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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, April 13, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, April 13, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10605] John Kerry in Seoul * Venezuelan Election * Tax Reform * The Future of TV * Shields and Brooks * Comedian Jonathan Winters Dead at Age 87 duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32093] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - Two of the nation's biggest banks, JP Morgan and Wells Fargo, reported big profits but investors were not impressed. NBR looks at what the numbers say about next week's bank earnings. And we'll introduce you to a start-up that's helping other start-ups by bringing investors together. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2879] Part 2 of our special 3-night broadcast: Latino Nation: Beyond The Numbers - a national conversation with community leaders about critical issues - continues with a diverse group of panelists on the growing role of Latinos in American society, and the challenges and opportunities facing America's 50-million-strong Latino community. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Seeds of Resiliency This program introduces diverse individuals who have survived tragedies and traumas, and overcome mental and physical challenges, and now use their experiences to affect change and help others. Each thrives today because they refused to give up their struggle, even when all hope seemed lost. These compelling, uplifting and inspirational portraits attest to the strength of the human spirit and the power of positive thinking and action. Profiles include: a professional wheelchair athlete, Holocaust survivors, a homeless counselor, refugees from war-torn countries and a terminally ill cancer advocate. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2452H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5241] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2205H] SEXTREMISM: Radical women protesters have begun a movement called Femen. Their specialty? Protesting topless. Their most recent fight is supposedly for the rights of Muslim women, but Muslim women are saying that Femen does not represent their own beliefs.
    THE IRON WOMAN: The death of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher has brought about both criticism and praise. Was she a role model for women?
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: Female veterans building small businesses.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Women's Campaign Fund President Sam Bennett, Independent Women's Forum Senior Policy Analyst Hadley Heath, Former EEOC Chair Cari Dominguez.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#201] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#315H] Main Street, Findlay, Ohio John Larson travels to Ohio to assess how workers are faring after the loss of millions of manufacturing jobs over the past 35 years. Findlay - a town in northeastern Ohio with a population of just over 40,000 - is bucking a trend: the town is now gaining factory jobs after years of losing them. What are these new manufacturing jobs? And what will these new opportunities mean for wages, unions, new workers and the middle class? This week's report is the fourth in our series "Main Street" series. Maria Hinojosa anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3116] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#214H] Living Outside Tribal Lines * This week's episode begins with a report on striking extremes of wealth and poverty on display in California's Silicon Valley. Facebook, Google, and Apple are minting millionaires while the area's homeless - who've grown 20% in the last 2 years - are living in tent cities at their virtual doorsteps. These are the human faces of economic inequality.
    * Later, Bill is joined by writer Sherman Alexie. Born on a Native American Reservation, Alexie has been navigating the cultural boundaries of American culture in lauded poetry, novels, short stories, screenplays, even stand-up comedy for over two decades. Alexie discusses the challenges of living in different cultures at the same time, and shares his irreverent perspective on contemporary American life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3114] duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#515] China's Toxic Fog People in China are growing increasingly dissatisfied. They're unhappy about corruption, abuse of power and land seizures. But pollution is an especially hot-button issue, driving many people to take to the streets in protest. The details:
    DYING FORESTS: THE HIGH COST OF PARAGUAY'S ECONOMIC UPSWING - Alberto Yanosky is the head of the NGO Guyra Paraguay. Since 1997, the environmental organization has led the struggle to protect the country's natural habitats and their inhabitants. Yanosky is trying to prevent the deforestation of the rain forest in Paraguay. The environmentalist estimates that some 1,000 hectares of forest are cut down each day to make way for cattle ranches and soybean fields. Yanosky tries to step in when land deals are being made in order to save at least some of the trees.
    CLEARING THE AIR: CHINA'S TOXIC FOG - Smog affects thirteen percent of China, an area four times the size of Germany. The air pollution is caused by the growing number of cars on the roads as well as the country's extensive use of coal. The world's second-largest economy uses nearly as much coal as the rest of the world combined. Seven of the ten cities with the worst air pollution are in China. Now the country's population is starting to protest and to call for radical measures to reduce pollutants. Suddenly, environmental protection has become an important topic in China.
    A NATION AWAKES: INDIA'S "RED BRIGADES" COMBAT VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN - For woman in many parts of India, the threat of sexual assaults and violence have made them afraid to be in public alone. In Lucknow, the capital of the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, women are fighting for their rights and safety. Some 24,000 rapes were reported in India in 2011, but activists believe the real number is much higher. India's politicians are slow to respond, despite promises of new legislation ensuring women's rights. Across the country, increasing numbers of groups are protesting against the mistreatment of women and girls by men - and by the Indian government.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#137] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2452H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5241H] Just as the cherry blossoms were blooming in Washington DC, there was an unusual outbreak of bipartisanship on Capitol Hill.
    * Nearly four months after the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the Senate voted today to take up debate on tough new gun legislation. The bipartisan bill to expand background checks was proposed by Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Patrick Toomey (R-PA). Earlier in the week, a number of GOP senators had threatened to filibuster any attempt on new gun restrictions. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will have the latest on the highly-charged debate and the outlook for passage given Republican control of the House.
    *On Wednesday President Obama unveiled a $3.8 trillion budget blueprint that aims to reduce the deficit, raise taxes on the wealthy, and trim entitlement programs, including Social Security and Medicare. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will have analysis of the president's first budget of his second term that has rankled Republicans and some among his own Democratic base.
    * On the same day the president released his budget, he hosted a White House dinner for a dozen Senate Republicans to discuss the economy as well as guns and immigration reform. President Obama is hoping this type of outreach to conservatives will help break through the gridlock and jumpstart his bold, second-term agenda which is sputtering. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News and Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics will take a closer look at the political calculations and how they might play out in the months to come.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2425H] April 12, 2013 Guest Host: Joshua Johnson.
    News Panel topics:
    GOV. BROWN IN CHINA - Gov. Brown, along with nearly 100 business people from California, is on an historic trade mission in China this week. While there, he announced a deal with Chinese investors for a $1.5 billion waterfront development in Oakland, urged Chinese officials to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and touted the virtues of high speed rail while riding a bullet train from Beijing to Shanghai. News10's John Myers is traveling with the governor and reports from Shanghai in the first of a two-part series.
    GUN LEGISLATION - Federal gun control legislation cleared the first hurdle with a 68-31 vote in the Senate. It includes federal background checks and stricter laws on illicit gun trafficking. President Obama and Democrats are pushing for stronger gun curbs in the wake of last year's shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, CT. Legislation is also underway here in California, which already has some of the toughest gun control laws in the country, to ban semi-automatic rifles with detachable magazines and to mandate background checks for ammunition purchases.
    SACRAMENTO KINGS - The potential move of the Sacramento Kings to Seattle has fans and public figures fighting to keep the beloved team in California's capital. Mayor Kevin Johnson, a former NBA All Star, has developed a plan to move the Kings into an updated arena and revitalize the city's downtown area in an attempt to match Seattle's $341 million offer. The NBA's board of governors has the ultimate say in whether the move will take place and is expected to make a decision at its next meeting on April 18th and 19th. Meanwhile, the Maloof family, which owns the Kings, has given Sacramento until 5pm Friday to prove their deal can match Seattle's offer.
    Guests: John Myers, News10; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; and Chuck Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    EXPLORATORIUM OPENS NEW HOME - For over 43 years, San Francisco's Exploratorium has tested the theory that hands-on learning is the best way to teach science. And by all accounts, its model is successful. On April 17, the museum-slash-playground inaugurates a new $300 million, solar-powered building with gorgeous views of the bay and updated exhibits to further entice kids and parents into a love of science.
    While the Exploratorium readies itself for an anticipated 1 million visitors this year, some educators say that big isn't always better. Dan Sudran runs the Mission Science Workshop in San Francisco on a shoestring budget, using mostly materials he gathered himself. He is focused on reaching poor and underserved kids who might never find their way to a big science center like the Exploratorium.
    PBS NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels visits both Sudran's down and dirty workshop and its upscale cousin across town to look at what kind of science education kids need and what works.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17102Z] duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2205H] SEXTREMISM: Radical women protesters have begun a movement called Femen. Their specialty? Protesting topless. Their most recent fight is supposedly for the rights of Muslim women, but Muslim women are saying that Femen does not represent their own beliefs.
    THE IRON WOMAN: The death of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher has brought about both criticism and praise. Was she a role model for women?
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: Female veterans building small businesses.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Women's Campaign Fund President Sam Bennett, Independent Women's Forum Senior Policy Analyst Hadley Heath, Former EEOC Chair Cari Dominguez.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3116] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#315H] Main Street, Findlay, Ohio John Larson travels to Ohio to assess how workers are faring after the loss of millions of manufacturing jobs over the past 35 years. Findlay - a town in northeastern Ohio with a population of just over 40,000 - is bucking a trend: the town is now gaining factory jobs after years of losing them. What are these new manufacturing jobs? And what will these new opportunities mean for wages, unions, new workers and the middle class? This week's report is the fourth in our series "Main Street" series. Maria Hinojosa anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#214H] Living Outside Tribal Lines * This week's episode begins with a report on striking extremes of wealth and poverty on display in California's Silicon Valley. Facebook, Google, and Apple are minting millionaires while the area's homeless - who've grown 20% in the last 2 years - are living in tent cities at their virtual doorsteps. These are the human faces of economic inequality.
    * Later, Bill is joined by writer Sherman Alexie. Born on a Native American Reservation, Alexie has been navigating the cultural boundaries of American culture in lauded poetry, novels, short stories, screenplays, even stand-up comedy for over two decades. Alexie discusses the challenges of living in different cultures at the same time, and shares his irreverent perspective on contemporary American life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#216] duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Greenest Building Over the next 20 years, one third of our nation's existing building stock (over 82 billion square feet) will be demolished in order to replace seemingly inefficient buildings with energy efficient "green" buildings. Is demolition on this scale really the best use of natural, social, and economic resources? Or, like urban renewal programs of the 1960's, is it part of a well-intentioned planning strategy with devastating environmental and cultural consequences?" This program provides a compelling argument for conservation, rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of our existing building stock as the single most effective strategy for reducing, reusing and recycling one of our most important consumer products - our buildings. duration 56:03   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Five Rivers Five Voices Across a vast landscape, rivers cut to the very heart of life in the American West. Some are wild, some harnessed by man. Some inspire and renew us, others stand as boundaries and battlegrounds. Meet remarkable individuals who define their lives through five remarkable rivers. In his latest film, Five Rivers Five Voices, John Howe tells the story of five great American rivers and the evocative voices that define them. duration 56:40   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time This 2012 Emmy-Award winner is the first HD documentary made about the famed father of conservationism, Aldo Leopold. Emmy-Award winning narrator Peter Coyote lends his talent as the voice of Aldo Leopold, and the film's on-screen guide is Curt Meine, Leopold's biographer. It explores Aldo Leopold's life in the early part of the twentieth century and the many ways his land ethic idea continues to be applied all over the world today. It also celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Weeks Act, the law that lead to the creation of many of our eastern national forests, and sparked the long-term effort to replant and restore forests that still continues today. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    POV [#2503H] The City Dark Is darkness becoming extinct? When filmmaker Ian Cheney moves from rural Maine to New York City and discovers streets awash in light and skies devoid of stars, he embarks on a journey to America's brightest and darkest corners, asking astronomers, cancer researchers and ecologists what is lost in the glare of city lights. Blending a humorous, searching narrative with poetic footage of the night sky, "The City Dark" provides a fascinating introduction to the science of the dark and an exploration of our relationship to the stars. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3116] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5241H] Just as the cherry blossoms were blooming in Washington DC, there was an unusual outbreak of bipartisanship on Capitol Hill.
    * Nearly four months after the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the Senate voted today to take up debate on tough new gun legislation. The bipartisan bill to expand background checks was proposed by Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Patrick Toomey (R-PA). Earlier in the week, a number of GOP senators had threatened to filibuster any attempt on new gun restrictions. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will have the latest on the highly-charged debate and the outlook for passage given Republican control of the House.
    *On Wednesday President Obama unveiled a $3.8 trillion budget blueprint that aims to reduce the deficit, raise taxes on the wealthy, and trim entitlement programs, including Social Security and Medicare. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will have analysis of the president's first budget of his second term that has rankled Republicans and some among his own Democratic base.
    * On the same day the president released his budget, he hosted a White House dinner for a dozen Senate Republicans to discuss the economy as well as guns and immigration reform. President Obama is hoping this type of outreach to conservatives will help break through the gridlock and jumpstart his bold, second-term agenda which is sputtering. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News and Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics will take a closer look at the political calculations and how they might play out in the months to come.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2425H] April 12, 2013 Guest Host: Joshua Johnson.
    News Panel topics:
    GOV. BROWN IN CHINA - Gov. Brown, along with nearly 100 business people from California, is on an historic trade mission in China this week. While there, he announced a deal with Chinese investors for a $1.5 billion waterfront development in Oakland, urged Chinese officials to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and touted the virtues of high speed rail while riding a bullet train from Beijing to Shanghai. News10's John Myers is traveling with the governor and reports from Shanghai in the first of a two-part series.
    GUN LEGISLATION - Federal gun control legislation cleared the first hurdle with a 68-31 vote in the Senate. It includes federal background checks and stricter laws on illicit gun trafficking. President Obama and Democrats are pushing for stronger gun curbs in the wake of last year's shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, CT. Legislation is also underway here in California, which already has some of the toughest gun control laws in the country, to ban semi-automatic rifles with detachable magazines and to mandate background checks for ammunition purchases.
    SACRAMENTO KINGS - The potential move of the Sacramento Kings to Seattle has fans and public figures fighting to keep the beloved team in California's capital. Mayor Kevin Johnson, a former NBA All Star, has developed a plan to move the Kings into an updated arena and revitalize the city's downtown area in an attempt to match Seattle's $341 million offer. The NBA's board of governors has the ultimate say in whether the move will take place and is expected to make a decision at its next meeting on April 18th and 19th. Meanwhile, the Maloof family, which owns the Kings, has given Sacramento until 5pm Friday to prove their deal can match Seattle's offer.
    Guests: John Myers, News10; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; and Chuck Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    EXPLORATORIUM OPENS NEW HOME - For over 43 years, San Francisco's Exploratorium has tested the theory that hands-on learning is the best way to teach science. And by all accounts, its model is successful. On April 17, the museum-slash-playground inaugurates a new $300 million, solar-powered building with gorgeous views of the bay and updated exhibits to further entice kids and parents into a love of science.
    While the Exploratorium readies itself for an anticipated 1 million visitors this year, some educators say that big isn't always better. Dan Sudran runs the Mission Science Workshop in San Francisco on a shoestring budget, using mostly materials he gathered himself. He is focused on reaching poor and underserved kids who might never find their way to a big science center like the Exploratorium.
    PBS NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels visits both Sudran's down and dirty workshop and its upscale cousin across town to look at what kind of science education kids need and what works.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1201] Around The World: Across America: Route 66 & Beyond Justine Shapiro kicks off the journey with a road trip west across the United States. Starting in Washington, DC she follows the Blue Ridge Parkway to Nashville and Memphis, birthplaces of American country and soul. After a brief countryside respite in Arkansas, Justine hits the legendary Route 66 from Oklahoma to Arizona, where she visits the world's best preserved meteor crater. duration 56:05   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Frontline [#3107H] Syria Behind The Lines In the rural heartland of Syria's countryside, the bloody uprising against President Bashar Al Assad has taken a terrifying turn. In this documentary, award-winning filmmaker Olly Lambert lives on both sides of Syria's sectarian frontline, witnessing the devastating effect of a religious feud that, regardless of the outcome of the war, is shaping Syria's future. For generations, the many religions that live in Syria's Orontes River Valley have lived together peacefully. But as the conflict spirals into a contagious and sectarian blood feud, friends and neighbors of different faiths are taking up arms against each other, as Syrian society begins to collapse. And as each side seeks more and more revenge, shells, mortars, and air attacks only escalate the hatred and violence on both sides. duration 56:16   STEREO TV14
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4009H] Australia's First 4 Billion Years: Awakening Of all the continents on Earth, none preserves a more spectacular story of its origins than Australia. Nova's mini-series takes viewers on a rollicking adventure from the birth of the Earth to the emergence of the world we know today. With help from high-energy host and scientist Richard Smith, we meet titanic dinosaurs and giant kangaroos, sea monsters and prehistoric crustaceans, disappearing mountains and deadly asteroids. This is the untold story of the Land Down Under, the one island continent that has got it all. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Truth About Exercise with Michael Mosley, The Whether you're running, swimming, cycling or hula hooping, we have always been told that doing regular exercise will improve our bodies and is one of the keys to a healthy and happy life. Our one-size-fits-all approach to maintaining an active, healthy lifestyle is very rarely questioned, but with recent advances in genetic testing technology and brain stimulation techniques, scientists are uncovering the new and surprising truths about what exercise is really doing to our bodies, and why we all respond to it differently. In this program, Michael Mosley uses himself as a human guinea pig to discover the truth about exercise. duration 56:26   SRND51 TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    American Masters [#2008] Carol Burnett: A Woman of Character America, in the 1960s and '70s, was in turmoil -- the civil rights struggle, the war in Vietnam and the sexual revolution defined a nation in conflict. But, at 10:00 PM every Saturday, in dorms and dens, in living rooms and bedrooms across the country, Americans watched "The Carol Burnett Show." For 11 years, this wild performer yelled like Tarzan and won our hearts, often breaking our hearts, with her edgy -- always sympathetic -- characters. The program examines Burnett's career, difficult childhood and the dramatic career that followed her TV variety show. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG
Saturday, April 13, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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