Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, June 29, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, June 29, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10660] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32148] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2934] Tavis talks to Stax Records' soul legend Booker T. about his latest project. The 4-time Grammy winner reflects on his five decades in the music business and demonstrates his immense talent with a preview of his latest project, "Sound the Alarm." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Frontline [#2603] The Undertaking Frontline enters the world of Thomas Lynch, a poet and undertaker whose family for three generations has cared for both the living and the dead in a small Michigan town. Through the intimate stories of families coming to terms with grief, mortality, and a funeral's rituals, the film illuminates the heartbreak and beauty in the journey taken between the living and the dead when someone dies. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1643] SUPREME COURT DECISIONS - Tim O'Brien analyzes the important Supreme Court decisions on gay marriage, voting rights and affirmative action that came down earlier this week.
    DECISION REACTION -Managing editor Kim Lawton reports on the widespread religious reaction to the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage.
    DECISION ANALYSIS - Host Bob Abernethy discusses the Supreme Court decisions, their import, reaction to them and what it means for those affected, with Kim Lawton and Tim O'Brien.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1001] Women, Investing & Retirement, Part 1 In part one of Consuelo Mack WealthTrack's two-part series on women, investing and retirement, Morgan Stanley's award-winning financial advisor Ami Forte and GenSpring's Senior Strategist Jewelle Bickford discuss why the traditional financial planning approach doesn't work for women. duration 27:26   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2216H] WENDY DAVIS AND THE TEXAS ABORTION BATTLE - Texas State Senator Wendy Davis' rise to women's rights stardom.
    SAME-SEX MARRIAGE RULINGS - What's next and how it affects the future of the LGBT community and the nation.
    FLEXISM - Employers are finding new ways to adapt to their employees' needs.
    Panelists: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Author and Political Analyst Lara Brown, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) and Center for American Progress' Advisor for LGBT Policy & Racial Justice Aisha Moodie-Mills (for the gay marriage segment).
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#205] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Henry Ford: American Experience Henry Ford's car transformed the lives of millions, and redrew the grid of the United States and much of the world. His assembly line changed the character of modern industry, and his Five Dollar Day laid the foundation for the creation of the American middle class. A bundle of contradictions, Ford was at once forward and backward-looking, innovative and close-minded, generous and mean-spirited. The same man who helped liberate millions from social isolation with his Model T also trapped thousands in a workplace prison where they were forbidden to sit or talk. The same Ford who welcomed African Americans and disabled people into his factories was a bigot who broadcast to the world his vitriolic hatred of Jews and exhibited devastating cruelty to his own son. This biography draws upon a rich archival record and recent scholarship to provide a revealing portrait of a complex, pivotal and ultimately flawed figure. duration 1:56:16   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#148] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2511H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5252H] A number of blockbuster decisions were handed down by the Supreme Court this week dealing with same-sex marriage and voting rights. But the justices held off on ruling on the validity of affirmative action in school admissions by sending that case back to the lower courts. < br />In two landmark decisions, the high court struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and refused to reinstate a ban on same-sex marriages in California. The decisions appear to have laid the legal groundwork for future cases challenging state laws banning gay marriage but neither decision addressed whether same-sex marriage is a fundamental right under the US Constitution. While supporters of gay rights are celebrating, opponents vow to continue their fight to preserve traditional marriage.
    Earlier in the week, the sharply divided Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act that requires states and local districts with a history of discrimination to get federal approval to change voting laws. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled the formula to determine which places need monitoring is out of date and ruled that Congress needs to revise the provision.
    And in a decision about affirmative action, the high court questioned whether race should be a determinant in deciding college admissions at the University of Texas. The court sent the case to the lower court for further review saying that school needs to show that there are, "no workable race-neutral alternatives."
    Joining Gwen Ifill to discuss the legal and policy implications as well as the political fallout from this week's Supreme Court decisions: Pete Williams of NBC News, Joan Biskupic of Reuters, Dan Balz of The Washington Post, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2435H] June 28, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GAY MARRIAGE VICTORIES - Gay rights advocates celebrated historic victories this week when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and also upheld a lower court ruling finding California's ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The two rulings will have major legal ramifications at both the federal and state level. What do the court's decisions mean and when will gay couples be allowed to legally marry in California? Also, how do the SCOTUS rulings on affirmative action and voting rights impact California?
    PRESIDENT OBAMA'S CLIMATE PLAN - President Obama this week called for sweeping executive action to combat the effects of climate change before a cheering crowd of environmentalists in Washington, D.C. One major proposal is modeled after California's ambitious climate change goals and pushes for a national cap-and-trade bill. Other initiatives include eliminating tax loopholes for big oil and creating policies that address the impact of severe weather.
    POSSIBLE BART STRIKE - Members of BART's two largest unions have voted to authorize a strike which could result in transit chaos for thousands of commuters as early as next Monday. Fears are building that train operators, station agents and maintenance workers could walk off the job if a deal is not reached by Sunday. Negotiations between the union and BART management have broken down over wages, health and retirement benefits, and safety issues.
    Guests: Vik Amar, UC Davis School of Law; Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News; Michael Cabanatuan, SF Chronicle.
    Please Note: This Week In Northern California will not air the weekend beginning July 5th. It returns Friday 7/12.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17179Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2216H] WENDY DAVIS AND THE TEXAS ABORTION BATTLE - Texas State Senator Wendy Davis' rise to women's rights stardom.
    SAME-SEX MARRIAGE RULINGS - What's next and how it affects the future of the LGBT community and the nation.
    FLEXISM - Employers are finding new ways to adapt to their employees' needs.
    Panelists: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Author and Political Analyst Lara Brown, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) and Center for American Progress' Advisor for LGBT Policy & Racial Justice Aisha Moodie-Mills (for the gay marriage segment).
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#326H] JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. On the second of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the United States moving forward, Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield explores how malpractice lawsuits contribute to rising healthcare costs. Correspondent William Brangham travels to Denmark, where medical disputes are settled by experts without ever going to court. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#225H] The Faces of America's Hungry * Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. And yet Congress can't pass a Farm Bill because our representatives continue to fight over how many billions to slash from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The debate is filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But a new documentary, A Place at the Table, paints a truer picture of America's poor.
    This week Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. The story of American families facing food insecurity is as frustrating as it is heartbreaking, because the truth is as avoidable as it is tragic.
    "If we could think about poverty during childhood as a type of a disease, if we could pay as much attention to poverty for children as we pay attention to infectious disease, we might be able to do something in this country," Chilton explains to Bill.
    * Also, on the program, journalist Greg Kaufmann - who's dedicated himself to the beat of poverty, food and politics - talks about the need to meet and accurately understand Americans in poverty to truly help them. A frequent contributor for The Nation, Kaufmann claims that the poor have been stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other programs low-income Americans rely on to survive.
    "People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare," Kaufmann tells Bill. "50% of the jobs in this country pay less than $34,000 a year. 25% pay less than the poverty line for a family of 4 - which is $23,000 a year. So if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#227] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Out & Proud In Chicago Hosted by actress Jane Lynch, this program charts the history of Chicago's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community from the 19th century to the present. The documentary profiles famous and unsung LGBT Chicagoans: a retired schoolteacher, a successful businessman, a community activist, a bar owner, a lawyer and a social service worker. Each recounts their own extraordinary stories of struggle and success - from coming-out experiences and supporting anti-discrimination laws to founding Chicago's earliest gay-rights organization and defying the federal government's indifference towards people with AIDS. Through their voices, this program tells the story of the LGBT citizens who helped shape the face of a city. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:30 pm
    In My Lifetime This program thoughtfully and thoroughly examines the 68-year history of nuclear weapons - the most destructive force ever invented. Filmed in Europe, Japan and the US, it focuses on the continuing struggle of citizens, scientists and political leaders working to reduce or eliminate the atomic threat, while others search for ways to build nuclear weapons.
    In contemporary interviews, former heads of state, UN representatives, figures from the nuclear establishment, Manhattan Project scientists, Nobel Peace- and Pulitzer Prize-winners, military personnel and atomic-bomb survivors recount the birth of the nuclear age and detail the key developments that followed. The film shifts between historical events, including the Cuban missile crisis and the historic 1986 Reykjavik Summit between Reagan and Gorbachev to present-day efforts to contain the spread of nuclear weapons. It also details the obstacles - political and human- impeding a solution to this complex global issue.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 pm
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    New State of Mind: Ending The Stigma of Mental Illness Examination of the stigma and discrimination facing people with mental health challenges, the efforts underway to promote understanding and acceptance, and stories of individuals from all walks of life who've overcome mental illness to achieve success and happiness. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3127] Topics: Supremes Rule on Gay Marriage; Obama in Africa. Panelists: Michelle Bernard, Author; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5252H] A number of blockbuster decisions were handed down by the Supreme Court this week dealing with same-sex marriage and voting rights. But the justices held off on ruling on the validity of affirmative action in school admissions by sending that case back to the lower courts. < br />In two landmark decisions, the high court struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and refused to reinstate a ban on same-sex marriages in California. The decisions appear to have laid the legal groundwork for future cases challenging state laws banning gay marriage but neither decision addressed whether same-sex marriage is a fundamental right under the US Constitution. While supporters of gay rights are celebrating, opponents vow to continue their fight to preserve traditional marriage.
    Earlier in the week, the sharply divided Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the historic 1965 Voting Rights Act that requires states and local districts with a history of discrimination to get federal approval to change voting laws. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled the formula to determine which places need monitoring is out of date and ruled that Congress needs to revise the provision.
    And in a decision about affirmative action, the high court questioned whether race should be a determinant in deciding college admissions at the University of Texas. The court sent the case to the lower court for further review saying that school needs to show that there are, "no workable race-neutral alternatives."
    Joining Gwen Ifill to discuss the legal and policy implications as well as the political fallout from this week's Supreme Court decisions: Pete Williams of NBC News, Joan Biskupic of Reuters, Dan Balz of The Washington Post, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2435H] June 28, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    GAY MARRIAGE VICTORIES - Gay rights advocates celebrated historic victories this week when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and also upheld a lower court ruling finding California's ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The two rulings will have major legal ramifications at both the federal and state level. What do the court's decisions mean and when will gay couples be allowed to legally marry in California? Also, how do the SCOTUS rulings on affirmative action and voting rights impact California?
    PRESIDENT OBAMA'S CLIMATE PLAN - President Obama this week called for sweeping executive action to combat the effects of climate change before a cheering crowd of environmentalists in Washington, D.C. One major proposal is modeled after California's ambitious climate change goals and pushes for a national cap-and-trade bill. Other initiatives include eliminating tax loopholes for big oil and creating policies that address the impact of severe weather.
    POSSIBLE BART STRIKE - Members of BART's two largest unions have voted to authorize a strike which could result in transit chaos for thousands of commuters as early as next Monday. Fears are building that train operators, station agents and maintenance workers could walk off the job if a deal is not reached by Sunday. Negotiations between the union and BART management have broken down over wages, health and retirement benefits, and safety issues.
    Guests: Vik Amar, UC Davis School of Law; Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News; Michael Cabanatuan, SF Chronicle.
    Please Note: This Week In Northern California will not air the weekend beginning July 5th. It returns Friday 7/12.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1212] Honduras & El Salvador Brianna explores Honduras and El Salvador, two of Central America's most rewarding destinations. In Honduras, she swims with dolphins, spends the day at a banana plantation, visits the Mayan ruins of Copan and learns how to roll cigars in Santa Rosa de Copan. Next she heads to El Salvador, where she climbs the Izalco volcano, treks through waterfalls in El Imposible National Park, visits with a former guerrilla commander at the Guazapa volcano, enjoys a rodeo fiesta in San Luis del Carmen and ascends the still-active Santa Ana volcano, the highest in the country. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2703H] Black Mamba The black mamba is one of Africa's most dangerous and feared snakes, known for being very aggressive when disturbed. Rearing up with its head four feet above the ground, it strikes with deadly precision, delivering venom that is packed with three different kinds of toxins and is ten times more deadly than needed to kill an adult human. Without treatment the mortality rate is 100%, the highest among all venomous snakes in the world. Until now, little has been known about the black mamba's natural behavior in the wild because in Africa most people kill a black mamba on sight and feel lucky to have done so. But in the tiny country of Swaziland in southern Africa, a team of herpetologists has an entirely different "take" on these creatures and hopes their six-week study will change public perception of what they feel is the world's most misunderstood snake. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3507H] Ape Genius Chimps, orangutans, gorillas, and bonobos -- seem to have rich emotional lives similar to our own. A new generation of investigators is revealing the mental capabilities of great apes. And our evolutionary next-of-kin are turning out to be far smarter than most experts ever imagined. duration 55:34   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Boyhood Shadows "One in six boys is sexually molested by the age of 16." This documentary tells a gripping story that began with Glenn as a young boy under the power of a sexual predator. The narrative chronicles Glenn's struggle as he tries to make sense of this abuse and his life, telling no one. After suffering decades of addiction, Glenn breaks the silence, describing his past... funny, poignant, sad... poignant, sad... finally gaining redemption. Glenn claims he is alive today because he finally spoke out about his abuse, "There is no shame in being a victim!" Today he directs a sober living facility in Los Angeles. duration 59:00   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#103] La Americana When nine-year-old Carla suffers a life-threatening accident, her mother, Carmen, must leave her behind and make the dangerous and illegal journey from Bolivia to the U.S., where she hopes to earn enough to save her daughter's life. Working in New York to support Carla's medical needs, Carmen struggles in vain to legalize her immigration status, and wrestles with the prospect of never seeing her daughter again. Then, after six years of separation, Congress proposes "amnesty" legislation that could allow Carmen and Carla to be reunited at last. Filmed across three countries in a captivating cinematic narrative, LA AMERICANA is Carmen's story, and the story of millions of illegal immigrants who must leave their families behind to pursue the elusive American dream. duration 1:29:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, June 29, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too