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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, May 25, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 25, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10635] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32123] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Procter and Gamble hands the reins of power back to its former CEO. But are shareholders always better off when CEOs return? And beef prices are soaring just as summer grilling season arrives. NBR will tell you how much more your cookout is going to cost. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2909] Tavis talks with actor-writer-director Ethan Hawke. The multiple Oscar nominee talks about his new release, the highly anticipated Before Midnight - which he also co-wrote. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Saving The Ocean [#109] Cod Comeback? In the rich fishing grounds of New England and Canada, it seemed as if cod would never run out - until they did. Fishing communities from Newfoundland to Massachusetts fell apart. Widespread closures in the 1990s aimed to let the cod recover, but it's been a long wait. Carl Safina goes fishing to find some of the first signs that the famous codfish just might, indeed, be coming back. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:30 am
    Saving The Ocean [#110] Scourge of the Lionfish Lionfish are beautiful, colorful reef fish found throughout the Indian and Pacific oceans - that's the good news. The bad news is they're now found all over the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic coasts of North and South America as well. Alien to those waters, lionfish are the perfect invasive species - aggressive, without predators, prolific breeders and tolerant of a wide range of conditions. Numbering in the millions, they are damaging to native fish species. Diving in the Bahamas to help clear lionfish from reefs, sitting down to a lionfish dinner in the Yucatan and joining a lionfish-only fishing derby in Florida, Carl Safina learns how people are fighting back. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2506H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5247] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2211H] SEX SCANDALS IN POLITICS: Do sex scandals matter anymore? Discussing Anthony Weiner and Mark Sanford's second runs for office.
    POPE FRANCIS AND 'THE CULT OF MONEY': Pope Francis condemns materialism and issues a call for world financial reform.
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: Former Senator Olympia Snowe's next act.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Kim Gandy, President and CEO of National Network to End Domestic Violence; Genevieve Wood, Conservative Commentator for the Heritage Foundation; Rina Shah, Republican Strategist.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#204] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#321H] As the debate over immigration reform continues in Washington DC, NTK offers an inside look at the lives of Latino farm workers. With the continuation of our "Main Street" series, anchor John Larson reports from Salinas, California - home to John Steinbeck and some of the richest farmlands in the world. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3122] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Into Harm's Way The 846 cadets in the West Point Class of 1967 arrived at the United States Military Academy in upstate New York in the early 1960s, during a time of peace and with a commitment to making the military their career. Four years later, the 583 graduates of that class - now commissioned officers in the United States Army - would find themselves embroiled in a strange and unpopular conflict taking place in Southeast Asia. The Class of 1967 would pay a high price in the Vietnam War; 30 of its young men would die in combat while countless others would sustain injuries, both physical and psychological, destined to haunt them for years to come. INTO HARM'S WAY takes an honest and unflinching look at the shadow the Vietnam War continues to cast on this class of West Pointers, while also exploring its unsettled place in the American psyche. Compelling interviews, archival photographs and footage, animated sequences and contemporary clips chronicle the men's experiences - from their challenging first year as plebes to the fierce hand-to-hand jungle combat to their post-Vietnam lives. A collection of West Pointers poignantly share, sometimes with great emotion, their first-hand stories about the carnage of war, the war's impact on their lives and beliefs, and their enduring bonds of brotherhood. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#521] Is America's Current Oil Boom Real The US is embarking on the road to energy independence - but is the current Texas oil boom for real? At the same time, a group in South Africa is trying to move the country away from fossil fuel consumption. "Transition Towns" promote sustainable and self-sufficient energy consumption. The details:
    TEXAS - THE NEW OIL BOOM - Soon the US will swimming in oil - at least, that's the way it looks to some people. More than 100 years after the first oil boom in Texas, people are pinning their hopes on the Eagle Ford Shale formation in the southern part of the state. The site yields more than $100 million worth of oil every month. Some experts warn that production can't continue at these levels over the long term. But even if production does decline, the International Energy Agency predicts that the US may well become energy-independent by 2035.
    GLOBAL LIVING ROOM: VIETNAM - Nguyen Tuan Bao and his wife Khanh have lived in the same building for 40 years. Their eldest son lives above them and their youngest in the ground floor apartment. Nguyen Tuan Bao, who works as a tourist guide, is especially proud of the time he spent studying in the former East Germany.
    SOUTH AFRICA - A TOWN IN TRANSITION - South Africa's economic growth is powered by fossil fuels. Electricity is produced mainly by environmentally unfriendly, coal-fired power plants. But some people are trying to change that. In the hamlet of Greyton, about 150 kilometers northeast of Cape Town, 100 activists have joined forces to make their town more sustainable and energy-independent, by turning it into a Transition Town. They want to revamp the entire local infrastructure, increase the use of solar power, and promote the use of regional products. They're also trying to educate local young people about the importance of protecting the environment.
    ORGANIC COSMETICS AND FAIR WAGES - Filipino Social Entrepreneur Anna Meloto's company, Human Nature, aims to fight poverty in the Philippines while producing cosmetics sustainably. More than 90% of the country's population live on the equivalent of less than 2 euros a day. Prices are rising - particularly for basic foods such as rice. Meloto's company pays fair prices for the raw materials it uses to produce its cosmetics - and provides an important source of income for many farmers.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#143] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2506H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5247H] In a major address on Thursday, the president unveiled new guidelines for combating terrorism and the administration's use of drones in that fight. This came on the heels of the new disclosure that 4 Americans had been killed in drone strikes since 2009. He also renewed his call to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times tells us what the president's new strategy means.
    * Meanwhile, controversies continued to swirl throughout Washington this week, particularly around the IRS and its extra scrutiny of conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status. Are the questions about "who-knew-what-when" eroding Americans' trust in government? Dan Balz of the Washington Post has perspective and analysis of the impact on President Obama's standing.
    * The devastating tornado in Oklahoma again put the issue of federal disaster relief front and center this week. Charles Babington of the Associated Press looks at how - in the wake of recent natural disasters - the issue of paying for disaster relief has become a political hot potato.
    * The Senate Judiciary Committee has passed and sent to the full Senate a comprehensive immigration reform bill that's sure to stir up controversy on Capitol Hill. Fawn Johnson of National Journal has the latest on the reform push and the next steps for both the Senate and the House.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Church Divided, A May 24, 2013 This documentary takes viewers to the United Methodist Church's convention in Tampa, FL, where delegates from around the world gather to decide the future of the church and its official policy on gays and lesbians. Progressive Methodists want to amend church doctrine by removing the sentence that identifies the practice of homosexuality as incompatible with Christian teaching, while conservative evangelical Methodists want to retain the church's traditional stance. Who will prevail? duration 27:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17144Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2211H] SEX SCANDALS IN POLITICS: Do sex scandals matter anymore? Discussing Anthony Weiner and Mark Sanford's second runs for office.
    POPE FRANCIS AND 'THE CULT OF MONEY': Pope Francis condemns materialism and issues a call for world financial reform.
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: Former Senator Olympia Snowe's next act.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Kim Gandy, President and CEO of National Network to End Domestic Violence; Genevieve Wood, Conservative Commentator for the Heritage Foundation; Rina Shah, Republican Strategist.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3122] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#321H] As the debate over immigration reform continues in Washington DC, NTK offers an inside look at the lives of Latino farm workers. With the continuation of our "Main Street" series, anchor John Larson reports from Salinas, California - home to John Steinbeck and some of the richest farmlands in the world. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#220H] Going to Jail for Justice * In December 2008, during the closing weeks of the Bush White House, 27-year-old environmental activist Tim DeChristopher went to protest the auction of gas and oil drilling rights to more than 150,000 acres of publicly-owned Utah wilderness. But instead of yelling slogans or waving a sign, DeChristopher disrupted the proceedings by starting to bid. Given an auction paddle designating him "Bidder 70", DeChristopher won a dozen land leases worth nearly $2 million. He was arrested for criminal fraud, found guilty, and sentenced to two years in federal prison - even though the new Obama Administration had since declared the oil and gas auction null and void.
    This week, DeChristopher - who was released less than a month ago - joins Bill to talk about the necessity of civil disobedience in the fight for justice, how his jury was ordered to place the strict letter of the law over moral conscience, and the future of the environmental movement. Bidder 70, a new documentary chronicling DeChristopher's legal battle and activism, opened May 17. DeChristopher is co-founder of the grassroots environmental group Peaceful Uprising.
    * Also on the show, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Gretchen Morgenson tells Bill that, 5 years after the country's economic near-collapse, banks are still too big to fail, too big to manage, and too big to trust. Stockholders' reaffirmation of Jamie Dimon as JP Morgan Chase's chairman and CEO this week - despite a year of accusations and investigations at the bank - is further evidence, she says, of an unchecked system that continues to covet profits and eschew accountability, putting our economy and democracy at risk. Morgenson also discusses how behemoth companies like Apple manipulate the system and avail themselves of the biggest tax loopholes money and influence can buy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#207] Nature-Deficit Disorder/ Ugo Conti's Spider Boat Learn about local efforts to get kids to play outdoors and discover Proteus, a spider-like sea craft that could change ocean travel. duration 25:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#222] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Mr. Cao Goes to Washington What happens when the naivete of a political rookie clashes with the realities of racial and partisan politics of the South? This film is a character study of Congressman Joseph Cao, a Vietnamese American Republican elected by surprise in an African American Democratic district in New Orleans. Will Cao make it through his term with his idealism intact? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Ninoy Aquino and the Rise of People Power Benigno S. "Ninoy" Aquino II was the boy wonder of Philippine politics until the object of his criticism, Ferdinand Marcos, threw him into prison. There Aquino became a deeply reflective and spiritual person who changed the course of history. Where Gandhi used non-violence to drive out the colonizer, and Dr. King used it to fight for civil rights, Aquino adapted nonviolence to overthrowing national dictatorships. The Philippine uprising in the wake of his 1983 assassination began a global wave of pro-democracy movements that continue today. duration 56:44   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1222H] Bhutto As the first Muslim woman to lead an Islamic nation, former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto evolved from a pampered princess to a polarizing politician in one of the most dangerous countries on Earth. Accused of rampant corruption, imprisoned, then exiled abroad, Bhutto was called back to Pakistan in 2007 as her country's best hope for democracy. Struck down by assassins, her untimely death sent shock waves throughout the world. duration 1:54:45   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3122] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5247H] In a major address on Thursday, the president unveiled new guidelines for combating terrorism and the administration's use of drones in that fight. This came on the heels of the new disclosure that 4 Americans had been killed in drone strikes since 2009. He also renewed his call to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times tells us what the president's new strategy means.
    * Meanwhile, controversies continued to swirl throughout Washington this week, particularly around the IRS and its extra scrutiny of conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status. Are the questions about "who-knew-what-when" eroding Americans' trust in government? Dan Balz of the Washington Post has perspective and analysis of the impact on President Obama's standing.
    * The devastating tornado in Oklahoma again put the issue of federal disaster relief front and center this week. Charles Babington of the Associated Press looks at how - in the wake of recent natural disasters - the issue of paying for disaster relief has become a political hot potato.
    * The Senate Judiciary Committee has passed and sent to the full Senate a comprehensive immigration reform bill that's sure to stir up controversy on Capitol Hill. Fawn Johnson of National Journal has the latest on the reform push and the next steps for both the Senate and the House.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Church Divided, A May 24, 2013 This documentary takes viewers to the United Methodist Church's convention in Tampa, FL, where delegates from around the world gather to decide the future of the church and its official policy on gays and lesbians. Progressive Methodists want to amend church doctrine by removing the sentence that identifies the practice of homosexuality as incompatible with Christian teaching, while conservative evangelical Methodists want to retain the church's traditional stance. Who will prevail? duration 27:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#207] Nature-Deficit Disorder/ Ugo Conti's Spider Boat Learn about local efforts to get kids to play outdoors and discover Proteus, a spider-like sea craft that could change ocean travel. duration 25:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1207] Around The World - Silk Road: Kashgar to Istanbul Holly Morris takes over the journey in Central Asia, where silk was traded for "flying horses" from the fertile Ferghana Valley. Crossing the Jiptik Pass to Osh, she then explores the ancient Kingdom of Samarkand and Bukhara before crossing the stony desert of Turkmenistan to the lost city of Merv. Then it's on to the modern capital of Baku in oil-rich Azerbaijan, her last stop before reaching the caravanserais of Turkey and finally the rich bazaars of Istanbul. duration 57:55   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2806] Elsa's Legacy: The Born Free Story 2010 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Born Free", a book and then a film that forever changed the way we think about wildlife. What has happened to lions since this story? And what has happened to the people featured in the film? What has "Born Free" taught us? duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3907H] Secrets of the Sun It contains 99.9% of all the matter in our solar system and sheds hot plasma at nearly a million miles an hour. The temperature at its core is a staggering 27 million degrees Fahrenheit. It convulses, it blazes, it sings. You know it as the sun. Scientists know it as one of the most amazing physics laboratories in the universe. Now, with the help of new spacecraft and Earth-based telescopes, scientists are seeing the Sun as they never have before and even re-creating what happens at the very center of the Sun in labs here on Earth. Their work will help us understand aspects of the sun that have puzzled scientists for decades. But more critically, it may help us predict and track solar storms that have the power to zap our power grid, shut down telecommunications, and ground global air travel for days, weeks, or even longer. Such storms have happened before-but never in the modern era of satellite communication. Thid episode reveals a bright new dawn in our understanding of our nearest star-one that might help keep our planet from going dark. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#902H] Airmen and the Headhunters This episode investigates the survival story of a crew of airmen shot down over the jungles of Japanese occupied Borneo during Word War II. A US bomber crew, stranded in a snake infested jungle, was rescued by Dayak tribesmen -- a tribe known for taking the heads of their enemies. The Dayaks fed and protected the airmen before leading them to the base of the maverick British special ops officer, Major Tom Harrisson, who was fighting a guerrilla war against the Japanese with a band of Australian Commandoes. In what is the most unlikely survival story of World War II, the Airmen's hopes of escape were left in the hands of the eccentric Major Harrisson who orchestrated their rescue by building a bamboo runway deep in the Borneo interior. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    Into Harm's Way The 846 cadets in the West Point Class of 1967 arrived at the United States Military Academy in upstate New York in the early 1960s, during a time of peace and with a commitment to making the military their career. Four years later, the 583 graduates of that class - now commissioned officers in the United States Army - would find themselves embroiled in a strange and unpopular conflict taking place in Southeast Asia. The Class of 1967 would pay a high price in the Vietnam War; 30 of its young men would die in combat while countless others would sustain injuries, both physical and psychological, destined to haunt them for years to come. INTO HARM'S WAY takes an honest and unflinching look at the shadow the Vietnam War continues to cast on this class of West Pointers, while also exploring its unsettled place in the American psyche. Compelling interviews, archival photographs and footage, animated sequences and contemporary clips chronicle the men's experiences - from their challenging first year as plebes to the fierce hand-to-hand jungle combat to their post-Vietnam lives. A collection of West Pointers poignantly share, sometimes with great emotion, their first-hand stories about the carnage of war, the war's impact on their lives and beliefs, and their enduring bonds of brotherhood. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, May 25, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too