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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Sunday, April 28, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, April 28, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Dust Bowl [#101H] The Great Plow Up In the first episode, feel the full force of the worst manmade environmental disaster in America's history as survivors recall the terror of the dust storms, the desperation of hungry families and how they managed to find hope even as the earth and heavens seemed to turn against them. duration 1:55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#208] Middle School Middle School: See how middle school students in America are being prepared for high school. Follow along as students read a fairy tale to learn the concepts of plot and theme. Find out why passing notes is encouraged in a sixth grade class. Learn how some teachers are motivating young learners by tapping into their interests. duration 57:04   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    America Reframed [#104] Push: Madison Vs. Madison Madison Park Vocational, Roxbury, Massachusetts. A dysfunctional but talented high school hoops team tries to hold itself together. Graced with a handful of sharp shooters and savvy ball-handlers, they also struggle, both on and off the court, in a deteriorating public school system and the turbulence of life in the Boston inner city: rival gangs, a chilling murder rate, destructive families, and the struggle to stay in school and on the team.
    Closing in on the end of the season, the team has a shot at a state championship and an undefeated season for the first time in history. At the center of this kettle of hope and chaos is Coach Dennis Wilson, a unique hero for our times. A former semi-professional player, philosophizing history teacher and motor-mouthing disciplinarian, Coach Wilson chants, harasses and cajoles his charges onto the court, asking them: "Whose house is this? Whose game is this? What kinda pride you got?" But is Coach Wilson the MP solution or just getting sucked into the problem? As the team heads into the its final regular season games and tournament showdowns, MP Pride will be sorely tested.
    duration 1:53:50   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Global Voices [#526] Land Rush How do you feed the world? 75% of Mali's population are farmers, but rich, land-hungry nations like China and Saudi Arabia are leasing Mali's land in order to turn large areas into agribusiness farms. Many Malian peasants do not welcome these efforts, seeing them as yet another manifestation of imperialism. As Mali experiences a military coup, the developers are scared off ? but can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms? duration 56:46   STEREO
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#216H] Trading Democracy for "Security" * The violent Boston rampage triggered a local and federal response that, according to journalist Glenn Greenwald, adds a new dimension to troubling questions about government secrecy, overreach, and what we sacrifice in the name of national security. Greenwald joins Bill this week to peel back layers that reveal what the Boston bombings and drone attacks have in common, and how secrecy leads to abuse of government power.
    * Also on the show, political scholars Norman Ornstein and Thomas Mann tell Bill that Congress' failure to make progress on gun control last week - despite support for background checks from 90% of the American public - is symptomatic of a legislative branch reduced to dysfunction, partisan ravings and obstruction. A year ago, the two - who had strong reputations as non-partisan analysts - decided to speak truth to power with their book It's Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism. In it, they argue that congressional gridlock is mostly the fault of the right wing of the Republican Party, which engages in "policy hostage-taking" to extend their political war against the president. What's more, Ornstein and Mann say, the mainstream media and media fact-checkers add to the problem by pretending both parties are equally to blame.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Need To Know [#317H] With the gun control debate raging after the mass school shooting in Newtown, CT, Need to Know examines the history of the Second Amendment and how it shapes the discussion today. Ray Suarez anchors a panel including: George Mason Law School professor Joyce Lee Malcolm, former New York Times foreign correspondent and editor Craig Whitney, and Fordham University history professor Saul Cornell. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#204H] Earth Day Special: Where We've Been, Where We're Headed Explore the birth of the Bay Area's environmental movement a generation ago, then see what gains have been made and what challenges remain. duration 26:47   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1634H] CHILDREN'S MARCH 50TH ANNIVERSARY: In May 1963, hundreds of children - some as young as 6 years old - faced police dogs, fire hoses and arrest, to march against segregation in Birmingham, Alabama. Experts say it was a pivotal moment in the struggle for civil rights. Kim Lawton looks back at the march and its legacy and interviews civil rights leaders and some who marched as children, including University of Maryland, Baltimore County President Freeman Hrabowski, who was then 12 and who describes the personal impact of marching and being put in jail.
    BASEBALL AS A ROAD TO GOD: Baseball has its own relics, prophets and rituals - as does religion - according to John Sexton, president of New York University and author of "Baseball as a Road to God." But beyond surface similarities, Sexton tells Bob Faw, the game's most magnificent moments, its timelessness and its intensity, can bring us to a sense of "the ineffable" - the transcendent.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#944] Great Investors: Charles Royce WT features an exclusive interview with small-company stock pioneer Charles "Chuck" Royce. The Royce Fund's "Great Investor" shares his 40 years of lessons learned in the markets, including what's changed and what still works for long-term investment success. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#213H] Sailing off into the sunset could mean a very expensive retirement and Ric Edelman and his colleagues explain why. Other discussion topics include: who really needs life insurance, whether success is still possible in today's world and how supermodel Kathy Ireland went from skimpy swimsuits to a retail empire. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2502H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3118] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5243H] * The two brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombings were planning a larger-scale attack in Times Square. That's what the surviving brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev has told investigators who questioned him in his Boston hospital room this week. Meanwhile federal authorities are under pressure from Republicans in Congress to answer questions over whether information provided by the Russians about the surviving 19-year-old brother's possible ties to radical Islamists was mishandled or not followed up on appropriately. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the bombing investigation.
    * On Thursday Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel confirmed that US intelligence has strong evidence that Syria has used chemical weapons, specifically, the nerve agent sarin, in its fight against rebel forces. The White House has warned that Syria's use of chemical weapons would be a "red line" for possible intervention. James Kitfield of National Journal will look at the dilemma facing the Obama administration that wants to support Syrian rebels while avoiding a military engagement in the Middle East.
    * This week US Senator Max Baucus of Montana announced that he will not seek re-election next year. Baucus becomes the 6th Senate Democrat to announce his retirement this election cycle. Susan Davis of USA Today will report on why Republicans see the departure of this influential red-state Democrat as an opportunity to take back control of the Senate in 2014.
    * Plus, Dan Balz of The Washington Post will report on the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum and how it reflects the legacy of Mr. Bush's 8 years in office.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2427H] April 26, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    SCHOOL FUNDING DEBATED - Gov. Jerry Brown's proposal to dramatically revamp how public school funding is distributed is encountering resistance. The governor's formula would funnel more resources to school districts with higher numbers of English-learners and students from low-income households. Calling it a "civil rights cause for the children of California," Mr. Brown has promised his opponents "the battle of their lives." But Senate Democrats have a competing plan to peg funding individually to disadvantaged students and schools.
    WEST COAST OIL PIPELINE - As controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline to the Gulf Coast continues, a similar project is receiving little attention but could hit closer to home for California residents. The Trans Mountain pipeline carrying oil from Canada's tar sands to the West Coast is looking to nearly triple its capacity, making it potentially bigger than Keystone. Canadian authorities have the final say over Trans Mountain's plans, but environmentalists say it bears watching.
    STEPPING UP SURVEILLANCE - San Francisco's Chinese New Year parade, its Bay-to-Breakers race and the Gay Pride parade all travel along Market Street. Now, Police Chief Greg Suhr wants to install surveillance monitors along the thoroughfare. The proposal comes in light of the role that security cameras played in the rapid arrest of a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing. Will the move increase safety or infringe upon civil liberties?
    Guests: Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle; David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle; and C. W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    SAN FRANCISCO ETHICS REFORM: INTERVIEW WITH DENNIS HERRERA - A proposal to bring more sunshine into San Francisco's city hall is in the works - in the form of an ethics ordinance introduced by City Attorney Dennis Herrera and Board of Supervisors President David Chiu this week. The legislation broadens the definition of who qualifies as a lobbyist and aims to increase transparency surrounding development and construction projects. Scott Shafer talks with City Attorney Herrera about the proposed law as well as recent inquiries into alleged "patient dumping" by a Nevada hospital.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#216H] Trading Democracy for "Security" * The violent Boston rampage triggered a local and federal response that, according to journalist Glenn Greenwald, adds a new dimension to troubling questions about government secrecy, overreach, and what we sacrifice in the name of national security. Greenwald joins Bill this week to peel back layers that reveal what the Boston bombings and drone attacks have in common, and how secrecy leads to abuse of government power.
    * Also on the show, political scholars Norman Ornstein and Thomas Mann tell Bill that Congress' failure to make progress on gun control last week - despite support for background checks from 90% of the American public - is symptomatic of a legislative branch reduced to dysfunction, partisan ravings and obstruction. A year ago, the two - who had strong reputations as non-partisan analysts - decided to speak truth to power with their book It's Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism. In it, they argue that congressional gridlock is mostly the fault of the right wing of the Republican Party, which engages in "policy hostage-taking" to extend their political war against the president. What's more, Ornstein and Mann say, the mainstream media and media fact-checkers add to the problem by pretending both parties are equally to blame.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2502H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3118] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2207H] The panelists discuss: Women in power; Wadjda, a groundbreaking Saudi film; and the internet, sexual assault and women on campus.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Former Bush Advisor Mercy Viana Schlapp, Feminist Activist Erin Matson, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#139] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#204H] Earth Day Special: Where We've Been, Where We're Headed Explore the birth of the Bay Area's environmental movement a generation ago, then see what gains have been made and what challenges remain. duration 26:47   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#317H] With the gun control debate raging after the mass school shooting in Newtown, CT, Need to Know examines the history of the Second Amendment and how it shapes the discussion today. Ray Suarez anchors a panel including: George Mason Law School professor Joyce Lee Malcolm, former New York Times foreign correspondent and editor Craig Whitney, and Fordham University history professor Saul Cornell. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#216H] Trading Democracy for "Security" * The violent Boston rampage triggered a local and federal response that, according to journalist Glenn Greenwald, adds a new dimension to troubling questions about government secrecy, overreach, and what we sacrifice in the name of national security. Greenwald joins Bill this week to peel back layers that reveal what the Boston bombings and drone attacks have in common, and how secrecy leads to abuse of government power.
    * Also on the show, political scholars Norman Ornstein and Thomas Mann tell Bill that Congress' failure to make progress on gun control last week - despite support for background checks from 90% of the American public - is symptomatic of a legislative branch reduced to dysfunction, partisan ravings and obstruction. A year ago, the two - who had strong reputations as non-partisan analysts - decided to speak truth to power with their book It's Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism. In it, they argue that congressional gridlock is mostly the fault of the right wing of the Republican Party, which engages in "policy hostage-taking" to extend their political war against the president. What's more, Ornstein and Mann say, the mainstream media and media fact-checkers add to the problem by pretending both parties are equally to blame.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5243H] * The two brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombings were planning a larger-scale attack in Times Square. That's what the surviving brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev has told investigators who questioned him in his Boston hospital room this week. Meanwhile federal authorities are under pressure from Republicans in Congress to answer questions over whether information provided by the Russians about the surviving 19-year-old brother's possible ties to radical Islamists was mishandled or not followed up on appropriately. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the bombing investigation.
    * On Thursday Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel confirmed that US intelligence has strong evidence that Syria has used chemical weapons, specifically, the nerve agent sarin, in its fight against rebel forces. The White House has warned that Syria's use of chemical weapons would be a "red line" for possible intervention. James Kitfield of National Journal will look at the dilemma facing the Obama administration that wants to support Syrian rebels while avoiding a military engagement in the Middle East.
    * This week US Senator Max Baucus of Montana announced that he will not seek re-election next year. Baucus becomes the 6th Senate Democrat to announce his retirement this election cycle. Susan Davis of USA Today will report on why Republicans see the departure of this influential red-state Democrat as an opportunity to take back control of the Senate in 2014.
    * Plus, Dan Balz of The Washington Post will report on the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum and how it reflects the legacy of Mr. Bush's 8 years in office.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2502H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3118] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2427H] April 26, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    SCHOOL FUNDING DEBATED - Gov. Jerry Brown's proposal to dramatically revamp how public school funding is distributed is encountering resistance. The governor's formula would funnel more resources to school districts with higher numbers of English-learners and students from low-income households. Calling it a "civil rights cause for the children of California," Mr. Brown has promised his opponents "the battle of their lives." But Senate Democrats have a competing plan to peg funding individually to disadvantaged students and schools.
    WEST COAST OIL PIPELINE - As controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline to the Gulf Coast continues, a similar project is receiving little attention but could hit closer to home for California residents. The Trans Mountain pipeline carrying oil from Canada's tar sands to the West Coast is looking to nearly triple its capacity, making it potentially bigger than Keystone. Canadian authorities have the final say over Trans Mountain's plans, but environmentalists say it bears watching.
    STEPPING UP SURVEILLANCE - San Francisco's Chinese New Year parade, its Bay-to-Breakers race and the Gay Pride parade all travel along Market Street. Now, Police Chief Greg Suhr wants to install surveillance monitors along the thoroughfare. The proposal comes in light of the role that security cameras played in the rapid arrest of a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing. Will the move increase safety or infringe upon civil liberties?
    Guests: Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle; David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle; and C. W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    SAN FRANCISCO ETHICS REFORM: INTERVIEW WITH DENNIS HERRERA - A proposal to bring more sunshine into San Francisco's city hall is in the works - in the form of an ethics ordinance introduced by City Attorney Dennis Herrera and Board of Supervisors President David Chiu this week. The legislation broadens the definition of who qualifies as a lobbyist and aims to increase transparency surrounding development and construction projects. Scott Shafer talks with City Attorney Herrera about the proposed law as well as recent inquiries into alleged "patient dumping" by a Nevada hospital.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#204H] Earth Day Special: Where We've Been, Where We're Headed Explore the birth of the Bay Area's environmental movement a generation ago, then see what gains have been made and what challenges remain. duration 26:47   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#211H] Anthropology of Innovation Technological innovation depends on individuals who can "silo bust" - the term used to describe jumping across boundaries and categories. The Financial Times Editor Gillian Tett leads a distinguished panel in a discussion about the creation of silos within organizations and why a person's ability to "silo bust" may hold the key to innovation. duration 53:13   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#216H] Trading Democracy for "Security" * The violent Boston rampage triggered a local and federal response that, according to journalist Glenn Greenwald, adds a new dimension to troubling questions about government secrecy, overreach, and what we sacrifice in the name of national security. Greenwald joins Bill this week to peel back layers that reveal what the Boston bombings and drone attacks have in common, and how secrecy leads to abuse of government power.
    * Also on the show, political scholars Norman Ornstein and Thomas Mann tell Bill that Congress' failure to make progress on gun control last week - despite support for background checks from 90% of the American public - is symptomatic of a legislative branch reduced to dysfunction, partisan ravings and obstruction. A year ago, the two - who had strong reputations as non-partisan analysts - decided to speak truth to power with their book It's Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism. In it, they argue that congressional gridlock is mostly the fault of the right wing of the Republican Party, which engages in "policy hostage-taking" to extend their political war against the president. What's more, Ornstein and Mann say, the mainstream media and media fact-checkers add to the problem by pretending both parties are equally to blame.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#104] Push: Madison Vs. Madison Madison Park Vocational, Roxbury, Massachusetts. A dysfunctional but talented high school hoops team tries to hold itself together. Graced with a handful of sharp shooters and savvy ball-handlers, they also struggle, both on and off the court, in a deteriorating public school system and the turbulence of life in the Boston inner city: rival gangs, a chilling murder rate, destructive families, and the struggle to stay in school and on the team.
    Closing in on the end of the season, the team has a shot at a state championship and an undefeated season for the first time in history. At the center of this kettle of hope and chaos is Coach Dennis Wilson, a unique hero for our times. A former semi-professional player, philosophizing history teacher and motor-mouthing disciplinarian, Coach Wilson chants, harasses and cajoles his charges onto the court, asking them: "Whose house is this? Whose game is this? What kinda pride you got?" But is Coach Wilson the MP solution or just getting sucked into the problem? As the team heads into the its final regular season games and tournament showdowns, MP Pride will be sorely tested.
    duration 1:53:50   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Pacific Heartbeat [#202] Tonga: The Last Place On Earth Tonga is a peaceful island nation, as distant from modernity as it is physically from the western world. Ethnic Tongans convicted of murder, gang violence and other serious crimes, are being deported from the United States to Tonga. Forced to leave behind spouses, children, and family, these convicts are sent to a homeland many know nothing about. Will they adapt and survive in a community that is wary to have them? And how will the influx of these hardened criminals change Tonga: The Last Place on Earth? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Pacific Heartbeat [#202] Tonga: The Last Place On Earth Tonga is a peaceful island nation, as distant from modernity as it is physically from the western world. Ethnic Tongans convicted of murder, gang violence and other serious crimes, are being deported from the United States to Tonga. Forced to leave behind spouses, children, and family, these convicts are sent to a homeland many know nothing about. Will they adapt and survive in a community that is wary to have them? And how will the influx of these hardened criminals change Tonga: The Last Place on Earth? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, April 28, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too