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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, June 22, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, June 22, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10655] Protests in Brazil Escalate * Debate Over Language Requirements in Immigration Reform Bill * Is Money Really the Root of All Evil? * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * "Does Jesus Really Love Me?" Book Discussion duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32143] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, a wild week on Wall Street comes to a close. But with the end of the quarter and first half quickly approaching, will we see even bigger swings next week? And, remember Jeff Skilling? The ex-Enron CEO was at the center of one of the most notorious financial scandals and today his prison sentence was reduced. NBR has a report from the courthouse in Houston. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2929] Tavis talks with W. Richard West, Jr., president and CEO of the Autry National Center of the American West, who explains his mission to tell the compelling story of the American West and the people who created its history and shape the present and future. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1304H] Deaf Jam National poetry slams for youth have been gaining momentum, but few, if any, deaf teens have ever been included in these contests. In this documentary, a group of New York City deaf teens reveal their passions, frustrations and senses of humor as they discover American Sign Language poetry - eventually stepping into the world of the youth poetry slams with their hearing peers. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1642] PRISONS AND THE MENTALLY ILL - In the US the largest institutions housing the mentally ill are jails. On any given day Cook County jail in Chicago holds about 10,000 inmates and on average 1 in 4 is suffering from some kind of mental illness. Cook Country Sheriff Tom Dart tells Lucky Severson of the moral and financial costs of dealing this way with the mentally troubled and others describe their programs to house the mentally ill and keep them out of jail.
    TAYLOR BRANCH ON 1963 - This year marks the 50th anniversary of several key moments in struggle for civil rights. "1963 is without a doubt the breakthrough pivotal year" for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement, says Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch, who recently released a new work, The King Years. Kim Lawton talks with Branch about some of the major milestones and the central role churches played in all of them.
    SUPREME COURT - Tim O'Brien reports on upcoming major rulings, including on affirmative action, about to be issued by the Supreme Court.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#952] Active Vs. Passive This week: WT tackles the active versus passive investing debate. Which strategy is best for you? Vanguard's Daniel Wallick and award-winning financial planner Gregg Fisher argue the pros and cons. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2215H] HUMAN TRAFFICKING AS A DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN ISSUE. We speak with DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano.
    THE SNAP CHALLENGE: For one week almost 30 congressmen and women tried to dine for less than $5 per day.
    NURSING RESEARCH. Why the US is experiencing a shortage of nurses.
    Panelists: Women's Campaign Fund President Sam Bennett, The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood, Host of NPR's Focus Point Dr. Avis Jones DeWeever, Republican Commentator Tara Setmayer.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#107] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    John D. Rockefeller: American Experience For decades, the Rockefeller name was despised in America - associated with John D. Rockefeller Sr.'s feared monopoly, Standard Oil. By the end of his life, Rockefeller had given away half his fortune - but even his vast philanthropy could not erase the memory of his predatory business practices. His only son, John D. Rockefeller Jr., would dedicate his life to recasting the family image. In the quest for redemption and respectability, Junior would give away hundreds of millions of dollars, and would insist that his six children behave impeccably. Their contributions transformed America. When he died at age 86, Junior left his six children and 22 grandchildren an invaluable inheritance: a name that stood not for corporate greed, but for "the well-being of mankind." This episode was derived from the original series "The Rockefellers." duration 1:55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#224H] United States of ALEC: A Follow-Up This week, Moyers & Company follows up and expands on a breakthrough 2012 report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense without public knowledge.
    Using interviews, documents, and field reporting, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests." Updated coverage includes new examples of corporate influence on state legislation and lawmakers, the growing public protest against ALEC's big business-serving agenda, and internal tactics ALEC is instituting to further shroud its actions and intentions.
    Even with increased scrutiny, ALEC's influence continues to grow. In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it.
    "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," says Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs including the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#147] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2510H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5251H] Peter Baker of The New York Times will report on the success and setbacks President Obama had at this week's G8 summit and how his influence on the world stage has changed since his first term in office.
    * Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will explain attempts by the US to start talks with the Taliban to help end the 12-year old Afghan war and why President Hamid Karzai has suddenly decided to boycott the peace talks.
    * Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the politics surrounding a tentative bipartisan deal on immigration reform in the Senate and the defeat of a sweeping farm bill in the House.
    * Tom Gjelten of NPR will report on the NSA surveillance program and this week's disclosures that it helped foil more than 50 potential terrorist events, as well as news that the FBI has used drones for domestic surveillance here at home.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2434H] June 21, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    OPEN RECORDS BATTLE - A move by Gov. Brown to weaken the California Public Records Act set off a heated controversy among journalists and open government advocates this week, followed by back-peddling from top state Democrats. At the core of the debate is whether the state or local governments should foot the bill for requests for government records.
    SAN CLEMENTE DAM REMOVAL - In what will be the largest dam removal project ever undertaken in California, officials have agreed to tear down the 106-foot-tall San Clemente Dam in Monterey County. The reservoir it holds is now 95 percent silted up and the obsolete dam has been declared seismically unsafe. The removal of the dam will also be good for endangered steelhead trout, which for decades have been blocked from their traditional spawning grounds by the enormous barrier on the Carmel River.
    SAN JOSE SUES MLB - The Oakland A's are itching to relocate from their longtime home at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum to a new proposed stadium in downtown San Jose. But Major League Baseball has thus far blocked the move, claiming the San Francisco Giants hold the territorial rights to the South Bay. This week the city of San Jose sued Major League Baseball, challenging the geographic rights in order to allow the A's to make the move south.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Mark Purdy, San Jose Mercury News; and Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News.
    INTERVIEW WITH CONGRESSMAN JARED HUFFMAN - Huffman, a Marin County Democrat, is a cosponsor of the Student Loan Relief Act (HR1595). If Congress doesn't act before July 1, federally subsidized loans are set to double from the current historically low rate of 3.4% to 6.8%. With nearly half of California college students borrowing money to go to school, the hike would mean thousands of dollars more of debt. We hear from Congressman Huffman on efforts being made to freeze the rate.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17172Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2215H] HUMAN TRAFFICKING AS A DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN ISSUE. We speak with DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano.
    THE SNAP CHALLENGE: For one week almost 30 congressmen and women tried to dine for less than $5 per day.
    NURSING RESEARCH. Why the US is experiencing a shortage of nurses.
    Panelists: Women's Campaign Fund President Sam Bennett, The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood, Host of NPR's Focus Point Dr. Avis Jones DeWeever, Republican Commentator Tara Setmayer.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3126] Topics: G-8 Speaks Out on Syria; Did Ben Bernanke Get the Boot? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#325H] Main Street: Findlay, Ohio How many times during the past several years have you heard one commentator or another express the same familiar lament? "We just don't make anything anymore." Of course, it's not true. Not even close. No country exports more than the United States except China. What is true is that millions of manufacturing jobs have been lost, shipped overseas where labor costs are often dramatically lower.
    And that's had a profound effect on many factory towns across the US, particularly in the industrial heartland - The Midwest. What is the state of American manufacturing today? Is it coming back, as the president says? And will we be able to compete once again?
    To learn more, NTK traveled to Findlay, Ohio, a manufacturing town that is still growing even as towns close by have struggled. Correspondent John Larson reports from Main Street. Maria Hinojosa anchors the broadcast.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#224H] United States of ALEC: A Follow-Up This week, Moyers & Company follows up and expands on a breakthrough 2012 report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense without public knowledge.
    Using interviews, documents, and field reporting, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests." Updated coverage includes new examples of corporate influence on state legislation and lawmakers, the growing public protest against ALEC's big business-serving agenda, and internal tactics ALEC is instituting to further shroud its actions and intentions.
    Even with increased scrutiny, ALEC's influence continues to grow. In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it.
    "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," says Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs including the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#103H] Destination Baja A remarkable success story of how local fishing people developed a whale-watching co-op that now caters to tourists from all over the world. The co-op runs not only the tourist accommodations, but also polices the lagoon, regulates access to the whales, and preserves most of the area as a quiet sanctuary for the whales and their calves. And it's not just whales -- there are now several other highly successful, self-regulated fishing co-ops along Baja's Pacific coast. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#226] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    History Detectives [#806H] Korean War Letter, Diana, Lookout Mt. Painting Rhonda Bradley never met her father. He's still listed Missing in Action from the Korean War. In a letter dated 1953, her father mentioned a man he said saved his life. Eduardo Pagan researches the "Korean War Letter" to find the man Rhonda believes is a hero.
    Then Tukufu Zuberi searches for the author of Diana: A Strange Biography. Could "Diana" be groundbreaking literature as the first widely published and true lesbian autobiography?
    Then, Wes Cowan digs into the mystery of the "Lookout Mt. Painting," depicting a Civil War battle. How did the artist of this painting end up in prison at the Rock Island Arsenal?
    duration 55:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1417] The Revolutionary Optimists Children in the slums of Calcutta are starting a revolution. Called to action by visionary former attorney Amlan Ganguly, the 'Daredevils' have already made radical health and sanitation improvements in one of the city's poorest slums -- awakening a neglected populace to the real possibility of change. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Inlaws & Outlaws The award-winning documentary Inlaws & Outlaws weaves together the true stories of couples and singles, gay and straight, to embrace what we have in common: we love. While timely and topical, the film dispenses with the politics and judgments that often divide us and focuses, instead, on the experiences of everyday storytellers -ages 4 to 80. The feature is accompanied by a short, Just Marriage: From Outlaws to Inlaws. As the topic of same-sex marriage has moved centerstage over the past eight years, so too have the lives of Inlaws & Outlaws' subjects. Filmmaker and storyteller Drew Emery carries the stories to the present in an engaging companion to the feature. duration 1:55:32   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3126] Topics: G-8 Speaks Out on Syria; Did Ben Bernanke Get the Boot? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5251H] Peter Baker of The New York Times will report on the success and setbacks President Obama had at this week's G8 summit and how his influence on the world stage has changed since his first term in office.
    * Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will explain attempts by the US to start talks with the Taliban to help end the 12-year old Afghan war and why President Hamid Karzai has suddenly decided to boycott the peace talks.
    * Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the politics surrounding a tentative bipartisan deal on immigration reform in the Senate and the defeat of a sweeping farm bill in the House.
    * Tom Gjelten of NPR will report on the NSA surveillance program and this week's disclosures that it helped foil more than 50 potential terrorist events, as well as news that the FBI has used drones for domestic surveillance here at home.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2434H] June 21, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    OPEN RECORDS BATTLE - A move by Gov. Brown to weaken the California Public Records Act set off a heated controversy among journalists and open government advocates this week, followed by back-peddling from top state Democrats. At the core of the debate is whether the state or local governments should foot the bill for requests for government records.
    SAN CLEMENTE DAM REMOVAL - In what will be the largest dam removal project ever undertaken in California, officials have agreed to tear down the 106-foot-tall San Clemente Dam in Monterey County. The reservoir it holds is now 95 percent silted up and the obsolete dam has been declared seismically unsafe. The removal of the dam will also be good for endangered steelhead trout, which for decades have been blocked from their traditional spawning grounds by the enormous barrier on the Carmel River.
    SAN JOSE SUES MLB - The Oakland A's are itching to relocate from their longtime home at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum to a new proposed stadium in downtown San Jose. But Major League Baseball has thus far blocked the move, claiming the San Francisco Giants hold the territorial rights to the South Bay. This week the city of San Jose sued Major League Baseball, challenging the geographic rights in order to allow the A's to make the move south.
    Guests: Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Mark Purdy, San Jose Mercury News; and Paul Rogers, SJ Mercury News.
    INTERVIEW WITH CONGRESSMAN JARED HUFFMAN - Huffman, a Marin County Democrat, is a cosponsor of the Student Loan Relief Act (HR1595). If Congress doesn't act before July 1, federally subsidized loans are set to double from the current historically low rate of 3.4% to 6.8%. With nearly half of California college students borrowing money to go to school, the hike would mean thousands of dollars more of debt. We hear from Congressman Huffman on efforts being made to freeze the rate.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#103H] Destination Baja A remarkable success story of how local fishing people developed a whale-watching co-op that now caters to tourists from all over the world. The co-op runs not only the tourist accommodations, but also polices the lagoon, regulates access to the whales, and preserves most of the area as a quiet sanctuary for the whales and their calves. And it's not just whales -- there are now several other highly successful, self-regulated fishing co-ops along Baja's Pacific coast. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1211] Georgia & Armenia Ian's travels begin in Yerevan, Armenia's capital. He visits the rock-hewn Gerhard Church, Lake Sevan and the Armenian Genocide Memorial in the shadow of Mount Ararat. In Georgia, he explores the capital Tbilisi and the seaside resort Batumi before heading out into the Caucasus Mountains. In the village of Ushguli, he experiences the roots of Georgian song and dance and then visits the carved city of Vardzia before embarking on a two-day trek up Mount Kazbek, the highest peak in the Eastern Caucasus. duration 57:22   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Saving Songbirds Travel from New England to Costa Rica and Jamaica to meet some of the most colorful and melodic migratory birds and the people who are dedicated to saving them. Meet researchers who employ creative means to assess the health of bird populations, and grassroots efforts by Vermont school children to help re-forest the mountains of Costa Rica. Also featured are scientists in Cape May, NJ, who track large flocks of migrating songbirds in total darkness, and Costa Rican coffee farmers practicing bird-friendly methods of cultivation and processing. Avid bird watchers Samuel Habib and Andrea LeBlanc show the personal side of why the survival of songbirds is so important to us all. duration 56:49   TVG
  • 10:00 pm
    John D. Rockefeller: American Experience For decades, the Rockefeller name was despised in America - associated with John D. Rockefeller Sr.'s feared monopoly, Standard Oil. By the end of his life, Rockefeller had given away half his fortune - but even his vast philanthropy could not erase the memory of his predatory business practices. His only son, John D. Rockefeller Jr., would dedicate his life to recasting the family image. In the quest for redemption and respectability, Junior would give away hundreds of millions of dollars, and would insist that his six children behave impeccably. Their contributions transformed America. When he died at age 86, Junior left his six children and 22 grandchildren an invaluable inheritance: a name that stood not for corporate greed, but for "the well-being of mankind." This episode was derived from the original series "The Rockefellers." duration 1:55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#112] 90 Miles Probing and thoughtful, Juan Carlos Zaldvar's personal memoir offers a rare glimpse into Cuba, a country as mythologized to Americans as the US is to the rest of the world. The Cuban-born filmmaker recounts the strange fate that brought him as a teenage communist to exile in Miami in 1980 during the dramatic Mariel boatlift. Zaldvar uses news clips, family photos and home movies to depict the emotional journey of an immigrant father and son struggling to understand the historical and individual forces shaping their relationships and identities in a new country. A Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) Co-presentation. A Diverse Voices Project Selection. duration 1:28:00   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, June 22, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too