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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, April 14, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, April 14, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    American Masters [#2008] Carol Burnett: A Woman of Character America, in the 1960s and '70s, was in turmoil -- the civil rights struggle, the war in Vietnam and the sexual revolution defined a nation in conflict. But, at 10:00 PM every Saturday, in dorms and dens, in living rooms and bedrooms across the country, Americans watched "The Carol Burnett Show." For 11 years, this wild performer yelled like Tarzan and won our hearts, often breaking our hearts, with her edgy -- always sympathetic -- characters. The program examines Burnett's career, difficult childhood and the dramatic career that followed her TV variety show. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:30 am
    Return When 13-year-old Fred Sondermann escaped from Nazi Germany in 1939, on the eve of World War II, he never imagined he would return. His homeland held only horrific and traumatizing memories of discrimination, persecution and death. However, an opportunity in 1969 to spend a sabbatical in Germany represented a chance for Dr. Sondermann to make sense of, and peace with, his experiences. This documentary recounts Sondermann's remarkable journey to understanding, as he begins to appreciate the complexities and multiple realities of the time. Adapted from Sondermann's memoirs, it explores the emotions and the conclusions of an American Jew returning to his German homeland after 30 years. In addition to the late Sondermann's compelling first-person narrative, it also features interviews with his son, his widow and his childhood friend. Contemporary video and photography of Dachau Concentration Camp and Sondermann's hometown of Horn are interchanged with archival images and documents, period news footage and the few surviving family photographs. duration 28:48   STEREO TVPG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#206] Technology and Science Technology and Science: Visit classrooms across America where hands on lessons capture students' interest and imagination. See biology, physics and chemistry in action and learn about some innovative ways teachers are using technology in the classroom. duration 57:29   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    America Reframed [#125] Big Enough In this intimate portrait, several dwarfs who appeared in Jan Krawitz and Thomas Ott's 1982 film Little People welcome the camera into their lives once again. Through a prism of "then and now," the characters in the film confront physical and emotional challenges with humor, grace, and sometimes, frustration. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Return When 13-year-old Fred Sondermann escaped from Nazi Germany in 1939, on the eve of World War II, he never imagined he would return. His homeland held only horrific and traumatizing memories of discrimination, persecution and death. However, an opportunity in 1969 to spend a sabbatical in Germany represented a chance for Dr. Sondermann to make sense of, and peace with, his experiences. This documentary recounts Sondermann's remarkable journey to understanding, as he begins to appreciate the complexities and multiple realities of the time. Adapted from Sondermann's memoirs, it explores the emotions and the conclusions of an American Jew returning to his German homeland after 30 years. In addition to the late Sondermann's compelling first-person narrative, it also features interviews with his son, his widow and his childhood friend. Contemporary video and photography of Dachau Concentration Camp and Sondermann's hometown of Horn are interchanged with archival images and documents, period news footage and the few surviving family photographs. duration 28:48   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 am
    Global Voices [#524] Stealing Africa How much profit is fair? Ruschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa. duration 53:35   STEREO
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#214H] Living Outside Tribal Lines * This week's episode begins with a report on striking extremes of wealth and poverty on display in California's Silicon Valley. Facebook, Google, and Apple are minting millionaires while the area's homeless - who've grown 20% in the last 2 years - are living in tent cities at their virtual doorsteps. These are the human faces of economic inequality.
    * Later, Bill is joined by writer Sherman Alexie. Born on a Native American Reservation, Alexie has been navigating the cultural boundaries of American culture in lauded poetry, novels, short stories, screenplays, even stand-up comedy for over two decades. Alexie discusses the challenges of living in different cultures at the same time, and shares his irreverent perspective on contemporary American life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Need To Know [#315H] Main Street, Findlay, Ohio John Larson travels to Ohio to assess how workers are faring after the loss of millions of manufacturing jobs over the past 35 years. Findlay - a town in northeastern Ohio with a population of just over 40,000 - is bucking a trend: the town is now gaining factory jobs after years of losing them. What are these new manufacturing jobs? And what will these new opportunities mean for wages, unions, new workers and the middle class? This week's report is the fourth in our series "Main Street" series. Maria Hinojosa anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1632H] CHURCHES AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE - Women are overwhelmingly the victims of the widespread phenomenon of domestic violence. It's not frequently talked about in churches but a Chicago priest now visits parishes around the city to deliver a homily to open people's eyes to the problem and he encourages each parish to set up a support system for victims of abuse. He tells reporter Judy Valente that it's hard to measure success because no one knows how many women who need help aren't coming forward and that abusers don't change easily, but must be confronted and held accountable.
    MEDICAL MINISTRY - Dr. Joseph Dutkowski, a devout Catholic, gave up his career as an engineer to become an orthopedic surgeon, specializing in patients - young and old - with afflictions that cripple or deform. Dutkowski tells Bob Faw that he sees the likeness of God in his patients, and that to share their suffering is, to him, a gift.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#942] Great Investors: Ken Heebner This week's WT features legendary portfolio manager Ken Heebner, who is known for his big bets and rapid trading at the CGM funds. He shares his contrarian views on the U.S. economy and stocks, particularly housing and banking, and why he thinks bonds are so dangerous. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#211H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman talks to Chef Geoff Tracy about the reality of owning your own restaurant, explains what entices people to splurge on enormous yachts and quizzes the audience about the most common reason for financial failure. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2452H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3116] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5241H] Just as the cherry blossoms were blooming in Washington DC, there was an unusual outbreak of bipartisanship on Capitol Hill.
    * Nearly four months after the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the Senate voted today to take up debate on tough new gun legislation. The bipartisan bill to expand background checks was proposed by Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Patrick Toomey (R-PA). Earlier in the week, a number of GOP senators had threatened to filibuster any attempt on new gun restrictions. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will have the latest on the highly-charged debate and the outlook for passage given Republican control of the House.
    *On Wednesday President Obama unveiled a $3.8 trillion budget blueprint that aims to reduce the deficit, raise taxes on the wealthy, and trim entitlement programs, including Social Security and Medicare. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will have analysis of the president's first budget of his second term that has rankled Republicans and some among his own Democratic base.
    * On the same day the president released his budget, he hosted a White House dinner for a dozen Senate Republicans to discuss the economy as well as guns and immigration reform. President Obama is hoping this type of outreach to conservatives will help break through the gridlock and jumpstart his bold, second-term agenda which is sputtering. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News and Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics will take a closer look at the political calculations and how they might play out in the months to come.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2425H] April 12, 2013 Guest Host: Joshua Johnson.
    News Panel topics:
    GOV. BROWN IN CHINA - Gov. Brown, along with nearly 100 business people from California, is on an historic trade mission in China this week. While there, he announced a deal with Chinese investors for a $1.5 billion waterfront development in Oakland, urged Chinese officials to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and touted the virtues of high speed rail while riding a bullet train from Beijing to Shanghai. News10's John Myers is traveling with the governor and reports from Shanghai in the first of a two-part series.
    GUN LEGISLATION - Federal gun control legislation cleared the first hurdle with a 68-31 vote in the Senate. It includes federal background checks and stricter laws on illicit gun trafficking. President Obama and Democrats are pushing for stronger gun curbs in the wake of last year's shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, CT. Legislation is also underway here in California, which already has some of the toughest gun control laws in the country, to ban semi-automatic rifles with detachable magazines and to mandate background checks for ammunition purchases.
    SACRAMENTO KINGS - The potential move of the Sacramento Kings to Seattle has fans and public figures fighting to keep the beloved team in California's capital. Mayor Kevin Johnson, a former NBA All Star, has developed a plan to move the Kings into an updated arena and revitalize the city's downtown area in an attempt to match Seattle's $341 million offer. The NBA's board of governors has the ultimate say in whether the move will take place and is expected to make a decision at its next meeting on April 18th and 19th. Meanwhile, the Maloof family, which owns the Kings, has given Sacramento until 5pm Friday to prove their deal can match Seattle's offer.
    Guests: John Myers, News10; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; and Chuck Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    EXPLORATORIUM OPENS NEW HOME - For over 43 years, San Francisco's Exploratorium has tested the theory that hands-on learning is the best way to teach science. And by all accounts, its model is successful. On April 17, the museum-slash-playground inaugurates a new $300 million, solar-powered building with gorgeous views of the bay and updated exhibits to further entice kids and parents into a love of science.
    While the Exploratorium readies itself for an anticipated 1 million visitors this year, some educators say that big isn't always better. Dan Sudran runs the Mission Science Workshop in San Francisco on a shoestring budget, using mostly materials he gathered himself. He is focused on reaching poor and underserved kids who might never find their way to a big science center like the Exploratorium.
    PBS NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels visits both Sudran's down and dirty workshop and its upscale cousin across town to look at what kind of science education kids need and what works.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#214H] Living Outside Tribal Lines * This week's episode begins with a report on striking extremes of wealth and poverty on display in California's Silicon Valley. Facebook, Google, and Apple are minting millionaires while the area's homeless - who've grown 20% in the last 2 years - are living in tent cities at their virtual doorsteps. These are the human faces of economic inequality.
    * Later, Bill is joined by writer Sherman Alexie. Born on a Native American Reservation, Alexie has been navigating the cultural boundaries of American culture in lauded poetry, novels, short stories, screenplays, even stand-up comedy for over two decades. Alexie discusses the challenges of living in different cultures at the same time, and shares his irreverent perspective on contemporary American life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2452H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3116] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2205H] SEXTREMISM: Radical women protesters have begun a movement called Femen. Their specialty? Protesting topless. Their most recent fight is supposedly for the rights of Muslim women, but Muslim women are saying that Femen does not represent their own beliefs.
    THE IRON WOMAN: The death of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher has brought about both criticism and praise. Was she a role model for women?
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: Female veterans building small businesses.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Women's Campaign Fund President Sam Bennett, Independent Women's Forum Senior Policy Analyst Hadley Heath, Former EEOC Chair Cari Dominguez.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#137] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#315H] Main Street, Findlay, Ohio John Larson travels to Ohio to assess how workers are faring after the loss of millions of manufacturing jobs over the past 35 years. Findlay - a town in northeastern Ohio with a population of just over 40,000 - is bucking a trend: the town is now gaining factory jobs after years of losing them. What are these new manufacturing jobs? And what will these new opportunities mean for wages, unions, new workers and the middle class? This week's report is the fourth in our series "Main Street" series. Maria Hinojosa anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#214H] Living Outside Tribal Lines * This week's episode begins with a report on striking extremes of wealth and poverty on display in California's Silicon Valley. Facebook, Google, and Apple are minting millionaires while the area's homeless - who've grown 20% in the last 2 years - are living in tent cities at their virtual doorsteps. These are the human faces of economic inequality.
    * Later, Bill is joined by writer Sherman Alexie. Born on a Native American Reservation, Alexie has been navigating the cultural boundaries of American culture in lauded poetry, novels, short stories, screenplays, even stand-up comedy for over two decades. Alexie discusses the challenges of living in different cultures at the same time, and shares his irreverent perspective on contemporary American life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5241H] Just as the cherry blossoms were blooming in Washington DC, there was an unusual outbreak of bipartisanship on Capitol Hill.
    * Nearly four months after the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the Senate voted today to take up debate on tough new gun legislation. The bipartisan bill to expand background checks was proposed by Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Patrick Toomey (R-PA). Earlier in the week, a number of GOP senators had threatened to filibuster any attempt on new gun restrictions. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will have the latest on the highly-charged debate and the outlook for passage given Republican control of the House.
    *On Wednesday President Obama unveiled a $3.8 trillion budget blueprint that aims to reduce the deficit, raise taxes on the wealthy, and trim entitlement programs, including Social Security and Medicare. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will have analysis of the president's first budget of his second term that has rankled Republicans and some among his own Democratic base.
    * On the same day the president released his budget, he hosted a White House dinner for a dozen Senate Republicans to discuss the economy as well as guns and immigration reform. President Obama is hoping this type of outreach to conservatives will help break through the gridlock and jumpstart his bold, second-term agenda which is sputtering. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News and Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics will take a closer look at the political calculations and how they might play out in the months to come.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2452H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3116] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2425H] April 12, 2013 Guest Host: Joshua Johnson.
    News Panel topics:
    GOV. BROWN IN CHINA - Gov. Brown, along with nearly 100 business people from California, is on an historic trade mission in China this week. While there, he announced a deal with Chinese investors for a $1.5 billion waterfront development in Oakland, urged Chinese officials to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and touted the virtues of high speed rail while riding a bullet train from Beijing to Shanghai. News10's John Myers is traveling with the governor and reports from Shanghai in the first of a two-part series.
    GUN LEGISLATION - Federal gun control legislation cleared the first hurdle with a 68-31 vote in the Senate. It includes federal background checks and stricter laws on illicit gun trafficking. President Obama and Democrats are pushing for stronger gun curbs in the wake of last year's shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, CT. Legislation is also underway here in California, which already has some of the toughest gun control laws in the country, to ban semi-automatic rifles with detachable magazines and to mandate background checks for ammunition purchases.
    SACRAMENTO KINGS - The potential move of the Sacramento Kings to Seattle has fans and public figures fighting to keep the beloved team in California's capital. Mayor Kevin Johnson, a former NBA All Star, has developed a plan to move the Kings into an updated arena and revitalize the city's downtown area in an attempt to match Seattle's $341 million offer. The NBA's board of governors has the ultimate say in whether the move will take place and is expected to make a decision at its next meeting on April 18th and 19th. Meanwhile, the Maloof family, which owns the Kings, has given Sacramento until 5pm Friday to prove their deal can match Seattle's offer.
    Guests: John Myers, News10; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; and Chuck Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    EXPLORATORIUM OPENS NEW HOME - For over 43 years, San Francisco's Exploratorium has tested the theory that hands-on learning is the best way to teach science. And by all accounts, its model is successful. On April 17, the museum-slash-playground inaugurates a new $300 million, solar-powered building with gorgeous views of the bay and updated exhibits to further entice kids and parents into a love of science.
    While the Exploratorium readies itself for an anticipated 1 million visitors this year, some educators say that big isn't always better. Dan Sudran runs the Mission Science Workshop in San Francisco on a shoestring budget, using mostly materials he gathered himself. He is focused on reaching poor and underserved kids who might never find their way to a big science center like the Exploratorium.
    PBS NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels visits both Sudran's down and dirty workshop and its upscale cousin across town to look at what kind of science education kids need and what works.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#209H] Darpa's Dan Kaufman Meet Dan Kaufman, one of the key players in developing information technology for the U.S. military. As the director of the Information Innovation Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, he has overseen numerous research projects that have had lasting impact on United States's military operations. John Markoff of the New York Times moderates. duration 53:14   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#214H] Living Outside Tribal Lines * This week's episode begins with a report on striking extremes of wealth and poverty on display in California's Silicon Valley. Facebook, Google, and Apple are minting millionaires while the area's homeless - who've grown 20% in the last 2 years - are living in tent cities at their virtual doorsteps. These are the human faces of economic inequality.
    * Later, Bill is joined by writer Sherman Alexie. Born on a Native American Reservation, Alexie has been navigating the cultural boundaries of American culture in lauded poetry, novels, short stories, screenplays, even stand-up comedy for over two decades. Alexie discusses the challenges of living in different cultures at the same time, and shares his irreverent perspective on contemporary American life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1319H] Revenge of the Electric Car In 2006, thousands of new electric cars were purposely destroyed by the same auto companies that built them. Today, fewer than six years later, the electric car is back...with a vengeance. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:30 pm
    America Reframed [#125] Big Enough In this intimate portrait, several dwarfs who appeared in Jan Krawitz and Thomas Ott's 1982 film Little People welcome the camera into their lives once again. Through a prism of "then and now," the characters in the film confront physical and emotional challenges with humor, grace, and sometimes, frustration. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#404] Calypso Rose: The Lioness of the Jungle Calypso Rose, the ambassador of Caribbean music, is a living legend, a charismatic character and the uncontested diva of calypso. Cameras follow Rose from Paris to her native Tobago, then to New York where she lives, and back to her ancestral homeland, Africa. Each place reveals another face and facet of the complex woman behind the public persona. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, April 14, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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