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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, May 11, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 11, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10625] Bangladesh Survivor * ATM Heist * Pakistani Elections * Shields and Gerson * Boston Survivor duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32113] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - The dollar is getting stronger. Who benefits? Who gets hurt? And what does it mean for your wallet? And in tonight's Market Monitor, our guest will name four blue chip stocks that he says will go higher over the next year. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2899] Tavis talks with legendary drummer John Densmore, an original member of the seminal rock band, The Doors. The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer shares the backstory of his book, The Doors Unhinged, which chronicles his fight to defend the band's legacy. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Saving The Ocean [#105H] Swordfish!, Part 2 Story about sustainable harpoon fishing of swordfish focusing on a group of fishermen in Nova Scotia. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 am
    Saving The Ocean [#106H] River of Kings, Part 1 For millennia, the Nisqually Indians relied on Chinook salmon caught in the Nisqually River. Now the river's wild Chinook are extinct, and the tribe runs a hatchery to keep their fishery going. But an unusual coalition of tribal leaders, private partners and government agencies is working to restore the river from top to bottom, from its source in the glaciers of Mount Rainier to the estuary that empties into Puget Sound. Led by the Nisqually tribe, the restoration aims to fill the river once again with abundant, magnificent wild salmon. In the restoration, urban rain gardens filter runoff and augment river flow, new logjams deepen and cool its waters and farms returned to marshland provide new places for young salmon to shelter and grow. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2504H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5245] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2209H] SEXUAL ASSAULT IN THE MILITARY: The number of sexual assaults continues to rise. Would changing who handles these problems solve anything? A current bill in congress proposes that control should be taken away from the commanding officer.
    FROZEN EGGS: Some women are choosing to freeze their eggs until they are ready for children, but critics think it could lead to gene selection.
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: International surrogacy could be the best answer for women who cannot become mothers on their own, but are the surrogates being exploited?
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), National Council of Negro Women Executive Director Dr. Avis Jones DeWeever, Conservative commentator Tara Setmayer, Independent Women's Forum Senior Policy Analyst Hadley Heath.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#203] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#319H] Though it passed quickly from the headlines, a single shooting incident at a small college in western Massachusetts continues to have a profound effect on many people 20 years later. Maria Hinojosa anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3120] TOPICS: Benghazi is Back; U.S. - E.U. Trade Pact. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; David Rennie, The Economist. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Eisenhower's Secret War [#101] From Warrior to President "The Lure of the Presidency," chronicles the movement to draft Eisenhower - then NATO commander in Europe - as the Republican candidate for president in 1952. duration 57:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3118] Unwelcome Species Invading Europe Europe has become home to over 10,000 new animal and plant species. But they're not being welcomed everywhere, because they often endanger the habitat of native species. In northern Germany, for example, the nandu - a huge, flightless bird native to South America - is growing in numbers. The details:
    TURKEY: SOLDIERS BREAK THEIR SILENCE - Violent conduct within the Turkish military was long considered a taboo subject. Soldiers had to appear hardened; they were, after all, doing battle against the Kurdish PKK. But now the military leadership is facing serious accusations. More than 900 Turkish soldiers have committed suicide over the past 10 years. Citing eyewitness accounts, a soldiers' rights group says one reason for the high rate is abuse within the ranks. The organization says over 1,000 soldiers have reported beatings and humiliation. Now a growing number of families of suicide victims are taking the issue to court.
    BRITAIN: SECOND HOMELAND OF THE POLES - Since the European Union's eastward expansion in 2004, Britain has been the primary destination for job-seekers from Poland. In future, however, immigrants from the EU may find it more difficult to settle in the country. British diners are now used to Polish waiters, and many home owners have employed Polish plumbers. But the immigrants are not well-integrated. They live in Polish neighborhoods, attend Polish churches, and eat imported Polish food. It came as little surprise when a recent study showed that Polish is the most widely spoken language in Britain after English.
    ROMANIA: COSTLY EXODUS - During the Cold War the West German government paid for some 230,000 ethnic Germans to be allowed to leave communist Romania. Only now is the scope of those payments coming to light. The government in Bonn transferred millions in hard currency to Romania's notorious secret police, the Securitate. These payments were in addition to the billions agreed with the Ceausescu regime. A former negotiator with the West German government provides an insider's account of the clandestine talks.
    GERMANY: UNWELCOME GUESTS - More and more new plant and animal species are spreading across Europe. Many enter the region via freight shipments or by tourists. Among them are a population of nandus that have settled in northern Germany. More than 10 years ago, six nandus escaped from a private farm. Today their number has grown to 120. The huge, flightless birds have adapted well to northern Germany's environment. But farmers and hunters don't like them. Top of their preferred menu - entire fields of young corn plants.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#519] The Medellin Losing Its Hold On Colombia COLOMBIA: The Medellin Model - An End to the Violence? - Medellin used to be considered the drugs capital of South America. Since a range of cultural and social projects have seen dramatic changes in its more deprived areas, however, the city is now seen as a model for urban transformation. At the same time, the war on criminal gangs is far from over. Rapper and graffiti artist Daniel Quiceno comes from the Comuna 13 neighborhood and used to be in a gang. He tells us how and where he got involved, and about the fears he still in the social work he does with local children. IRAN: Online Shopping in Tehran - Shopping via the Internet is now perfectly normal for many people across the globe. For the citizens of Iran, however, that concept remains part of a wider dream for greater freedom. Opportunities are now gradually emerging, however - such as Iran's first Internet store. 30-year-old Eshan Golabgir founded the country's first online shopping platform, based in Tehran. He dreams of seeing his company evolving into the Iranian equivalent of the established online commerce giants. INDIA: E-Waste Recycling by Hand - Better Conditions for Delhi's Waste Pickers - From household waste to old electronic parts - India's refuse problem has reached alarming proportions. The "rag pickers" of Delhi sift through rubbish dumps with their bare hands in the search for electronic waste that they can resell. The process is harmful both to the individuals involved and the environment. A German-Indian project aims to relieve the situation. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#141] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2504H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5245H] * During House Oversight Committee hearings this week, 3 State Department officials disputed the Obama administration's account of what happened during the attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya last September in which US Ambassador Christopher Stevens and 3 other Americans were killed. Charles Babington of the Associated Press will report on the dramatic testimony by the 3 who are being hailed as whistleblowers by Republicans. Meanwhile Democrats charge the event and deaths are being politicized.
    * Secretary of State John Kerry was involved in a delicate, diplomatic dance with Russia this week as the 2 nations held talks to address the civil war in Syria. Peter Baker of The New York Times will have the latest on the diplomatic push and how the 2 nations differ on the best way to address the crisis and put pressure on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to step down. He'll also have the latest on Kerry's warning to Russia not to sell a missile defense system to Syria following Israel's bombing raids there last weekend designed to stop arms from reaching the Palestinian group Hezbollah.
    * Jeff Zeleny of ABC News will report on renewed attention by Congress this week to address immigration reform and jumpstart tougher gun laws.
    * Plus, Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News will have analysis of a US Census report on the increasingly diverse American electorate and the significance of African-Americans making history in 2012 voting at a higher rate than white Americans.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2429H] May 10, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    OPD CHIEF RESIGNS - The sudden announcement by Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan that he would step down immediately for medical reasons took everyone by surprise. A veteran of the OPD, Jordan has led the force for a turbulent 19 months, taking the reins after Chief Anthony Batts resigned. This latest shake-up leaves city leaders, the police force, and the community all battling the city's rising crime rate, in a state of shock. Assistant Chief Anthony Toribio has been appointed interim chief while a national search begins for Jordan's replacement.
    MALDONADO & PRISON REALIGNMENT - Former Lt. Governor and 2014 GOP gubernatorial candidate Abel Maldonado hopes to get a measure on the November 2014 ballot to end prison realignment. The program took effect in 2012, and shifts low level offenders to city and county supervision to save the state money. Gov. Brown is in the hot seat as a court order mandates a reduction of the prison population by more than 100,000 inmates by the end of this year. Critics say realignment and the early release of prisoners will create a public safety issue. PG&E PENALTY - PG&E faces a potential $2.25 billion fine against PG& E September 9, 2010 gas pipeline explosion in San Bruno that left 8 people dead and an entire neighborhood destroyed. That's the recommendation of the Safety and Enforcement Division of the California Public Utilities Commission. If approved, the fine would be the largest ever by a state regulator. Jack Hagan, head of the Safety and Enforcement Division, has urged that "every penny of it to go toward making PG&E's system safer." PG&E Chairman and CEO Tony Earley calls the proposed fine "excessive" and insists that it would make improving the gas system much more difficult financially.
    Guests: Matthai Kuruvila, San Francisco Chronicle; Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle; and Tom Vacar, KTVU.
    W. KAMAU BELL: ANGER WITH A SMILE - Former Bay Area stand-up comic W. Kamau Bell has made the big time. After being discovered by comedian Chris Rock, Bell is now host of his own show, "Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell. " It returned this week on the FX Channel for seven episodes, before going to a daily schedule in the fall. His long running one-man show "The Bell Curve: Ending Racism in About an Hour" was a local hit. Bell visited San Francisco recently and talked to KQED's Joshua Johnson about how the Bay Area shaped his comedy style and how he manages to bring humor to the subject of race. "As a black person in America, you have to find humor in race. Otherwise you go crazy."
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17130Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2209H] SEXUAL ASSAULT IN THE MILITARY: The number of sexual assaults continues to rise. Would changing who handles these problems solve anything? A current bill in congress proposes that control should be taken away from the commanding officer.
    FROZEN EGGS: Some women are choosing to freeze their eggs until they are ready for children, but critics think it could lead to gene selection.
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: International surrogacy could be the best answer for women who cannot become mothers on their own, but are the surrogates being exploited?
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), National Council of Negro Women Executive Director Dr. Avis Jones DeWeever, Conservative commentator Tara Setmayer, Independent Women's Forum Senior Policy Analyst Hadley Heath.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3120] TOPICS: Benghazi is Back; U.S. - E.U. Trade Pact. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; David Rennie, The Economist. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#319H] Though it passed quickly from the headlines, a single shooting incident at a small college in western Massachusetts continues to have a profound effect on many people 20 years later. Maria Hinojosa anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#218H] How People Power Generates Change With our democracy threatened by plutocrats and the politicians in their pockets more than ever, the antidote to organized money is organized people. It takes time and effort, but across the country, grass roots democracy is growing. Individuals are banding together, organizing toward common goals and demanding change - and often delivering it. On this week's episode, we'll meet three organizers leading the way.
    Marshall Ganz is a social movement legend who dropped out of Harvard to become a volunteer during Mississippi's Freedom Summer of 1964. He then joined forces with Cesar Chavez of the United Farmworkers, protecting workers who picked crops for pennies in California's fields and orchards. Ganz also had a pivotal role organizing students and volunteers for Barack Obama's historic 2008 presidential campaign. Now 70, he's still organizing across the US and the Middle East, and back at Harvard, teaching students from around the world about what it takes to beat Goliath.
    Later on the broadcast, economic equality advocates Rachel LaForest, executive director of Right to the City, and Madeline Janis, co-founder and national policy director of Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, discuss with Bill how social action can change both policy and lives. Janis led the fight for a living wage in Los Angeles; LaForest fights for fair and affordable housing across the country.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#220] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Tea Lands of China This program follows two Americans, Mark Rozell, a retail manager at Verve Coffee Roasters in Santa Cruz, CA and Victoria (Tori) Boyert, owner of Satori Tea Company in San Jose, CA, as they travel to two major tea regions in China to learn about two different types of Chinese tea.
    Longjing tea a.k.a. Dragon well tea (green tea) is grown in Hangzhou City in eastern China while Pu'er tea is grown in the southwest Yunnan Province near the border of Burma (Myanmar), Laos, and Vietnam.
    Mark and Tori learn how to pluck, process, and brew a perfect cup of Longjing tea at tea farms in Hangzhou City. They also get a chance to eat popular dishes made with Longjing tea. During their stay in Hangzhou they visit what is called "heaven on earth", the famous West Lake, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, which encompasses beautiful nature scenes and pagodas along the cityscape. They also make an excursion to a 2000-year-old water town, Wuhzhen (north of Hangzhou). Some call it the "Venice" of China.
    In Yunnan Province, Mark and Tori meet many different minority groups who introduce them to Pu'er tea. They climb 9 feet tall Pu'er tea trees to pluck their leaves, learn how the tea is processed, and drink a cup of the tea with Lahu and Bulang minorities. At a Hani minority village, Tori becomes emotionally moved as she stands in front of tea tree that is almost 900 years old. Mark and Tori also experience Wa minority drum dancing and elephant riding in the jungle.
    duration 58:48   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Global Voices [#304] Vietnam: The Next Generation Meet eight young Vietnamese, some born in the final days of the Vietnam War, others in its aftermath. They are entrepreneurs and street kids, farmers and students, artists and engineers. Together they embody the hopes, dreams and challenges of a new Vietnam. Through their stories, this film takes an in-depth look at modern-day Vietnam, where a marriage of communism and capitalism is providing opportunity unimagined in their parents' time. duration 54:13   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Global Voices [#303] China Blue duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Finding Your Roots [#108H] Sanjay Gupta, Margaret Cho and Martha Stewart The three guests in this episode are all children of first- or second-generation immigrants and share the peculiar burdens of that heritage. In an episode that crisscrosses the planet, from India to Korea to Poland, catch a glimpse of three distinct yet oddly overlapping experiences of families leaving their homes and becoming American. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3120] TOPICS: Benghazi is Back; U.S. - E.U. Trade Pact. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; David Rennie, The Economist. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5245H] * During House Oversight Committee hearings this week, 3 State Department officials disputed the Obama administration's account of what happened during the attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya last September in which US Ambassador Christopher Stevens and 3 other Americans were killed. Charles Babington of the Associated Press will report on the dramatic testimony by the 3 who are being hailed as whistleblowers by Republicans. Meanwhile Democrats charge the event and deaths are being politicized.
    * Secretary of State John Kerry was involved in a delicate, diplomatic dance with Russia this week as the 2 nations held talks to address the civil war in Syria. Peter Baker of The New York Times will have the latest on the diplomatic push and how the 2 nations differ on the best way to address the crisis and put pressure on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to step down. He'll also have the latest on Kerry's warning to Russia not to sell a missile defense system to Syria following Israel's bombing raids there last weekend designed to stop arms from reaching the Palestinian group Hezbollah.
    * Jeff Zeleny of ABC News will report on renewed attention by Congress this week to address immigration reform and jumpstart tougher gun laws.
    * Plus, Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News will have analysis of a US Census report on the increasingly diverse American electorate and the significance of African-Americans making history in 2012 voting at a higher rate than white Americans.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2429H] May 10, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    OPD CHIEF RESIGNS - The sudden announcement by Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan that he would step down immediately for medical reasons took everyone by surprise. A veteran of the OPD, Jordan has led the force for a turbulent 19 months, taking the reins after Chief Anthony Batts resigned. This latest shake-up leaves city leaders, the police force, and the community all battling the city's rising crime rate, in a state of shock. Assistant Chief Anthony Toribio has been appointed interim chief while a national search begins for Jordan's replacement.
    MALDONADO & PRISON REALIGNMENT - Former Lt. Governor and 2014 GOP gubernatorial candidate Abel Maldonado hopes to get a measure on the November 2014 ballot to end prison realignment. The program took effect in 2012, and shifts low level offenders to city and county supervision to save the state money. Gov. Brown is in the hot seat as a court order mandates a reduction of the prison population by more than 100,000 inmates by the end of this year. Critics say realignment and the early release of prisoners will create a public safety issue. PG&E PENALTY - PG&E faces a potential $2.25 billion fine against PG& E September 9, 2010 gas pipeline explosion in San Bruno that left 8 people dead and an entire neighborhood destroyed. That's the recommendation of the Safety and Enforcement Division of the California Public Utilities Commission. If approved, the fine would be the largest ever by a state regulator. Jack Hagan, head of the Safety and Enforcement Division, has urged that "every penny of it to go toward making PG&E's system safer." PG&E Chairman and CEO Tony Earley calls the proposed fine "excessive" and insists that it would make improving the gas system much more difficult financially.
    Guests: Matthai Kuruvila, San Francisco Chronicle; Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle; and Tom Vacar, KTVU.
    W. KAMAU BELL: ANGER WITH A SMILE - Former Bay Area stand-up comic W. Kamau Bell has made the big time. After being discovered by comedian Chris Rock, Bell is now host of his own show, "Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell. " It returned this week on the FX Channel for seven episodes, before going to a daily schedule in the fall. His long running one-man show "The Bell Curve: Ending Racism in About an Hour" was a local hit. Bell visited San Francisco recently and talked to KQED's Joshua Johnson about how the Bay Area shaped his comedy style and how he manages to bring humor to the subject of race. "As a black person in America, you have to find humor in race. Otherwise you go crazy."
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1205] Around The World - Pacific Journeys: Tonga to New Caledonia Zay's island-hopping escapades take him now to the independent Kingdom of Tonga and then on to multi-cultural Fiji, once home to cannibals and Indian plantation workers that were brought to the islands to harvest sugar cane. In Norfolk Island, we learn about its convict past while the hills of New Caledonia make a perfect setting for an island trek to the country's native inhabitants. Zay ends his journey in Noumea, where the Kanak people's culture is celebrated at the Tibijao Cultural Center, an architectural marvel that combines ancient knowledge with modern techniques. duration 56:42   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3012#] The Private Life of Deer From our kitchen windows we spot them, nibbling away at our gardens and shrubs. They wander along our highways, reminders of the wilderness we have paved our way through. From coast to coast some 30 million white-tailed deer make their home in the United States. But once they retreat from our view, where do they go? What secrets do they carry back into the forest, away from our prying eyes? Deer are among the most highly-studied mammals in the world; but does any typical homeowner with deer in the yard know how long a deer can live? When they sleep? How many babies a doe can have each year? Working with scientists, special camera equipment, and deer experts and devotees of every kind, Nature reveals the hidden world of white-tailed deer in a whole new light. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3808H] Venom: Nature's Killer Venom scientists are in a race against time. Inside the bodies of many creatures, evolution has produced extreme toxic cocktails, all designed for one reason: to kill. It took millions of years to perfect these ultimate brews of proteins and peptides and we have only just begun to discover their potential. Now, the race is on to collect and study them before the animals that produce them disappear. But how does venom do its deadly work?
    Nova reveals how venom causes the body to shut down, arteries to bleed uncontrollably and limbs to go black and die. But nature's most destructive and extreme poisons could contain the building blocks for a new generation of advanced drugs that could treat heart attack, stroke, diabetes, obesity and cancer. This episode follows scientists on their expeditions to track down and capture the planet's most deadly creatures, risking life and limb just to tease out milligrams of venom and get it back to the lab. Find out how nature's deadliest cocktails could be medicine's brightest new hope.
    duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1203] Death on the Railroad A classic story involving foul play, cover ups, a murder mystery and a voyage of discovery to understand what happened to a group of Irish men who came to America for a better life but found only misery. In 1832, railroad contractor, Philip Duffy, hired 57 Irish immigrants to lay railroad tracks in West Chester, Pennsylvania. But, less than two months after their arrival, all 57 were dead. Did they all die - as was widely believed - due to a cholera pandemic? Or, were some of them murdered? In 2003, twin brothers discovered a secret file among their grandfather's papers that led them to investigate the deaths of these men and find the location of their final resting place in a valley now known as Duffy's Cut. Using the latest forensic and scientific investigative techniques, DNA, forensic analysis, facial reconstruction and historical detective work in Ireland and the USA, modern detectives and experts will unravel this extraordinary story. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Eisenhower's Secret War [#101] From Warrior to President "The Lure of the Presidency," chronicles the movement to draft Eisenhower - then NATO commander in Europe - as the Republican candidate for president in 1952. duration 57:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, May 11, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

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KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

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KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

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KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

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KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too