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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, June 8, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, June 8, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10645] The President Vigorously Defends NSA Surveillance * Sectarian Politics in Lebanon Strained by Syrian Civil War * Columnists Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze the Week's News * A Chinese Woman and Her Search for Her Dissident Father duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32133] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the economy added 175,000 jobs in May, sparking a rally in stocks. But are Americans feeling better about the labor market and what does it say about the Fed's next move? Plus, how much surveillance is necessary to keep us safe now that we know the government has access to the servers of companies like Microsoft, Facebook, Google and Yahoo? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2919] Tavis talks with writer-director Joss Whedon - the man behind such acclaimed projects as The Avengers and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The Oscar-nominated writer and series showrunner talks about his latest projects: the film Much Ado About Nothing and the upcoming series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Grove, The More Americans have been lost to AIDS than in all the US wars since 1900. And the pandemic has killed 22 million people worldwide. But few know about the existence of the National AIDS Memorial, a 7-acre grove hidden in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. This program chronicles this garden's transformation from a neglected eyesore to landscaped sanctuary to national memorial. The film shows how a community in crisis found healing and remembrance, and how the seeds of a few visionary environmentalists blossomed into something larger than they could have imagined. But as the Grove's stakeholders seek broader public recognition through an international design competition, a battle erupts over what constitutes an appropriate memorial for the AIDS pandemic. What does it mean to be a national memorial? And how do we mark a time of unimaginable loss? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1640] MASS INCARCERATION - More than 40 years after the civil rights movement that ended legal segregation, African American men are 6 times more likely than whites to be imprisoned, especially for drug offenses, in what has been called a "human rights nightmare." As Deborah Potter reports, churches often provide ministries to prison inmates - but insufficient support when those inmates are released and in need of jobs and housing that could prevent them from returning to prison. (OB: January 13, 2013)
    JONI EARECKSON TADA: BREAST CANCER UPDATE - Actress Angelina Jolie's announcement last month that she had undergone a preventative double mastectomy to reduce her chances of developing breast cancer put a new spotlight on the disease. According to the American Cancer Society, about 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point. Managing editor Kim Lawton talked with popular evangelical author and speaker Joni Eareckson Tada, one of the longest surviving quadriplegics on record, about her battle with the disease and how it affected her marriage and her faith. (OB: October 26, 2012)
    WHIRLING DERVISHES - Like other major religions, Islam has a mystical branch, Sufism, which teaches many ways to experience spiritual union with the divine. One of those paths - dating from the 13th century - is dance, specifically the dancing of whirling dervishes, who were followers of the poet Rumi. Manjula Kumar, a program manager at the Smithsonian Institution, describes the origins and meaning of whirling dervish dancing. (OB: February 1, 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#950] Financial Thought Leaders: Robert Shiller Why is renowned Yale economist Robert Shiller, who predicted the bursting of the tech and housing bubbles, now calling the bond market "dangerous?" A "Financial Thought Leader" and visionary, Shiller shares his views and advice on the stock, bond and housing markets on this week's WT. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2213] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#105] duration 28:08   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Company of Heroes Easy Company, the 2nd Battalion of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division, widely known as the "Screaming Eagles," remains one of the most revered combat units in US military history. The Army company's legendary exploits in World War II inspired Stephen Ambrose's book, Band of Brothers, and the Emmy-winning HBO miniseries of the same name. Following two years of hard training, the soldiers of Easy Company parachuted into Normandy on D-Day and, later, into Holland for Operation Market Garden. They fought their way through Belgium, France and Germany, survived overwhelming odds, liberated concentration camps, and drank a victory toast in April 1945 at Hitler's hideout in the Alps.
    In 2009, 20 of the few remaining survivors from Easy Company shared their rarely told stories of sacrifice and courage for Marcus Brotherton's oral-history book project, We Who Are Alive and Remain: Untold Stories From the Band of Brothers. In this documentary, those same veterans - along with the families of three deceased others - recount the horrors and the victories, the bonds they made, the tears and blood they shed, and the friends they lost.
    duration 57:10   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Navy Heroes of Normandy On June 6, 1944, more than 52,000 American sailors on board thousands of ships arrived off a quiet stretch of coast in Normandy, France. Operation Neptune-Overlord was the largest amphibious and landing assault operation in the history of war. On this historic day, the U. S. Navy would prove critical to the success of the Allied invasion of Western Europe. NAVY HEROES OF NORMANDY spotlights a dedicated group of Navy veterans who set out to ensure that the crucial role they played on that day would never be forgotten. duration 54:00   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#222H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#145] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2508H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5249H] * The National Security Agency (NSA) is reportedly collecting millions of Verizon customers' telephone records. Under the top-secret order, the government cannot record calls but it can obtain the telephone numbers, location, time and duration of calls. The Obama administration defends the order saying it is a critical tool in protecting the nation from terrorist threats. And while some top Republican and Democratic members of the Senate Intelligence Committee support the practice, key House Democrats are calling for an investigation into the NSA. Pete Williams of NBC News will report on why these new revelations are reigniting the debate over data mining and the scope of government surveillance since the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.
    * This week President Barack Obama announced a major shakeup of his national security team. He appointed UN Ambassador Rice to succeed national security adviser Tom Donilon. Rice has been the target of harsh criticism from congressional Republicans over her handling of last year's deadly attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya. The president also nominated White House aide and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Samantha Power to succeed Rice at the United Nations. David Sanger of The New York Times will take a closer look at the president's second-term foreign policy team. Plus he'll preview this weekend's crucial summit in California between President Obama and China's new President Xi Jinping.
    * Lawmakers continue to work on a plan to change how the armed forces deal with an epidemic of sexual assaults in the military. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will report on a range of measures being considered to protect female and male victims who file assault complaints as well as ways to limit military commanders' ability to overturn convictions for rape and other sexual assaults.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2432] June 7, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    OBAMACARE - President Obama visits Silicon Valley this week during a fundraising swing through the state. Mr. Obama gives a speech in San Jose on Friday to shore up concerns about the Affordable Care Act as the health-care overhaul rolls out in California, ahead of the rest of the nation. KQED's Obamacare Explained: A Guide for Californians provides some answers for consumers.
    CYBERSPYING AND CHINA - Cyber-security will be high on the agenda this week when Chinese President Xi Jinping meets with US President Barack Obama in California. At stake is whether American businesses, and especially Silicon Valley companies like Apple and Google, can protect themselves from hackers snooping for corporate secrets or intellectual property.
    PHONE SURVEILLANCE - A leaked top secret court order reveals that the phone records of millions of US citizens are being collected in bulk by the National Security Administration. The order, first reported by the Guardian, requires the telecommunications giant Verizon to turn over information about all telephone calls in its system during a 3 month period. Top leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee are defending the practice, saying the widespread monitoring effort has been ongoing for several years.
    Guests: Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health; Joseph Menn, Reuters; and Troy Wolverton, San Jose Mercury News.
    REBELS WITH A CAUSE - Bay Area husband and wife team Nancy Kelly and Kenji Yamamoto talk about their latest film "Rebels With A Cause." The documentary spotlights ordinary citizens who fought to preserve open space in what are now the Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. "Rebels With A Cause" is currently playing in Bay Area theaters.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17158Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2206H] ENVIRONMENTAL RACISM: Does pollution disproportionately affect women of color? Why the NAACP is taking on this issue.
    FLAME RETARDANT DANGERS: Chemicals in furniture that are meant to keep you safe may cause big health problems.
    Panelists: Dr. Avis Jones-DeWeever, Host of National Public Radio Focus Point; Jennifer Marshall, The Heritage Foundation; Amanda Terkel, The Huffington Post; Rina Shah, Republican Strategist; Renee Sharp, Environmental Working Group Director of Research.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3124] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#323H] SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. Correspondent John Larson travels to Ohio to assess how workers there are faring after the loss of millions of manufacturing jobs over the past 35 years. It's the fourth in Need to Know's series of "Main Street" reports. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#222H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Unlocking The Secrets of Our Cells - The Nobel Prize Inside all of us exists a series of micro-worlds at the cellular, molecular and atomic level, constantly working to maintain our existence, but of which we are blissfully unaware. The 2012 Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine, Physics and Chemistry, have all unveiled new knowledge about this micro-world; this program explores their work, going on a journey through the micro-layers, showing how the discoveries they have made influence all our lives. Inside all of our cells is the next - molecular- level of the micro-world. The 2012 laureates in Chemistry identified and mapped the molecules that enable cells, and therefore our bodies, to react to the outside world. Robert Lefkowitz takes us through the long journey he went through to identify and map the protein responsible for transmitting outside influences into the cell so it can react - for example, in the adrenaline response in the body. He describes his and Brian Kobilka's work - and how it felt when they realized they'd made their groundbreaking discovery. The micro-world is going on all around us and, were it not for the work of this year's laureates, many of its secrets would still remain hidden. duration 28:51   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#224] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    City of Borders In the heart of Jerusalem, people of all nationalities, religious affiliations, and sexual orientations gather and find peace in an unlikely place: a gay bar. duration 56:40   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    America Reframed [#116] Trembling Before God A cinematic portrait of various gay Orthodox Jews who struggle to reconcile their faith and their sexual orientation. duration 1:46:58   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Intelligence Squared [#103] Does Science Refute God? On the fundamental question--evolution or creation?--Americans are on the fence. According to one survey, while 61% of Americans believe we have evolved over time, 22% believe this evolution was guided by a higher power, with another 31% on the side of creationism. For some, modern science debunks many of religion's core beliefs, but for others, questions like "Why are we here?" and "How did it all come about?" can only be answered through a belief in the existence of God. Can science and religion co-exist? duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3124] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5249H] * The National Security Agency (NSA) is reportedly collecting millions of Verizon customers' telephone records. Under the top-secret order, the government cannot record calls but it can obtain the telephone numbers, location, time and duration of calls. The Obama administration defends the order saying it is a critical tool in protecting the nation from terrorist threats. And while some top Republican and Democratic members of the Senate Intelligence Committee support the practice, key House Democrats are calling for an investigation into the NSA. Pete Williams of NBC News will report on why these new revelations are reigniting the debate over data mining and the scope of government surveillance since the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.
    * This week President Barack Obama announced a major shakeup of his national security team. He appointed UN Ambassador Rice to succeed national security adviser Tom Donilon. Rice has been the target of harsh criticism from congressional Republicans over her handling of last year's deadly attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya. The president also nominated White House aide and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Samantha Power to succeed Rice at the United Nations. David Sanger of The New York Times will take a closer look at the president's second-term foreign policy team. Plus he'll preview this weekend's crucial summit in California between President Obama and China's new President Xi Jinping.
    * Lawmakers continue to work on a plan to change how the armed forces deal with an epidemic of sexual assaults in the military. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will report on a range of measures being considered to protect female and male victims who file assault complaints as well as ways to limit military commanders' ability to overturn convictions for rape and other sexual assaults.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2432] June 7, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    OBAMACARE - President Obama visits Silicon Valley this week during a fundraising swing through the state. Mr. Obama gives a speech in San Jose on Friday to shore up concerns about the Affordable Care Act as the health-care overhaul rolls out in California, ahead of the rest of the nation. KQED's Obamacare Explained: A Guide for Californians provides some answers for consumers.
    CYBERSPYING AND CHINA - Cyber-security will be high on the agenda this week when Chinese President Xi Jinping meets with US President Barack Obama in California. At stake is whether American businesses, and especially Silicon Valley companies like Apple and Google, can protect themselves from hackers snooping for corporate secrets or intellectual property.
    PHONE SURVEILLANCE - A leaked top secret court order reveals that the phone records of millions of US citizens are being collected in bulk by the National Security Administration. The order, first reported by the Guardian, requires the telecommunications giant Verizon to turn over information about all telephone calls in its system during a 3 month period. Top leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee are defending the practice, saying the widespread monitoring effort has been ongoing for several years.
    Guests: Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health; Joseph Menn, Reuters; and Troy Wolverton, San Jose Mercury News.
    REBELS WITH A CAUSE - Bay Area husband and wife team Nancy Kelly and Kenji Yamamoto talk about their latest film "Rebels With A Cause." The documentary spotlights ordinary citizens who fought to preserve open space in what are now the Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. "Rebels With A Cause" is currently playing in Bay Area theaters.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Unlocking The Secrets of Our Cells - The Nobel Prize Inside all of us exists a series of micro-worlds at the cellular, molecular and atomic level, constantly working to maintain our existence, but of which we are blissfully unaware. The 2012 Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine, Physics and Chemistry, have all unveiled new knowledge about this micro-world; this program explores their work, going on a journey through the micro-layers, showing how the discoveries they have made influence all our lives. Inside all of our cells is the next - molecular- level of the micro-world. The 2012 laureates in Chemistry identified and mapped the molecules that enable cells, and therefore our bodies, to react to the outside world. Robert Lefkowitz takes us through the long journey he went through to identify and map the protein responsible for transmitting outside influences into the cell so it can react - for example, in the adrenaline response in the body. He describes his and Brian Kobilka's work - and how it felt when they realized they'd made their groundbreaking discovery. The micro-world is going on all around us and, were it not for the work of this year's laureates, many of its secrets would still remain hidden. duration 28:51   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1209] Colorado to Utah Holly kicks off her trip in Denver, where she visits the U.S. Mint and enjoys the city's many outdoor pursuits. Next she hikes the Mesa Trail, joins an archaeological research trip at Crow Canyon and delves into the history of the region's ancestral Pueblans. Holly travels to Utah, home to numerous ski resorts, the Great Salt Lake and a plethora of breathtaking national parks - including Arches, Zion and Bryce Canyon. duration 57:10   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    America's Wildest Refuge: Discovering the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Tucked into a remote corner of Alaska, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is a place where wilderness is experienced on an epic scale. From forested lowlands in the south to the towering mountains of the Brooks Range and north to the coastal plains, this is where we can go back in time to see how the earth was before modern civilization. With sweeping views of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, its wildlife, and interviews with those that know it best, Alaska: America's Wildest Refuge is an ecological and historical portrait of this corner of Alaska. Meet the key figures that first identified this area as worthy of protection and worked to preserve it through the National Wildlife Refuge System. Meet Alaskan Native residents that live near the refuge and rely on it to maintain their ancient subsistence way of life. Meet some of the refuge's wildest residents, including musk ox, caribou, and bears, and the scientists studying them. Filmed in stunning high definition, Alaska: America's Wildest Refuge is an ecological and historical portrait of this distant corner of Alaska. Establishment of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge on December 6, 1960 was a milestone in conservation history. In response to concerns about rapid changes to our environment in the post war era, Americans rose to the challenge to preserve special areas including the Arctic Refuge. Here was the opportunity to protect entire ecosystems unfettered by the influence of humans. Later with the passage of the Alaska National Interest Land Conservation Act in 1980, the original range doubled its size - approximately the size of the state of South Carolina - and became the refuge we know today. duration 56:04   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 pm
    Krakatoa This program revisits the events that led to the Indian Ocean's previously most-devastating tsunami, the eruption of the volcano Krakatoa. Using dramatic recreations and CGI, the program brings the May 20, 188 3, eruption to life. The eruption reduced the island of Krakatoa to a third of its former size and sent waves that reportedly topped 100 feet high crashing onto Asian shores, killing 36,000 people. Segments of the program tie the resulting tsunami destruction to the December 26, 2004, tsunami. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 11:30 pm
    Hawaii: Roots of Fire This documentary goes down below the Hawaiian Islands in a search for the hidden forces that drive the planet's largest and most active volcanic system. It follows earth scientists as they work among the volcanoes of the Big Island of Hawaii, pursuing clues and compiling evidence in a quest to shed new light on the mysterious inner Earth process that has been producing giant volcanoes in the middle of the Pacific Ocean for more than 75 million years.
    Scientists have long been puzzled over the source of the huge quantities of lava erupting out of Hawaii's massive volcanoes. Does the lava come from just below the Earth's crust? Or does it come from much deeper, perhaps even as far down as the Earth's core, some 1800 miles below the surface? The film focuses on an international team of scientists who boldly take on these key questions with a major drilling project into the flanks of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest volcano. As their work progresses, another group of scientists embarks on a huge seismic study that deploys instruments on the islands and the seafloor surrounding them. After years of painstaking research, startling new discoveries are made. Not only do the scientists determine where the lava is coming from, but they solve other long-standing mysteries about the workings of Hawaii's magnificent volcanoes.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#116] Trembling Before God A cinematic portrait of various gay Orthodox Jews who struggle to reconcile their faith and their sexual orientation. duration 1:46:58   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, June 8, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too