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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Saturday, April 6, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, April 6, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10600] March Jobs Report * Syria Refugees * New Ruling on Morning-After Bill * Shields and Brooks * Offshore Bank Accounts duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32088] Tonight on Nightly Business Report - the slowest jobs growth in 9 months sends stocks lower. What does it all mean for the economy and the markets? Earnings season kicks off on Monday. NBR looks at how this profit season is shaping up. And, stock picks from our weekly Market Monitor. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2874] Tavis talks with Jonathan Rieder, author of Gospel of Freedom. The noted sociologist and Barnard College professor explains the motivation for his latest text on Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" and the struggle that changed a nation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Hope Givers This program follows "voluntourists" from the Indiana-based Ambassadors for Children to Morocco on their extraordinary mission of mercy. This coalition of caring, ordinary Americans journey to the L'Heure Joyeuse clinic half-a-world away, bringing with them food, formula, medicines, toys, hygiene kits, medical equipment and most importantly, hope. During their one-week trip, the group overcomes culture shock, communication barriers, frustration and outrage while visiting destinations off-limits to the typical tourist, including an orphanage in Marrakech. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2451H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5240] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2204H] Breaking the "Brass Ceiling": Taking a look at the increasing number of women in national security. Princeton Letter: Susan Patton's letter to the editor of The Princetonian, which encouraged women to find husbands while they are in college, caused uproar this week. Leading to the significant question, should women marry young? Behind the Headlines: Going Solo: A new book which takes a look at the highest amount of Americans ever living alone and apparently, they're thriving. Panelists: Rep. Donna Edwards (D-MD), Former Judge and Federal Prosecutor Debra Carnahan, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, Republican Strategist Cheri Jacobus duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#34] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#314H] NTK examines how behavioral economics is being utilized to encourage low-income workers to save. Correspondent William Brangham reports from Vermont how workers who have repaid emergency loans through automatic paycheck deductions continue to take the lower amount in their paychecks and save the difference after the loan is paid off. Correspondent Brian Epstein reports about a plan devised by Mayor Michael Bloomberg that offers incentives to low-wage earners who save their tax refunds. The "American Voices" essay is by Dan Ariely, professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University. Maria Hinojosa anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3115] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#213H] MLK's Dream of Economic Justice * Martin Luther King, Jr., who died 45 years ago this month, had long known that racial equality was inextricably linked to economic equity - fairness for all, including working people and the poor. In the last year of his life, as he moved toward Memphis and assassination, Dr. King announced the Poor People's Campaign to demand an "Economic Bill of Rights" for all Americans, regardless of color. But nearly a half-century later, that dream is still a dream deferred. This week, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch and author and theologian James Cone join Bill to discuss Dr. King's vision of economic justice, and why so little has changed for America's most oppressed.
    * Also on the show, poet Kyle Dargan, whose poetry provides a window into the humanity that Branch & Cone say is essential to get people working towards justice, visits Bill to talk about and read from his work.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3113] Women Living As Men - An Ancient Albanian Custom They carry guns and engage in some of the most physically demanding jobs around. An outsider would hardly recognize them as women - but biologically they are. Known as sworn virgins, these Albanian women live as men, following a centuries-old Balkan tradition. The details:
    ROMANIA: THE OLD COAL PITS - The picturesque Jiu Valley in southwestern Romania is experiencing a social and economic crisis. As the mine pits shut down, unemployment is growing - but there's little help from the state. During the Ceausescu era, tens of thousands were employed in the Jiu mines. Most were unskilled workers from other parts of the country. The turn of the millennium saw the first pit closures and massive protests of miners in Bucharest. Today the miners have given up protesting and are left living in dire poverty. Some even dig for coal to heat their homes for their families.
    ALBANIA: THE WOMEN WHO LIVE AS MEN - It's an unusual tradition in Albania, and today it's dying out: the tradition of the sworn virgin. They are women who choose to live as men to escape the restrictions imposed on women in their patriarchal society. They call themselves burrnesha, and have sworn a vow of chastity. Most of them made the decision during puberty to switch gender roles and live as men, though physically they remain female. The tradition of the "man-woman" has its origins in an ancient code of honor common in Albania whereby families without a male successor could choose a girl to fill the role of patriarch instead.
    BRITAIN: HAPPY HENS - The Hen Welfare Trust is a national charity in Britain that believes all hens should live in free-range settings. The charity has already rescued more than 300,000 hens from the misery of battery cages. Trust members regularly rescue commercial egg-laying hens from slaughter and find them new homes with private households. Often the birds are scrawny and have been classified as "unproductive" because the strain of life in the battery farm has left them unable to lay many eggs. But in private gardens, the hens often recover and thrive.
    SPAIN: SAVIOR OF THE HOMELESS - The debt crisis and forced evictions have left many people in Spain without a place to live. It's estimated that 100,000 Spaniards are homeless. Many of them rely on help from their community. One of them is Gloria Iglesias, who has been opening her home to homeless people for 13 years now. Motivated by her religious belief, Gloria has helped more than 160 people over the years. But her project also depends on the charity of others - like the owners of a nearby grocery stall who give food donations, and property owners who let her use space for her project's workshop.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#514] Plastic Bottles Go Sola What is happiness? That's a question philosophers have spent centuries trying to answer. On March 20th, the United Nations will celebrate the first ever International Day of Happiness. That got us thinking here at Global 3000, and we set out on our own quest to find the secret behind true happiness. The details:
    SCHOMBERG: WELCOME TO HAPPINESS TOWN, GERMANY - Germany boasts the strongest economy in Europe, and Germans have seen their individual material wealth increase over the past decade. But a recent study by the Cologne Institute for Economic Research shows that satisfaction hasn't risen along with wages and wealth. That's where the town of Schomberg comes in.
    JAPAN: LUCKY CHARMS - Cuteness, or 'kawaii' as it's known in Japanese, is a major aspect of popular culture in Japan. From toys to food and clothing, cute products are part of everyday life. Living mascots are a common sight on the streets of Tokyo, where people dressed as toys or cute cartoons are used to advertise tourist attractions, restaurants and more. Kohei Sato, for example, works for the city administration, but his job is to dress up as a fuzzy pink rabbit, every day.
    PHILIPPINES: PLASTIC BOTTLES GO SOLAR - In the Philippines' urban slums, families are unable to afford electricity and often have no access to the grid anyway. But Filipino actor Illac Diaz is looking to change that. With his organization My Shelter Foundation, he's come up with an innovative idea: turning empty plastic bottles into lamps. The bottles are filled with water and a dash of bleach before they're built into the roofs of slum huts. The organization has already installed around 300,000 of these makeshift lamps across the Philippines.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#136] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2451H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5240H] * While the White House is playing down threats from North Korea that it is preparing to attack the United States, the Pentagon is dispatching US warships to the region and beefing up missile defense systems as precautionary measures. North Korea's hostile rhetoric and saber-rattling are nothing new. But with limited intelligence, there are growing concerns about North Korea's capabilities. David Sanger of The New York Times will report on the escalating tensions and deteriorating situation along the Korean Peninsula and the US response.
    * A robust stock market, improving housing market and rallying car sales are trends that seem to reflect rising confidence in the economy. Job growth has even picked up in recent months, but Labor Department reports show much of the growth has been created by companies filling low-wage, low-skilled jobs. David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will take a closer look at how some inconsistent indicators are projecting mixed signals about the future of the US economic recovery.
    * A bipartisan group of Senators seems to be on the verge of reaching an agreement on an immigration reform bill. But there are a few obstacles that must be resolved first including determining the best path to earned citizenship and an employment verification system. Fawn Johnson of National Journal will have the latest on the negotiations on Capitol Hill and where the House might come down on new immigration legislation.
    * Plus, Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report will have a wrap-up of this week's political stories from South Carolina's Mark Sanford to Hillary Clinton's return to the public stage.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2424H] April 5, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    PRESIDENT OBAMA IN BAY AREA - President Obama visited the Bay Area for the first time since his re-election to raise money for Democratic Party candidates and to gain support for returning Rep. Nancy Pelosi to the position of House Speaker. In San Francisco, the president was met by environmental activists protesting the construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline. Meanwhile in Silicon Valley, newcomer and fellow Democrat Ro Khanna says he will challenge six-term Congressman Mike Honda, going against the wishes of the president. The race is expected to be one of the most heated in the 2014 election.
    BAY BRIDGE TANKER CRASH REPORT - The California Board of Pilot Commissioners has suspended the license of pilot Guy Kleess, who was found responsible for crashing an oil tanker into a western-span tower of the Bay Bridge this past January. Also, following the discovery of faulty steel rods on the new eastern span of the bridge, Caltrans investigators are still assessing what caused them to break and whether other parts produced by the same manufacturer may be at risk of malfunctioning. < br />TESLA MOTORS GEARS UP - Palo Alto-based electric car manufacturer Tesla Motors has unveiled its first financing plan to make their nearly $70,000 Model S more accessible to consumers. With financing from Wells Fargo or US Bank, drivers would only need a 10% down payment. The ten-year old company also announced it is profitable for the first time. The news initially sent stock prices soaring, but Wall Street seems unconvinced that the new loan program will lead to a significant increase in consumer demand.
    Guests: Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle; Tom Vacar, KTVU News; and David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle
    DANNY GLOVER, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER OF THE HOUSE I LIVE IN - Actor and San Francisco native Danny Glover talks about The House I Live In, a new documentary he championed as executive producer. The film takes a critical look at the so-called war on drugs and won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance this year. "It's really not a war on drugs, it's a war on people," Glover explains to KQED's Joshua Johnson.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17095Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2204H] Breaking the "Brass Ceiling": Taking a look at the increasing number of women in national security. Princeton Letter: Susan Patton's letter to the editor of The Princetonian, which encouraged women to find husbands while they are in college, caused uproar this week. Leading to the significant question, should women marry young? Behind the Headlines: Going Solo: A new book which takes a look at the highest amount of Americans ever living alone and apparently, they're thriving. Panelists: Rep. Donna Edwards (D-MD), Former Judge and Federal Prosecutor Debra Carnahan, Red Alert Politics Editor Francesca Chambers, Republican Strategist Cheri Jacobus duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3115] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#314H] NTK examines how behavioral economics is being utilized to encourage low-income workers to save. Correspondent William Brangham reports from Vermont how workers who have repaid emergency loans through automatic paycheck deductions continue to take the lower amount in their paychecks and save the difference after the loan is paid off. Correspondent Brian Epstein reports about a plan devised by Mayor Michael Bloomberg that offers incentives to low-wage earners who save their tax refunds. The "American Voices" essay is by Dan Ariely, professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University. Maria Hinojosa anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#213H] MLK's Dream of Economic Justice * Martin Luther King, Jr., who died 45 years ago this month, had long known that racial equality was inextricably linked to economic equity - fairness for all, including working people and the poor. In the last year of his life, as he moved toward Memphis and assassination, Dr. King announced the Poor People's Campaign to demand an "Economic Bill of Rights" for all Americans, regardless of color. But nearly a half-century later, that dream is still a dream deferred. This week, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch and author and theologian James Cone join Bill to discuss Dr. King's vision of economic justice, and why so little has changed for America's most oppressed.
    * Also on the show, poet Kyle Dargan, whose poetry provides a window into the humanity that Branch & Cone say is essential to get people working towards justice, visits Bill to talk about and read from his work.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#512H] Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct, Night Sky Discover how a multi-billion dollar engineering project is earthquake-proofing the water supply for millions of Bay Area residents. QUEST visits a research facility in North Carolina where scientists are preserving the history of astronomical photography, one plate at a time. And learn why Nebraska photographer Mike Forsberg travelled across the Great Plains to portray the wild species and habitats of "flyover country." duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#215] duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Kalb Report [#602] The Twilight of Network News: A Conversation with Ted Koppel on Democracy and the Press duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 pm
    American Values: American Wilderness From the Arctic to the Everglades, wilderness is a haven for animals, a source of clean water and air and a challenging place which can inspire profound personal growth. Hosted by the late Christopher Reeve, this documentary introduces a wide variety of citizens who share a deep love of nature - from their early childhood experiences to their expressions of hope for the future. It was filmed during the 40th-anniversary celebration of The Wilderness Act and marks one of Reeve's last on-screen appearances. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Burning The Future: Coal In America This program examines the explosive conflict between the coal industry and residents of West Virginia. Confronted by emerging "clean coal" energy policies, local activists watch a world blind to the devastation caused by coal's extraction. Faced with toxic ground water and the obliteration of 1.4 million acres of mountains, our heroes launch a valiant fight to arouse the nation's help in protecting their mountains, saving their families, and preserving their way of life. duration 56:28   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Earth: The Operators' Manual Humans need energy. We always have and always will. But if we continue to burn fossil fuels until they're all used up, we'll cook our planet through the inevitable warming effects of carbon dioxide. But we don't have to do that: there are many sustainable energy options. If we look at Earth as if we have an operators' manual, we can create clean energy for a growing population, bring power to the billion and a half who live off the grid, improve the environment and create an age of technological innovation full of new "green" jobs. Hosted by Penn State geologist Richard Alley, and taped on location worldwide (New Zealand, Brazil, China, Morocco and Spain, and all across the United States) the program includes case studies of how and why the US military is reducing its "carbon bootprint," targeting emissions levels and energy efficiencies more ambitious than many nations. The program also looks at wind energy and communities coming back to life in West Texas, and provides hard numbers on how much power we can harvest from other sustainable resources such as solar, geothermal and biomass. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3115] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5240H] * While the White House is playing down threats from North Korea that it is preparing to attack the United States, the Pentagon is dispatching US warships to the region and beefing up missile defense systems as precautionary measures. North Korea's hostile rhetoric and saber-rattling are nothing new. But with limited intelligence, there are growing concerns about North Korea's capabilities. David Sanger of The New York Times will report on the escalating tensions and deteriorating situation along the Korean Peninsula and the US response.
    * A robust stock market, improving housing market and rallying car sales are trends that seem to reflect rising confidence in the economy. Job growth has even picked up in recent months, but Labor Department reports show much of the growth has been created by companies filling low-wage, low-skilled jobs. David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will take a closer look at how some inconsistent indicators are projecting mixed signals about the future of the US economic recovery.
    * A bipartisan group of Senators seems to be on the verge of reaching an agreement on an immigration reform bill. But there are a few obstacles that must be resolved first including determining the best path to earned citizenship and an employment verification system. Fawn Johnson of National Journal will have the latest on the negotiations on Capitol Hill and where the House might come down on new immigration legislation.
    * Plus, Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report will have a wrap-up of this week's political stories from South Carolina's Mark Sanford to Hillary Clinton's return to the public stage.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2424H] April 5, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    PRESIDENT OBAMA IN BAY AREA - President Obama visited the Bay Area for the first time since his re-election to raise money for Democratic Party candidates and to gain support for returning Rep. Nancy Pelosi to the position of House Speaker. In San Francisco, the president was met by environmental activists protesting the construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline. Meanwhile in Silicon Valley, newcomer and fellow Democrat Ro Khanna says he will challenge six-term Congressman Mike Honda, going against the wishes of the president. The race is expected to be one of the most heated in the 2014 election.
    BAY BRIDGE TANKER CRASH REPORT - The California Board of Pilot Commissioners has suspended the license of pilot Guy Kleess, who was found responsible for crashing an oil tanker into a western-span tower of the Bay Bridge this past January. Also, following the discovery of faulty steel rods on the new eastern span of the bridge, Caltrans investigators are still assessing what caused them to break and whether other parts produced by the same manufacturer may be at risk of malfunctioning. < br />TESLA MOTORS GEARS UP - Palo Alto-based electric car manufacturer Tesla Motors has unveiled its first financing plan to make their nearly $70,000 Model S more accessible to consumers. With financing from Wells Fargo or US Bank, drivers would only need a 10% down payment. The ten-year old company also announced it is profitable for the first time. The news initially sent stock prices soaring, but Wall Street seems unconvinced that the new loan program will lead to a significant increase in consumer demand.
    Guests: Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle; Tom Vacar, KTVU News; and David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle
    DANNY GLOVER, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER OF THE HOUSE I LIVE IN - Actor and San Francisco native Danny Glover talks about The House I Live In, a new documentary he championed as executive producer. The film takes a critical look at the so-called war on drugs and won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance this year. "It's really not a war on drugs, it's a war on people," Glover explains to KQED's Joshua Johnson.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#512H] Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct, Night Sky Discover how a multi-billion dollar engineering project is earthquake-proofing the water supply for millions of Bay Area residents. QUEST visits a research facility in North Carolina where scientists are preserving the history of astronomical photography, one plate at a time. And learn why Nebraska photographer Mike Forsberg travelled across the Great Plains to portray the wild species and habitats of "flyover country." duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1105] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Israel & The Palestinian Territories Angela May discovers the diverse and rich food traditions of Israel, with visits to Jaffa, Jerusalem, the coastal city of Acca and the hills of Judea. In the second half of this special, chef Bobby Chinn investigates whether or not there is an authentic Palestinian cuisine as he explores Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethlehem and Ramallah. duration 55:22   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3009] What Plants Talk About Hard core science is effortlessly integrated with a light-hearted look at how plants behave, revealing a world where plants are as busy, responsive and complex as we are. From the stunning heights of the Great Basin Desert to the lush coastal rainforests of Canada's west coast, scientist J.C. Cahill takes us on a journey into the "secret world of plants," revealing an astonishing landscape where plants eavesdrop on each other, talk to their allies, call in insect mercenaries and nurture their young. It is a world of pulsing activity, where plants are a lot less passive and a lot more intelligent than you think! duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4007H] Ancient Computer An unpromising lump of metal found in a 2000-year-old shipwreck turns out to be an extraordinary treasure: the world's first computer. Nova follows the ingenious detective work that painstakingly discovered the truth about the ancient Greek device: it was an astonishingly sophisticated astronomical calculator and eclipse predictor, unrivaled until the era of modern science and believed to be from the workshop of Archimedes. duration 55:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Eat, Fast and Live Longer with Michael Mosley Michael Mosley has set himself a truly ambitious goal: he wants to live longer, stay younger and lose weight. But he wants to make as few changes to his life as possible along the way. And he thinks he's found the answer -- the ancient idea of fasting. Could the powerful new science behind this idea lead to a longer, healthier life? Mosley thinks he's found a way of fasting that still allows him to enjoy his food. It sounds too good to be true. So he decides to take a road trip across the U.S. to investigate how a little hunger can make you younger -- and of course -- to try out some of this new science for himself. duration 56:26   SRND51 TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    Dangerous Edge: A Life of Graham Greene This film is a portrait of a writer Graham Greene. It explores how Greene's life both inspired great writing and drove him to attempt suicide. He was a British spy, a doubting Catholic, and a manic-depressive who wrote critically-acclaimed, best- selling novels, including The Quiet American, Brighton Rock, The End of the Affair and The Third Man. This documentary weaves Greene's novels and movies into the story of his life: the struggle between good and evil... love and betrayal; it reveals an extraordinary man who traveled the globe to escape the boredom of ordinary existence and became a writer addicted to danger. The film is a journey in search of Greene's most elusive character: himself. Sir Derek Jacobi narrates the film and actor Bill Nighy reads from Greene's writing. Other major participants include novelist and screenwriter Sir John Mortimer, novelist and former SIS agent John Le Carre, award-winning literary critic and novelist David Lodge, acclaimed writer Paul Theroux, former CIA operative and author of The Great Game Frederick Hitz, Greene's wife, Vivien, and his daughter Caroline Bourget. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, April 6, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

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KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too