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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, July 13, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, July 13, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10710] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32158Z] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, UPS, the world's biggest package delivery company, issues a warning to investors that its earnings won't be as strong as originally thought. What does this bellwether say about the health of the economy? And, more baby boomers are taking up options trading. But do the risks outweigh the rewards? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2944] Tavis talks with journalist Michael D'Antonio, author of Mortal Sins: Sex, Crime, and the Era of Catholic Scandal. The Pulitzer Prize winner unpacks his new text on the sexual abuse cover-ups by the Catholic Church. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Lost Bird Project This captivating nature documentary charts sculptor Todd McGrain's efforts to memorialize five birds - the Great Auk, Carolina Parakeet, Labrador Duck, Passenger Pigeon and Heath Hen - driven to extinction in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It follows McGrain and his brother-in-law Andy as they embark on a road trip in search of the last-known locations of the birds and seek permission to install McGrain's six-foot-tall bronze sculptures on those sites. Travelling from the tropical swamps of Florida to the rocky coasts of Newfoundland to the shores of Martha's Vineyard, the men spend more than two years scouting locations, talking to park rangers, speaking at town meetings and battling bureaucracy in their effort to gather support for the project. An elegy to the five birds, the program is a thoughtful and sometimes humorous look at the artist and his mission. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1645] BLOODLESS SURGERY - For Jehovah's Witnesses receiving blood transfusions is a sin. Betty Rollin reports on a bloodless surgery program at Englewood Hospital in New Jersey which serves not only Jehovah's Witnesses but nearly all of their patients. Neurosurgeon Dr. Abe Steinberger says "The risks of giving blood in many cases outweigh the benefits of giving blood."
    GIBRAN'S LEGACY - This time of year, at many wedding ceremonies, participants read excerpts from Kahlil Gibran's "The Prophet." That little book, first published in 1920, has sold 9 million copies in the US and more than 100 million worldwide. That makes Gibran the third best-selling poet of all time behind Shakespeare and Lao Tzu, the founder of Taoism. But, as Lucky Severson reports, despite Gibran's lasting popularity, he remains controversial among critics.
    EGYPT'S TURMOIL - Host Bob Abernethy talks with Kate Seelye, senior vice president of the Middle East Institute, about the conflict in Egypt and the extent to which it is a struggle between that country's secularists and Islam.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1003] New Investment Era This week: WTexplores a new investment era. If 30-plus years of falling interest rates are coming to an end, what are the new rules of investing? Loomis Sayles' legendary bond manager Dan Fuss and top-ranked strategist turned portfolio manager Richard Bernstein provide their contrarian answers. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2218H] CATHOLIC ORGANIZATIONS CLAIM DENIAL OF FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS - The Catholic Health Association's decision to okay Obamacare's free birth control compromise for religiously affiliated non-profits.
    WOMEN INMATES STERILIZED - California prisons and the sterilizations of nearly 250 women inmates in the late 1990's.
    HOME GROWN HUMAN TRAFFICKING - Human trafficking, and how the US is battling the issue in our nation. We spoke with Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano and a champion in the fight Marilyn Carlson Nelson of Carlson Companies.
    Panelists: Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa, Executive Director Independent Women's Forum Sabrina Schaeffer, Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily, Megan Beyer of the Gender Equality Project.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#206] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Lewis & Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery [#101] Part 1 of 2 In 1801, the United States ended at the Mississippi River and almost all Americans lived 50 miles west of the Atlantic Ocean. When President Thomas Jefferson bought the Louisiana Territory from Napoleon, he doubled the country's size. The sudden western expansion of the United States--and rumors of a Northwest Passage that would link the Atlantic with the Pacific--motivated Jefferson to find the great byway to the West. Previously, it had been shrouded in mystery-- Jefferson's books described a world that contained erupting volcanoes, hills of pure salt and blue-eyed Indians who spoke Welsh. He appropriated $2,500 for the journey and commissioned his secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to the task of revealing the West. Lewis asked his old friend, William Clark, and a group of rough frontiersmen to join the expedition, now called the Corps of Discovery. This Ken Burns documentary chronicles the challenges, frustrations and anxiety that faced the Corps of Discovery -- their encounters with Native Americans, the new animals and plant life they discovered, their historic pairing with Sacagawea, and their crossing of the Continental Divide. duration 1:51:49   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#227H] Distracted from Democracy * Across the world - Greece, Spain, Brazil, Egypt - citizens are turning angrily to their governments to demand economic fair play and equality. But here in America, with few exceptions, the streets and airwaves remain relatively silent. In a country as rich and powerful as America, why is there so little outcry about the ever-increasing, deliberate divide between the very wealthy and everyone else?
    This week, media scholar Marty Kaplan points to a number of forces keeping these issues and affected citizens in the dark - especially our well-fed appetite for media distraction. An award-winning columnist and head of the Norman Lear Center at the University of Southern California, Kaplan also talks about the appropriate role of journalists as advocates for truth.
    * Later on the show, acclaimed historian Gary May puts the recent Supreme Court decision gutting the Voting Rights Act into historical perspective, noting it's just one moment in a long, ongoing struggle to ensure voting rights for every American. A specialist in American political, diplomatic and social history, May's latest book is Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#150] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2513H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5302H] * The Senate-passed comprehensive immigration reform bill is facing significant hurdles in the House. Republican leaders want a smaller "bite-sized" approach according to House Speaker John Boehner. The biggest sticking point is over a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Alan Gomez of USA Today will report on the competing priorities to reform including border security and will also explain President Obama's role in promoting immigration overhaul.
    * One week after military forces toppled Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, the US finds itself walking a diplomatic tightrope. Peter Baker of The New York Times will explain the political bind the administration finds itself in following Morsi's removal and the debate over continued US financial and military aid to Egypt.
    * Across the country a number of states are considering more restrictive abortion laws as evidenced by two special legislative sessions in Texas in the past month. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will examine why reproductive rights continue to be a hot-button issue four decades after Roe vs. Wade.
    * Plus, Beth Reinhard of National Journal will take a closer look at how voters' opinions may be shifting when it comes to political candidates' sex scandals and redemption.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2436H] July 12, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    BAY BRIDGE OPENING IN QUESTION - Two days after transportation officials announced that the Bay Bridge opening would be delayed until December, an independent review panel proposed a surprise interim fix that would allow the span to open on Labor Day or sooner. The plan calls for installing steel plates - shims - in gaps between bearings to prevent them from swiveling.
    ASIANA CRASH UPDATE - new revelations about the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash at San Francisco International Airport.
    PRISONER HUNGER STRIKE - Gov. Brown has gone to the US Supreme Court to fight a lower court's order requiring the release of nearly 10,000 prisoners to ease overcrowding in California prisons. Meanwhile, thousands of inmates continue to refuse meals in the largest prison hunger strike in state history. Protestors are targeting prison conditions, especially for inmates held in long-term isolation in "Security Housing Units" around the state. Prior hunger strikes prompted some policy changes but many prisoners claim they haven't gone far enough.
    CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO BATTLE - Rising concerns about the possible closure next year of City College of San Francisco erupted in a protest this week by supporters of the embattled school. The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges earlier this month said the college did not meet enough of the fourteen recommendations to maintain its accreditation. Without that license to operate, the college - one of the largest in the country - could receive no public funds and would have to close. This week state officials stripped the elected Board of Trustees of its authority and appointed a "special trustee" with unilateral powers.
    HOUSING CONTROVERSY IN MARIN - After growing resistance by some Marin County residents to a regional plan for dense housing and transportation development in city cores, the board of supervisors withdrew two communities from so-called "Priority Development Areas." The long range development blueprint called Plan Bay Area includes affordable housing. Opposition by Marin residents has grown increasingly heated as some fear they'll succumb to "cookie-cutter" development patterns and lose local control.
    Guests: Tom Vacar, KTVU News; Michael Montgomery, KQED News and Center for Investigative Reporting; Nanette Asimov, San Francisco Chronicle; Richard Halstead, Marin Independent Journal.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17193Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2218H] CATHOLIC ORGANIZATIONS CLAIM DENIAL OF FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS - The Catholic Health Association's decision to okay Obamacare's free birth control compromise for religiously affiliated non-profits.
    WOMEN INMATES STERILIZED - California prisons and the sterilizations of nearly 250 women inmates in the late 1990's.
    HOME GROWN HUMAN TRAFFICKING - Human trafficking, and how the US is battling the issue in our nation. We spoke with Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano and a champion in the fight Marilyn Carlson Nelson of Carlson Companies.
    Panelists: Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa, Executive Director Independent Women's Forum Sabrina Schaeffer, Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily, Megan Beyer of the Gender Equality Project.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3129] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#328H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#227H] Distracted from Democracy * Across the world - Greece, Spain, Brazil, Egypt - citizens are turning angrily to their governments to demand economic fair play and equality. But here in America, with few exceptions, the streets and airwaves remain relatively silent. In a country as rich and powerful as America, why is there so little outcry about the ever-increasing, deliberate divide between the very wealthy and everyone else?
    This week, media scholar Marty Kaplan points to a number of forces keeping these issues and affected citizens in the dark - especially our well-fed appetite for media distraction. An award-winning columnist and head of the Norman Lear Center at the University of Southern California, Kaplan also talks about the appropriate role of journalists as advocates for truth.
    * Later on the show, acclaimed historian Gary May puts the recent Supreme Court decision gutting the Voting Rights Act into historical perspective, noting it's just one moment in a long, ongoing struggle to ensure voting rights for every American. A specialist in American political, diplomatic and social history, May's latest book is Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#501H] Track Elephant Seals/Life On Mars Meet scientists tracking elephant seals along San Mateo County's' coast and search for life on Mars with NASA's new rover. Your Videos on QUEST highlights an excerpt of Bay Area filmmaker Joshua Cassidy's short film, Life by the Tide. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#229] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Custer's Last Stand: American Experience On June 26, 1876, near the Little Bighorn River in Montana Territory, General George Armstrong Custer ordered his soldiers to drive back a large army of Lakota and Cheyenne warriors. The battle pitted two larger-than-life antagonists against one another: Sitting Bull, the charismatic and politically savvy leader of the Plains Indians, and George Armstrong Custer, one of the Union's greatest cavalry officers and a man with a reputation for often reckless courage. By days end, Custer and nearly a third of his army were dead. This biography of one of the most charismatic and contradictory American leaders of the 19th century takes viewers on a journey from Custer's memorable, wild charge at Gettysburg that turned the tide of that battle, to his lonely, untimely death on the windswept plains of the West. Along the way, viewers learn how, time and time again, the supremely ambitious son of a blacksmith ricocheted from triumph to disaster, from battlefield heroism to impetuous escapade. In the end, Custer's reputation was saved by the wife he adored, who almost single-handedly turned the Battle of the Little Bighorn into one of the most iconic events in American history and mythologized Custer's role. duration 1:55:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Intelligence Squared [#105H] Should Genetically Engineered Babies Be Prohibited? Imagine a world free of genetic diseases, where parents control their offspring's height, eye color and intelligence. The science may be closer than you think. Genes interact in ways that we don't fully understand and there could be unintended consequences, new diseases that result from our tinkering. But even if the science could be perfected, is it morally wrong? Would it lead to eugenics and a stratified society where only the rich enjoy the benefits of genetic enhancement? Or would the real injustice be depriving our children of every scientifically possible opportunity? duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Thousand Invisible Cords: Connecting Genes to Ecosystems Can an entire landscape be changed by changing one gene in one plant or animal? Thirty years of interdisciplinary research says yes, and this film follows the scientific journey that came to that conclusion. "A Thousand Invisible Cords: Connecting Genes to Ecosystems" is an eco-documentary that can truly change how we view the world. No longer will we see species as isolated members of ecosystems but as genetically connected members of a rich interacting community. In the words of the 19th century naturalist, writer, and environmental activist John Muir: "When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find that it is bound fast by a thousand invisible cords that cannot be broken to everything in the universe." At the heart of the research is the beautiful and magestic cottonwood tree, which grows along the banks of North American waterways. The lush cottonwoods are central to the health and biodiversity of their ecosystem. Researchers have found that a small change in just a few lines of genetic code in this "foundation species" can have profound effects on whole communities and even entire ecosystems. These findings have inspired scientific collaboration as never before. Researchers as well as the plants and animals they study are artfully shown in the lab and in the field. Beautiful photographey and colorful motion graphics give depth to the viewers' understanding of the ground breaking new scienc, Molecular geneticists, ecologists, and restoration biologists are shown working together toward solving important environmental problems facing our world, such as: ? How to manage climate change ? How to restore damaged ecosystems ? How to preserve biodiversity and ? How to gauge the effects of new technologies on the environment. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3129] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5302H] * The Senate-passed comprehensive immigration reform bill is facing significant hurdles in the House. Republican leaders want a smaller "bite-sized" approach according to House Speaker John Boehner. The biggest sticking point is over a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Alan Gomez of USA Today will report on the competing priorities to reform including border security and will also explain President Obama's role in promoting immigration overhaul.
    * One week after military forces toppled Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, the US finds itself walking a diplomatic tightrope. Peter Baker of The New York Times will explain the political bind the administration finds itself in following Morsi's removal and the debate over continued US financial and military aid to Egypt.
    * Across the country a number of states are considering more restrictive abortion laws as evidenced by two special legislative sessions in Texas in the past month. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will examine why reproductive rights continue to be a hot-button issue four decades after Roe vs. Wade.
    * Plus, Beth Reinhard of National Journal will take a closer look at how voters' opinions may be shifting when it comes to political candidates' sex scandals and redemption.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2436H] July 12, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    BAY BRIDGE OPENING IN QUESTION - Two days after transportation officials announced that the Bay Bridge opening would be delayed until December, an independent review panel proposed a surprise interim fix that would allow the span to open on Labor Day or sooner. The plan calls for installing steel plates - shims - in gaps between bearings to prevent them from swiveling.
    ASIANA CRASH UPDATE - new revelations about the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash at San Francisco International Airport.
    PRISONER HUNGER STRIKE - Gov. Brown has gone to the US Supreme Court to fight a lower court's order requiring the release of nearly 10,000 prisoners to ease overcrowding in California prisons. Meanwhile, thousands of inmates continue to refuse meals in the largest prison hunger strike in state history. Protestors are targeting prison conditions, especially for inmates held in long-term isolation in "Security Housing Units" around the state. Prior hunger strikes prompted some policy changes but many prisoners claim they haven't gone far enough.
    CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO BATTLE - Rising concerns about the possible closure next year of City College of San Francisco erupted in a protest this week by supporters of the embattled school. The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges earlier this month said the college did not meet enough of the fourteen recommendations to maintain its accreditation. Without that license to operate, the college - one of the largest in the country - could receive no public funds and would have to close. This week state officials stripped the elected Board of Trustees of its authority and appointed a "special trustee" with unilateral powers.
    HOUSING CONTROVERSY IN MARIN - After growing resistance by some Marin County residents to a regional plan for dense housing and transportation development in city cores, the board of supervisors withdrew two communities from so-called "Priority Development Areas." The long range development blueprint called Plan Bay Area includes affordable housing. Opposition by Marin residents has grown increasingly heated as some fear they'll succumb to "cookie-cutter" development patterns and lose local control.
    Guests: Tom Vacar, KTVU News; Michael Montgomery, KQED News and Center for Investigative Reporting; Nanette Asimov, San Francisco Chronicle; Richard Halstead, Marin Independent Journal.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#501H] Track Elephant Seals/Life On Mars Meet scientists tracking elephant seals along San Mateo County's' coast and search for life on Mars with NASA's new rover. Your Videos on QUEST highlights an excerpt of Bay Area filmmaker Joshua Cassidy's short film, Life by the Tide. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1214] Mid-Atlantic States Brianna begins her travels in New Jersey with a visit to Atlantic City and Wildwoods on a 1950s themed weekend. Next it's on to Delaware, with stops in Lewes and Annapolis, followed by crabbing on the Chesapeake Bay. Brianna journeys through the Brandywine Valley, which stretches through Delaware and Pennsylvania, on her way to Philadelphia for a taste of the famous cheesesteaks and a look at the Art Museum. She continues west through Amish country, takes in the new Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville and checks out the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. Brianna makes her way to Virginia, where she encounters a replica of Stonehenge made entirely from Styrofoam and concludes her trip at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson. duration 55:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2102] Kalahari: The Great Thirstland For years, the Kalahari Desert can appear to be one of the most barren wastelands on earth. But its swirling hot sands hold unseen treasure - a swarming superabundance of life, brought forth by a brief season of sudden, unpredictable storms. Butterflies, termites and locusts burst forth in staggering numbers. Millions of quelea birds swirl in the sky like smoke. Most impressive is the giant bullfrog - the size of a dinner plate with a voice to match, this amphibian waits out the dry years entombed deep underground. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1205] Ultimate Tut Ninety years ago in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, the greatest archaeological find in history was made: the discovery of Tutankhamen's tomb and its golden treasures. It made Tutankhamen the most famous name in ancient Egyptian history. But the real story has become shrouded in myth -- with many mysteries around the tomb unsolved to this day. This two-hour special combines the latest evidence from a team of archaeologists, anatomists, geologists and Egyptologists to build the ultimate picture of Tutankhamen. Blending 3D graphics, stylized reconstruction and action-adventure forensic investigation, the programs take a 21st-century approach to ancient history, following new scientific research and presenting fresh insights into how Tutankhamen was buried, why his tomb was the only one to remain intact and the enduring enigma around how he died. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#109] Meat Hooked This film is part the history of butchering, but mostly an entertaining look at the current phenomenon of environmentally conscience twenty and thirtysomethings bringing butchering back as a kind of new green collar job. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, July 13, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too