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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, May 26, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, May 26, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Into Harm's Way The 846 cadets in the West Point Class of 1967 arrived at the United States Military Academy in upstate New York in the early 1960s, during a time of peace and with a commitment to making the military their career. Four years later, the 583 graduates of that class - now commissioned officers in the United States Army - would find themselves embroiled in a strange and unpopular conflict taking place in Southeast Asia. The Class of 1967 would pay a high price in the Vietnam War; 30 of its young men would die in combat while countless others would sustain injuries, both physical and psychological, destined to haunt them for years to come. INTO HARM'S WAY takes an honest and unflinching look at the shadow the Vietnam War continues to cast on this class of West Pointers, while also exploring its unsettled place in the American psyche. Compelling interviews, archival photographs and footage, animated sequences and contemporary clips chronicle the men's experiences - from their challenging first year as plebes to the fierce hand-to-hand jungle combat to their post-Vietnam lives. A collection of West Pointers poignantly share, sometimes with great emotion, their first-hand stories about the carnage of war, the war's impact on their lives and beliefs, and their enduring bonds of brotherhood. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    T. Moffatt Burriss and the Crossing Few know the privilege of being portrayed on the silver screen by Robert Redford, but that's exactly what happened to South Carolinian Moffatt Burriss. Major Cook, Redford's character in "A Bridge Too Far, " was based in part on Burriss' heroic actions during World War II. The 1977 film tells Hollywood's version of the failed attempt to capture several bridges in Operation Market Garden, the largest airborne operation in history. Burriss, now of Columbia, was a paratrooper from Anderson in the famed 82nd Airborne Division, and played a critical role in the crossing of the Waal River in Nijmegen, Holland. In their attempt to take the bridge, Burriss and his men were forced to cross the swift river in canvas boats with few paddles. Some were forced to use the butts of their guns to row, leaving them even more vulnerable to attack by the Germans who were easily picking off the soldiers. Burriss, and fellow paratrooper Roy Hanna, of Pinehurst, NC, talk about their harrowing experiences, and their feelings of exasperation when, after finally securing the bridge, the British wouldn't move down the road and rescue their own paratroopers trapped behind enemy lines at Arnhem. The program also portrays Burriss' return to Nijmegan in 2010 for the 65th anniversary of the battle. To commemorate the occasion, Burriss, four days shy of his 90th birthday, parachuted out of an airplane in tandem with a female Dutch paratrooper. During the visit, he also came face to face with the British commander who refused to move. duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#212] Kindergarten Common Core Kindergarten Common Core: We're heading to kindergarten classrooms where many students are getting their very first exposure to the Common Core State Standards. Good foundations for math and literacy start here-but that doesn't mean the students aren't having fun! duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    America Reframed [#123] Men of Hula This program captures the journey of legendary master teacher Robert Cazimero and the only all-male hula school in Hawai'i as they prepare to compete at the world's largest hula festival. Beyond deep-rooted stereotypes of "grass-skirt girls," the film tells a story of Hawaiian pride as the men celebrate their 30th anniversary in continuing the revival of men dancing hula. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Calling My Children Gail Farrow, a devoted mother and wife, died when she was just 27. She left behind four young sons, Ronald Jr., Frank, Kenny and Benny, and her husband Ronald. David Binder began photographing Gail and her family in 1987, documenting Gail's last year of life and her family's early adjustment to continuing without her. With insight and honesty, his film and photographs explore the pieces Gail left-photographs, letters, guidance and memories... Twenty years after her death, Gail's hopes for her family collide with the reality of their lives. Calling My Children is a testament of a family's life and a mother's love. duration 29:08   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    Global Voices [#125] Mai's America/Someday Flowers Bloom A spunky Vietnamese teenager named Mai gets the chance of a lifetime -- to study in the United States. She lands in rural Mississippi, a crazy quilt of self-proclaimed rednecks, cliquish teenagers, South Vietnamese exiles and transvestite soulmates. From cosmopolitan Hanoi to the heart of the Deep South, Mai's unforgettable journey offers an outsider's glimpse inside America.
    Someday Flowers Bloom - explores Chiyoko Lewis' life as she copes with the challenges she faces in Japan and in the United States. After meeting a country musician in Kumamoto, Japan, she learns that love can overcome cultural and physical obstacles.
    duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-S
  • MORNING
  • 6:30 am
    Brooks - The City of 100 Hellos This documentary is about how immigration changes and challenges a cowboy town. It explores how immigrants, refugees and temporary foreign workers from the local meat packing plant are changing and challenging the western cowboy city of Brooks, Alberta, Canada. It also explores the city's 100 year history as it celebrates its centennial anniversary. duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Need To Know [#321H] As the debate over immigration reform continues in Washington DC, NTK offers an inside look at the lives of Latino farm workers. With the continuation of our "Main Street" series, anchor John Larson reports from Salinas, California - home to John Steinbeck and some of the richest farmlands in the world. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#207H] Nature-Deficit Disorder/ Ugo Conti's Spider Boat Learn about local efforts to get kids to play outdoors and discover Proteus, a spider-like sea craft that could change ocean travel. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1638] DECLINE OF BUDDHISM - Thailand is 95% Buddhist, but it is estimated that in the last 30 years the number of monks has declined by more than half. Lucky Severson reports that one reason is economic prosperity and consumerism; another is that while young boys at one time became monks to get free schooling at the temple, Thailand now offers 12 years of free education.
    BOBBY MCFERRIN - Ten-time Grammy Award-winning artist Bobby McFerrin has just released a new album, "spirityouall," which includes his adaptations of traditional African-American spirituals and original devotional songs that he wrote. McFerrin says the new project reflects his deeply-held Christian faith and talks with Kim Lawton about spirituality and the power of music.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#948] Investing Globally Two global investors with world class track records reveal where they are finding opportunities now. Epoch Investment Partners' William Priest searches for yield in a wide universe and Brown Brothers Harriman's Tim Hartch keeps a narrow focus. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#217H] Ric Edelman and his staff explore the risks of "investing" in fine wine, get the lowdown on fixed annuities from top financial advisors and discusses the past 200 years of stock prices with Professor Jeremy Seigel of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2506H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3122] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5247H] In a major address on Thursday, the president unveiled new guidelines for combating terrorism and the administration's use of drones in that fight. This came on the heels of the new disclosure that 4 Americans had been killed in drone strikes since 2009. He also renewed his call to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times tells us what the president's new strategy means.
    * Meanwhile, controversies continued to swirl throughout Washington this week, particularly around the IRS and its extra scrutiny of conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status. Are the questions about "who-knew-what-when" eroding Americans' trust in government? Dan Balz of the Washington Post has perspective and analysis of the impact on President Obama's standing.
    * The devastating tornado in Oklahoma again put the issue of federal disaster relief front and center this week. Charles Babington of the Associated Press looks at how - in the wake of recent natural disasters - the issue of paying for disaster relief has become a political hot potato.
    * The Senate Judiciary Committee has passed and sent to the full Senate a comprehensive immigration reform bill that's sure to stir up controversy on Capitol Hill. Fawn Johnson of National Journal has the latest on the reform push and the next steps for both the Senate and the House.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    Church Divided, A May 24, 2013 This documentary takes viewers to the United Methodist Church's convention in Tampa, FL, where delegates from around the world gather to decide the future of the church and its official policy on gays and lesbians. Progressive Methodists want to amend church doctrine by removing the sentence that identifies the practice of homosexuality as incompatible with Christian teaching, while conservative evangelical Methodists want to retain the church's traditional stance. Who will prevail? duration 27:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#220H] Going to Jail for Justice * In December 2008, during the closing weeks of the Bush White House, 27-year-old environmental activist Tim DeChristopher went to protest the auction of gas and oil drilling rights to more than 150,000 acres of publicly-owned Utah wilderness. But instead of yelling slogans or waving a sign, DeChristopher disrupted the proceedings by starting to bid. Given an auction paddle designating him "Bidder 70", DeChristopher won a dozen land leases worth nearly $2 million. He was arrested for criminal fraud, found guilty, and sentenced to two years in federal prison - even though the new Obama Administration had since declared the oil and gas auction null and void.
    This week, DeChristopher - who was released less than a month ago - joins Bill to talk about the necessity of civil disobedience in the fight for justice, how his jury was ordered to place the strict letter of the law over moral conscience, and the future of the environmental movement. Bidder 70, a new documentary chronicling DeChristopher's legal battle and activism, opened May 17. DeChristopher is co-founder of the grassroots environmental group Peaceful Uprising.
    * Also on the show, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Gretchen Morgenson tells Bill that, 5 years after the country's economic near-collapse, banks are still too big to fail, too big to manage, and too big to trust. Stockholders' reaffirmation of Jamie Dimon as JP Morgan Chase's chairman and CEO this week - despite a year of accusations and investigations at the bank - is further evidence, she says, of an unchecked system that continues to covet profits and eschew accountability, putting our economy and democracy at risk. Morgenson also discusses how behemoth companies like Apple manipulate the system and avail themselves of the biggest tax loopholes money and influence can buy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2506H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3122] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2211H] SEX SCANDALS IN POLITICS: Do sex scandals matter anymore? Discussing Anthony Weiner and Mark Sanford's second runs for office.
    POPE FRANCIS AND 'THE CULT OF MONEY': Pope Francis condemns materialism and issues a call for world financial reform.
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: Former Senator Olympia Snowe's next act.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Kim Gandy, President and CEO of National Network to End Domestic Violence; Genevieve Wood, Conservative Commentator for the Heritage Foundation; Rina Shah, Republican Strategist.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#143] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#207H] Nature-Deficit Disorder/ Ugo Conti's Spider Boat Learn about local efforts to get kids to play outdoors and discover Proteus, a spider-like sea craft that could change ocean travel. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#321H] As the debate over immigration reform continues in Washington DC, NTK offers an inside look at the lives of Latino farm workers. With the continuation of our "Main Street" series, anchor John Larson reports from Salinas, California - home to John Steinbeck and some of the richest farmlands in the world. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#220H] Going to Jail for Justice * In December 2008, during the closing weeks of the Bush White House, 27-year-old environmental activist Tim DeChristopher went to protest the auction of gas and oil drilling rights to more than 150,000 acres of publicly-owned Utah wilderness. But instead of yelling slogans or waving a sign, DeChristopher disrupted the proceedings by starting to bid. Given an auction paddle designating him "Bidder 70", DeChristopher won a dozen land leases worth nearly $2 million. He was arrested for criminal fraud, found guilty, and sentenced to two years in federal prison - even though the new Obama Administration had since declared the oil and gas auction null and void.
    This week, DeChristopher - who was released less than a month ago - joins Bill to talk about the necessity of civil disobedience in the fight for justice, how his jury was ordered to place the strict letter of the law over moral conscience, and the future of the environmental movement. Bidder 70, a new documentary chronicling DeChristopher's legal battle and activism, opened May 17. DeChristopher is co-founder of the grassroots environmental group Peaceful Uprising.
    * Also on the show, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Gretchen Morgenson tells Bill that, 5 years after the country's economic near-collapse, banks are still too big to fail, too big to manage, and too big to trust. Stockholders' reaffirmation of Jamie Dimon as JP Morgan Chase's chairman and CEO this week - despite a year of accusations and investigations at the bank - is further evidence, she says, of an unchecked system that continues to covet profits and eschew accountability, putting our economy and democracy at risk. Morgenson also discusses how behemoth companies like Apple manipulate the system and avail themselves of the biggest tax loopholes money and influence can buy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5247H] In a major address on Thursday, the president unveiled new guidelines for combating terrorism and the administration's use of drones in that fight. This came on the heels of the new disclosure that 4 Americans had been killed in drone strikes since 2009. He also renewed his call to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times tells us what the president's new strategy means.
    * Meanwhile, controversies continued to swirl throughout Washington this week, particularly around the IRS and its extra scrutiny of conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status. Are the questions about "who-knew-what-when" eroding Americans' trust in government? Dan Balz of the Washington Post has perspective and analysis of the impact on President Obama's standing.
    * The devastating tornado in Oklahoma again put the issue of federal disaster relief front and center this week. Charles Babington of the Associated Press looks at how - in the wake of recent natural disasters - the issue of paying for disaster relief has become a political hot potato.
    * The Senate Judiciary Committee has passed and sent to the full Senate a comprehensive immigration reform bill that's sure to stir up controversy on Capitol Hill. Fawn Johnson of National Journal has the latest on the reform push and the next steps for both the Senate and the House.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2506H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3122] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Church Divided, A May 24, 2013 This documentary takes viewers to the United Methodist Church's convention in Tampa, FL, where delegates from around the world gather to decide the future of the church and its official policy on gays and lesbians. Progressive Methodists want to amend church doctrine by removing the sentence that identifies the practice of homosexuality as incompatible with Christian teaching, while conservative evangelical Methodists want to retain the church's traditional stance. Who will prevail? duration 27:46   STEREO TVG
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#207H] Nature-Deficit Disorder/ Ugo Conti's Spider Boat Learn about local efforts to get kids to play outdoors and discover Proteus, a spider-like sea craft that could change ocean travel. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#201H] An Evening with Marissa Mayer Meet Marissa Mayer, the new CEO of Yahoo!. Interviewed by NPR's Laura Sydell when she was Google's Vice President of Local, Maps and Location Services, Mayer speaks about her education, being hired as Google's first female engineer and much more. duration 53:13   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#220H] Going to Jail for Justice * In December 2008, during the closing weeks of the Bush White House, 27-year-old environmental activist Tim DeChristopher went to protest the auction of gas and oil drilling rights to more than 150,000 acres of publicly-owned Utah wilderness. But instead of yelling slogans or waving a sign, DeChristopher disrupted the proceedings by starting to bid. Given an auction paddle designating him "Bidder 70", DeChristopher won a dozen land leases worth nearly $2 million. He was arrested for criminal fraud, found guilty, and sentenced to two years in federal prison - even though the new Obama Administration had since declared the oil and gas auction null and void.
    This week, DeChristopher - who was released less than a month ago - joins Bill to talk about the necessity of civil disobedience in the fight for justice, how his jury was ordered to place the strict letter of the law over moral conscience, and the future of the environmental movement. Bidder 70, a new documentary chronicling DeChristopher's legal battle and activism, opened May 17. DeChristopher is co-founder of the grassroots environmental group Peaceful Uprising.
    * Also on the show, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Gretchen Morgenson tells Bill that, 5 years after the country's economic near-collapse, banks are still too big to fail, too big to manage, and too big to trust. Stockholders' reaffirmation of Jamie Dimon as JP Morgan Chase's chairman and CEO this week - despite a year of accusations and investigations at the bank - is further evidence, she says, of an unchecked system that continues to covet profits and eschew accountability, putting our economy and democracy at risk. Morgenson also discusses how behemoth companies like Apple manipulate the system and avail themselves of the biggest tax loopholes money and influence can buy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#123] Men of Hula This program captures the journey of legendary master teacher Robert Cazimero and the only all-male hula school in Hawai'i as they prepare to compete at the world's largest hula festival. Beyond deep-rooted stereotypes of "grass-skirt girls," the film tells a story of Hawaiian pride as the men celebrate their 30th anniversary in continuing the revival of men dancing hula. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Calling My Children Gail Farrow, a devoted mother and wife, died when she was just 27. She left behind four young sons, Ronald Jr., Frank, Kenny and Benny, and her husband Ronald. David Binder began photographing Gail and her family in 1987, documenting Gail's last year of life and her family's early adjustment to continuing without her. With insight and honesty, his film and photographs explore the pieces Gail left-photographs, letters, guidance and memories... Twenty years after her death, Gail's hopes for her family collide with the reality of their lives. Calling My Children is a testament of a family's life and a mother's love. duration 29:08   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#125] Mai's America/Someday Flowers Bloom A spunky Vietnamese teenager named Mai gets the chance of a lifetime -- to study in the United States. She lands in rural Mississippi, a crazy quilt of self-proclaimed rednecks, cliquish teenagers, South Vietnamese exiles and transvestite soulmates. From cosmopolitan Hanoi to the heart of the Deep South, Mai's unforgettable journey offers an outsider's glimpse inside America.
    Someday Flowers Bloom - explores Chiyoko Lewis' life as she copes with the challenges she faces in Japan and in the United States. After meeting a country musician in Kumamoto, Japan, she learns that love can overcome cultural and physical obstacles.
    duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-S
  • 12:30 am
    Brooks - The City of 100 Hellos This documentary is about how immigration changes and challenges a cowboy town. It explores how immigrants, refugees and temporary foreign workers from the local meat packing plant are changing and challenging the western cowboy city of Brooks, Alberta, Canada. It also explores the city's 100 year history as it celebrates its centennial anniversary. duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, May 26, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too