * Across the world - Greece, Spain, Brazil, Egypt - citizens are turning angrily to their governments to demand economic fair play and equality. But here in America, with few exceptions, the streets and airwaves remain relatively silent. In a country as rich and powerful as America, why is there so little outcry about the ever-increasing, deliberate divide between the very wealthy and everyone else?
    This week, media scholar Marty Kaplan points to a number of forces keeping these issues and affected citizens in the dark - especially our well-fed appetite for media distraction. An award-winning columnist and head of the Norman Lear Center at the University of Southern California, Kaplan also talks about the appropriate role of journalists as advocates for truth.
    * Later on the show, acclaimed historian Gary May puts the recent Supreme Court decision gutting the Voting Rights Act into historical perspective, noting it's just one moment in a long, ongoing struggle to ensure voting rights for every American. A specialist in American political, diplomatic and social history, May's latest book is Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5302H] * The Senate-passed comprehensive immigration reform bill is facing significant hurdles in the House. Republican leaders want a smaller "bite-sized" approach according to House Speaker John Boehner. The biggest sticking point is over a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Alan Gomez of USA Today will report on the competing priorities to reform including border security and will also explain President Obama's role in promoting immigration overhaul.
    * One week after military forces toppled Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, the US finds itself walking a diplomatic tightrope. Peter Baker of The New York Times will explain the political bind the administration finds itself in following Morsi's removal and the debate over continued US financial and military aid to Egypt.
    * Across the country a number of states are considering more restrictive abortion laws as evidenced by two special legislative sessions in Texas in the past month. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will examine why reproductive rights continue to be a hot-button issue four decades after Roe vs. Wade.
    * Plus, Beth Reinhard of National Journal will take a closer look at how voters' opinions may be shifting when it comes to political candidates' sex scandals and redemption.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2513H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3129] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2436H] July 12, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    BAY BRIDGE OPENING IN QUESTION - Two days after transportation officials announced that the Bay Bridge opening would be delayed until December, an independent review panel proposed a surprise interim fix that would allow the span to open on Labor Day or sooner. The plan calls for installing steel plates - shims - in gaps between bearings to prevent them from swiveling.
    ASIANA CRASH UPDATE - new revelations about the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash at San Francisco International Airport.
    PRISONER HUNGER STRIKE - Gov. Brown has gone to the US Supreme Court to fight a lower court's order requiring the release of nearly 10,000 prisoners to ease overcrowding in California prisons. Meanwhile, thousands of inmates continue to refuse meals in the largest prison hunger strike in state history. Protestors are targeting prison conditions, especially for inmates held in long-term isolation in "Security Housing Units" around the state. Prior hunger strikes prompted some policy changes but many prisoners claim they haven't gone far enough.
    CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO BATTLE - Rising concerns about the possible closure next year of City College of San Francisco erupted in a protest this week by supporters of the embattled school. The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges earlier this month said the college did not meet enough of the fourteen recommendations to maintain its accreditation. Without that license to operate, the college - one of the largest in the country - could receive no public funds and would have to close. This week state officials stripped the elected Board of Trustees of its authority and appointed a "special trustee" with unilateral powers.
    HOUSING CONTROVERSY IN MARIN - After growing resistance by some Marin County residents to a regional plan for dense housing and transportation development in city cores, the board of supervisors withdrew two communities from so-called "Priority Development Areas." The long range development blueprint called Plan Bay Area includes affordable housing. Opposition by Marin residents has grown increasingly heated as some fear they'll succumb to "cookie-cutter" development patterns and lose local control.
    Guests: Tom Vacar, KTVU News; Michael Montgomery, KQED News and Center for Investigative Reporting; Nanette Asimov, San Francisco Chronicle; Richard Halstead, Marin Independent Journal.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#501H] Track Elephant Seals/Life On Mars Meet scientists tracking elephant seals along San Mateo County's' coast and search for life on Mars with NASA's new rover. Your Videos on QUEST highlights an excerpt of Bay Area filmmaker Joshua Cassidy's short film, Life by the Tide. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#105H] The Technology of Animation Jeffrey Katzenberg, CEO, and Ed Leonard, CTO, of Dreamworks Animation in conversation with Vice President and Chief Technology Officer
    for HP's Personal Systems Group, Philip Mc Kinney.
    duration 53:11   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#227H] Distracted from Democracy * Across the world - Greece, Spain, Brazil, Egypt - citizens are turning angrily to their governments to demand economic fair play and equality. But here in America, with few exceptions, the streets and airwaves remain relatively silent. In a country as rich and powerful as America, why is there so little outcry about the ever-increasing, deliberate divide between the very wealthy and everyone else?
    This week, media scholar Marty Kaplan points to a number of forces keeping these issues and affected citizens in the dark - especially our well-fed appetite for media distraction. An award-winning columnist and head of the Norman Lear Center at the University of Southern California, Kaplan also talks about the appropriate role of journalists as advocates for truth.
    * Later on the show, acclaimed historian Gary May puts the recent Supreme Court decision gutting the Voting Rights Act into historical perspective, noting it's just one moment in a long, ongoing struggle to ensure voting rights for every American. A specialist in American political, diplomatic and social history, May's latest book is Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#119] After Happily Ever After Emmy winning filmmaker Kate Schermerhorn's quirky, funny and movingpersonal quest for the secret to a happy marriage and for answers to some timely questions about an institution which might just be due for some review. This engaging doc features an eclectic mix of long married couples - from a couple who dress alike every day; to a pair of nudists and a newlywed pair of mothers, to a feisty English widow. A lively and world-renowned group of marriage experts - including psychologist John Gottman (who can predict divorce with 90% accuracy), marrriage historian Stephanie Coontz, and a Beverly Hills divorce attorney, ground the film in fact as they piece together the history and possible future and motivations for marriage. Along the way, Schermerhorn chronicles the joys and heartbreaks of her own marriage and finds that even the best advice can?t always guarantee a happily ever after. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Question One "Question One" is a probing and insightful look at one of the most bitterly divisive and issues facing our nation today - same sex marriage. Award winning journalists, Joe Fox and James Nubile got unprecedented access to cover both sides of Maine's historic 2009 marriage referendum election. The result is a searing documentary that brings us up close and personal to one election, that tore a state apart and was instrumental in shaping the national landscape of this fast evolving civil rights issue. In war room style fashion, "Question One" has done what no other film has; chronicles the behind-the scenes workings of the pro and anti same-sex marriage campaigns as they fought for the hearts, minds and votes of the people of Maine. For three months, the filmmakers imbedded themselves in war rooms and strategy sessions as they captured the private thoughts, fears and conflicts expressed by key leaders as well as followed the foot soldiers and volunteers as they knocked on countless doors and made endless phone calls in an attempt to persuade and plead their neighbors and strangers to vote yes or no on "Question One". duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#607] Invoking Justice Muslim women from a small town in South India deliver justice in their own courts, posing a radical challenge to their traditional Muslim community and clergy. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#119] Greener Grass: Cuba, Baseball and the United States Since 1866, Cubans have lovingly played baseball, a game that represented independence and modernity. Both Cuba and the U.S. embraced the game, but in distinct ways. Set against the backdrop of the choppy history of U.S.-Cuban relations, this program documents how both countries have used baseball as a political tool and how the sport has operated as both bridge and barrier between the two lands. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
Sunday, July 14, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

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KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

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Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

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V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

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