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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, March 16, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, March 16, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10585] Two Years Into Syrian War * Republican Party Conference * Shields and Brooks * Contaminated Drinking Water * JP Morgan Congressional Testimony duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32073] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, with the markets at lofty levels we talk with former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan duration 24:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2859] Tavis talks with actress Elisabeth Moss, co-star of AMC's Emmy-winning series, Man Men. The versatile actress describes her lead role in the BBC and Sundance Channel miniseries, Top of the Lake. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    America Revealed [#103H] Electric Nation Our modern electric power grid has been called the biggest and most complex machine in the world -- delivering electricity to over 300 million Americans over 200,000 miles of high tension transmission lines. But even though the grid touches almost every aspect of our lives, it's a system we know very little about. In this episode, Yul Kwon will travel around the country to understand its intricacies, its vulnerabilities and the remarkable ingenuity required to keep the electricity on every day of the year. duration 54:16   SRND51 TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2448] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5237] duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2149H] Meet The New Congresswomen #2 Meet the New Congresswomen #2
    * Rep. Joyce Beatty (D- 3rd District OH) She is one of two African American women elected from Ohio. Beatty was a Senior Vice-President at Ohio State University and became a leader within her time spent as a democratic member of the Ohio House of Representatives.
    * Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D- 9th District AZ) Prior to being elected to Congress, Sinema served in both chambers of the Arizona legislature. During her tenure in government, Sinema worked on the adoption of the Dream Act and as an advocate for same-sex marriage in Arizona. She is also the first elected openly bisexual congressperson.
    * Rep. Jackie Walorski (R- 2nd District IN) For the first time in the history of Indiana, Walorski became one of the two Republicans voted into Congress. She has also served in the Indiana House of Representatives.
    * Rep. Elizabeth Esty, (D- 5th District CT) With her daughter to thank for her first campaign, Esty has become an important figure in government. Although she lost her seat at one point due to her stance on the death penalty, she has always voted according to her beliefs and won back her seat.
    * Rep. Ann McLane Kuster (D- 2nd District NH) Ann McLane Kuster began politics while following in the footsteps of her father and is now the first woman to represent her district in Congress which additionally makes her part of the matriarchy taking place in New Hampshire government.
    * Rep. Suzan DelBene (D- 1st District WA) DelBene helped to start drugstore.com, spent 12 years at Microsoft, became a senior advisor to Global Partnerships, and served as the Director of the Washington State Department of Revenue.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#131] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#311H] The Family Planning Fight Continues In the two weeks since the sequester began and the effects are already being felt. One of the federal programs being cut is funding of family planning clinics - those serving primarily low-income and uninsured individuals. With $15 million in cuts slated to happen over the next year, things such as cancer screenings, testing for sexually transmitted infections, and reproductive health care services might suddenly be unavailable to more than 100,000 primarily low-income women across the country.
    Texas has already been down this road. In 2011, the state legislature slashed the budget for family planning services by $73 million dollars for 2012 and 2013. The result? More than 50 family planning clinics across the state closed. NTK's Mona Iskander traveled there last summer and filed this report.
    Anchor Scott Simon interviews Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, who looks at what's happening to these programs in other states.
    And from "American Voices," Judy Norsigian, one of the authors of "Our Bodies, Ourselves," provides an historical account of women's health policy debates over the past 40 years.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3112] TOPICS: Congressional Budget Battles; Habemus Papa! PANELISTS: Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Paul Glastris, Washington Monthly; Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#210H] Ending The Silence On Climate Change Encore Presentation:
    Remember climate change? The issue barely comes up with any substance in our current political dialogue. But bringing climate change back into our national conversation is as much a communications challenge as it is a scientific one. This week, scientist Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, joins Bill to describe his efforts to galvanize communities over what's arguably the greatest single threat facing humanity. Leiserowitz, who specializes in the psychology of risk perception, knows better than anyone if people are willing to change their behavior to make a difference. "A pervasive sense up to now has been that climate change is distant - distant in time, and distant in space," Leiserowitz tells Bill. "And what we're now beginning to see is that it's not so distant. I have a 9-year-old son - he's going to be my age in the year 2050. I don't want him to live in the world that we're currently hurtling towards."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3110] A Political Outsider Rises to the Top In Italy CROATIA/GERMANY: HOPING FOR JUSTICE - Croatia is set to join the European Union on July 1. This is giving hope to former Croatian exiles and their families, who want to take former members of the Yugoslav secret service to court. Until the end of the 1980s, Yugoslavia's State Security Administration ordered the murder of numerous Croatians living in exile in Germany. A court in Munich issued a warrant to arrest several suspects, but the men were never extradited to Germany. To this day, the suspected masterminds of the operation continue to live as free men in Croatia. Much of this difficult chapter in the country's recent history remains shrouded in mystery.
    SWEDEN: HOMESICK AT THE ARCTIC CIRCLE - The Arjeplog region in Lapland is known as one of the coldest places in Europe. But it's also a popular spot for automakers to test their cars. Specialists from around the world come here to put the latest prototypes through their paces. They test the models for their ability to handle the cold. A crew from South Korea spent close to three months there, trying to get accustomed to the harsh Scandinavian winter. To keep the technicians happy they brought along their own cook. But the mechanics still get bouts of homesickness and often work long hours to forget their troubles.
    ITALY: THE OUTSIDER - The parliamentary elections are over, but Italy still hasn't been able to form a government. That's because close to 60 percent of Italians voted for political outsiders - like former comedian Beppe Grillo. In the 1980s Grillo was a popular TV personality, known for his biting political satire. Then he became an activist and, eight years ago, started his own blog. In 2007, Grillo organized a massive rally to demand that over two dozen Italian politicians with criminal records leave office. His party "Movimento 5 stelle" or the "Five Stars Movement" won more than 25 percent of the vote in the recent general election, but Grillo has vowed it will not join any coalition.
    GERMANY: SAVING REUTLINGEN'S WORLD RECORD - For six years, the Swabian city of Reutlingen has been the home of the world's narrowest street. But now that record is in danger. The world's narrowest street is just 31 centimeters wide. It's really just a gap between two crooked houses. But Spreuerhofstrasse became famous after it earned a place in the Guinness Book of World Records. It's now one of Reutlingen's biggest tourist attractions. However, the beams of the neighboring half-timbered house are bending and could cause the building to collapse.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#511] China's Great Challenge: An Aging Population Busses in the fast lane: Bogota, Colombia is counting on its TransMilenio express bus network to relieve the city's gridlocks and smog. In addition, we visit some of the few homes for the elderly in China. The People's Republic is scarcely prepared for the demographic change that is only just starting. The details:
    DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE IN CHINA - China is aging rapidly. By 2050 at least a quarter of all Chinese will have reached retirement age. Old age and nursing homes are already in short supply. The health and welfare system is inadequate. Only the urban middle class can afford to hope for a dignified old age. According to Chinese tradition, children should care for their aging parents at home. But more and more seniors find they can't afford to retire. For China's farmers, there are neither nursing homes nor pensions.
    CLIMATE: COLOMBIA - GREEN TRANSPORT - The TransMilenio express bus network in Bogota is considered a model for many megacities in developing countries: commuters fill up the free busses, and bus lanes and bicycle paths take the place of car-filled streets. They're almost as effective as an underground railway system, but cost only a fraction to operate. CO2 emissions from passenger and goods traffic are rising steeply in developing countries. Colombia is trying out various projects to curb that growth.
    TIGERS LIVE DANGEROUSLY - HOW TRADITIONAL MEDICINE IS WIPING THE ANIMALS OUT - There are currently fewer than 4000 tigers living the wild. Above all, the erroneous belief among many Asians in the miraculous healing powers of tiger products is driving demand for them. In ten years the species could be extinct in the wild, with tigers surviving only in zoos. Russia and China have at least agreed to establish a protected zone on the border they share, but the fight against illegal poachers seems hopeless.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#133] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2448] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5237H] * President Barack Obama continued his "charm offensive" this week meeting with House Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill. While the president tried to broker a bipartisan budget deal, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan unveiled a new GOP budget proposal and Senator Patty Murray unveiled the Democratic blueprint. The reactions by both Democrats and Republicans: neither budget is likely to become law. So what will it take to bridge the partisan divide and reach a compromise?
    * Republicans are meeting just outside Washington this week for the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC). Most of the focus will be about finding a way forward for the Republican Party. It will also be a chance for the rising stars of the party like Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Kentucky Senator Rand Paul to rally support from conservative activists for their potential 2016 presidential runs. Also scheduled to speak at CPAC: Paul Ryan, Jeb Bush, the NRA's Wayne LaPierre, Sarah Palin, Donald Trump and Mitt Romney.
    Joining Gwen Ifill to report on the uphill battle to reach a bipartisan budget deal, CPAC, and Organizing for Action (OFA), an Obama campaign organization turned advocacy group, and the role it is playing in promoting the president's second-term agenda: John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report, and Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2421] March 15, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO STRUGGLES - Will City College of San Francisco make the grade and keep its accreditation? The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges has recommended fourteen controversial changes which include layoffs, financial reform, and campus closures. Friday is the deadline for the embattled college to turn in its report showing how the suggested reforms have been and will be implemented.
    SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY MUSICIANS STRIKE - SF Symphony musicians went on strike this week, putting an upcoming high profile tour to the East Coast in jeopardy. Without a contract since February, the union representing the performers says management's new proposals are not on par with comparable orchestras, like those in Los Angeles and Chicago.
    BUDGET CUTS TO CALIFORNIA COURTS - California's top judge, Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye, made the case before state lawmakers this week to restore funding to the courts. More than $1 billion in cuts over the past five years has resulted in court closures, reduced hours and layoffs. Gov. Brown's budget this year would reduce court construction funds by $200 million.
    Guests: Andrea Koskey, San Francisco Examiner; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Cy Musiker, KQED News.
    IRAQ WAR IN PICTURES - On the eve of the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Iraq, an exhibit of photographs at the De Young Museum in San Francisco takes an intimate look at the impact of war on Iraqi citizens. From young boys rehearsing a play about martyrdom to men playing dominos at dusk, the images in "Eye Level in Iraq" offer a glimpse into everyday life as captured by photojournalists Kael Alford and Thorne Anderson. The museum's chief curator Julian Cox talks about the role of art and journalism and what he hopes viewers will take away from the exhibition.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17074Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2201H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3112] TOPICS: Congressional Budget Battles; Habemus Papa! PANELISTS: Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Paul Glastris, Washington Monthly; Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#311H] The Family Planning Fight Continues In the two weeks since the sequester began and the effects are already being felt. One of the federal programs being cut is funding of family planning clinics - those serving primarily low-income and uninsured individuals. With $15 million in cuts slated to happen over the next year, things such as cancer screenings, testing for sexually transmitted infections, and reproductive health care services might suddenly be unavailable to more than 100,000 primarily low-income women across the country.
    Texas has already been down this road. In 2011, the state legislature slashed the budget for family planning services by $73 million dollars for 2012 and 2013. The result? More than 50 family planning clinics across the state closed. NTK's Mona Iskander traveled there last summer and filed this report.
    Anchor Scott Simon interviews Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, who looks at what's happening to these programs in other states.
    And from "American Voices," Judy Norsigian, one of the authors of "Our Bodies, Ourselves," provides an historical account of women's health policy debates over the past 40 years.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#210H] Ending The Silence On Climate Change Encore Presentation:
    Remember climate change? The issue barely comes up with any substance in our current political dialogue. But bringing climate change back into our national conversation is as much a communications challenge as it is a scientific one. This week, scientist Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, joins Bill to describe his efforts to galvanize communities over what's arguably the greatest single threat facing humanity. Leiserowitz, who specializes in the psychology of risk perception, knows better than anyone if people are willing to change their behavior to make a difference. "A pervasive sense up to now has been that climate change is distant - distant in time, and distant in space," Leiserowitz tells Bill. "And what we're now beginning to see is that it's not so distant. I have a 9-year-old son - he's going to be my age in the year 2050. I don't want him to live in the world that we're currently hurtling towards."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Changing Seas [#301H] Alien Invaders In the waters of the western Atlantic and Caribbean, a voracious alien predator has taken hold. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the invasive lionfish is a major threat to biodiversity and the health of already stressed coral reef ecosystems. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#212] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#405] Red Line: Iran, Israel and the Bomb For nearly a decade, Iran's quest for nuclear capabilities has topped global security concerns in Washington, Brussels and Tel Aviv. Why is a nuclear armed Iran considered so dangerous to U.S. and Israeli interests, and what's prevented Iran from reaching a deal year after year? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:30 pm
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#406] The Intervention Calculation The U.S., for better or worse, is often seen as the world's policeman. But the question of when to intervene in other nations' affairs with military force has long stymied American policymakers, from Afghanistan and Iraq to Libya and Syria. Why do we intervene in some conflicts and stand on the sidelines in others? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Elizabeth Winthrop: All The Days of Her Life Provides a fascinating look at the contributions women settlers made in colonial America despite the strict social pressures of the time. Elizabeth Winthrop and other Puritan women exhibited remarkable courage in the face of tremendous adversity. Expert historians chronicle Elizabeth's three marriages, the home schooling of her 10 children, her role as one of the first women land owners in the colonies, her experiences as a church member and her negotiations with the Dutch in "New Amsterdam" to protect her land. Narrated by ABC News' Jackie Judd. duration 28:03   STEREO TVG
  • 3:30 pm
    Overheard with Evan Smith [#301] Gloria Steinem, Author & Activist Gloria Steinem is the most famous feminist in the world: a pioneering activist and best-selling author who co-founded Ms. magazine 40 years ago and is no less enthusiastic about or energized by the fight for gender equality today. duration 26:47   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Marie Antoinette The program examines the life of a callous queen whose opulent lifestyle and open sexuality made her one of the most controversial monarchs in history. Stuck in a loveless marriage and marked by numerous scandals that included gambling and love affairs, Marie Antoinette became the centerpiece in a revolution about change in hierarchy. The two-hour film traces her journey from the splendors of her childhood in the palaces of the mighty Austro-Hungarian Empire to her final hours in a squalid French prison cell. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVM-S (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3112] TOPICS: Congressional Budget Battles; Habemus Papa! PANELISTS: Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Paul Glastris, Washington Monthly; Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5237H] * President Barack Obama continued his "charm offensive" this week meeting with House Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill. While the president tried to broker a bipartisan budget deal, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan unveiled a new GOP budget proposal and Senator Patty Murray unveiled the Democratic blueprint. The reactions by both Democrats and Republicans: neither budget is likely to become law. So what will it take to bridge the partisan divide and reach a compromise?
    * Republicans are meeting just outside Washington this week for the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC). Most of the focus will be about finding a way forward for the Republican Party. It will also be a chance for the rising stars of the party like Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Kentucky Senator Rand Paul to rally support from conservative activists for their potential 2016 presidential runs. Also scheduled to speak at CPAC: Paul Ryan, Jeb Bush, the NRA's Wayne LaPierre, Sarah Palin, Donald Trump and Mitt Romney.
    Joining Gwen Ifill to report on the uphill battle to reach a bipartisan budget deal, CPAC, and Organizing for Action (OFA), an Obama campaign organization turned advocacy group, and the role it is playing in promoting the president's second-term agenda: John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report, and Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2421] March 15, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO STRUGGLES - Will City College of San Francisco make the grade and keep its accreditation? The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges has recommended fourteen controversial changes which include layoffs, financial reform, and campus closures. Friday is the deadline for the embattled college to turn in its report showing how the suggested reforms have been and will be implemented.
    SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY MUSICIANS STRIKE - SF Symphony musicians went on strike this week, putting an upcoming high profile tour to the East Coast in jeopardy. Without a contract since February, the union representing the performers says management's new proposals are not on par with comparable orchestras, like those in Los Angeles and Chicago.
    BUDGET CUTS TO CALIFORNIA COURTS - California's top judge, Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye, made the case before state lawmakers this week to restore funding to the courts. More than $1 billion in cuts over the past five years has resulted in court closures, reduced hours and layoffs. Gov. Brown's budget this year would reduce court construction funds by $200 million.
    Guests: Andrea Koskey, San Francisco Examiner; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Cy Musiker, KQED News.
    IRAQ WAR IN PICTURES - On the eve of the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Iraq, an exhibit of photographs at the De Young Museum in San Francisco takes an intimate look at the impact of war on Iraqi citizens. From young boys rehearsing a play about martyrdom to men playing dominos at dusk, the images in "Eye Level in Iraq" offer a glimpse into everyday life as captured by photojournalists Kael Alford and Thorne Anderson. The museum's chief curator Julian Cox talks about the role of art and journalism and what he hopes viewers will take away from the exhibition.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#301H] Alien Invaders In the waters of the western Atlantic and Caribbean, a voracious alien predator has taken hold. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the invasive lionfish is a major threat to biodiversity and the health of already stressed coral reef ecosystems. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1126] Eastern Canada The 3000km journey starts on the Avalon Peninsula, in Newfoundland & Labrador, the oldest and most easterly part of North America. Though it was the first province discovered by Europeans, it was the last to join Canada in 1949 - a testimony to its independent spirit. Next, GT travels south west to the maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and New Brunswick, known for their rugged coastlines, natural beauty and delicious fresh fish. GT then heads inland to say bonjour to Quebec's European culture and old-world charm and party at the New France Festival. Last is Ontario, where we experience the dizzying heights of Toronto's mega CN Tower and the thundering magnificence of the Niagara Falls. duration 58:01   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Five Rivers Five Voices Across a vast landscape, rivers cut to the very heart of life in the American West. Some are wild, some harnessed by man. Some inspire and renew us, others stand as boundaries and battlegrounds. Meet remarkable individuals who define their lives through five remarkable rivers. In his latest film, Five Rivers Five Voices, John Howe tells the story of five great American rivers and the evocative voices that define them. duration 56:40   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 pm
    In Search of Myths and Heroes [#101] The Queen of Sheba In his first journey, Michael Wood looks for the Queen of Sheba, one of the world's most fascinating heroines. She's been portrayed as goddess, demon, femme fatale - but did she really exist? The myth of Sheba takes Wood on a quest for clues around the Red Sea, from Egypt to Eritrea and Ethiopia and on to the earliest civilization of Arabia in Yemen to reveal the surprising truth behind the legend. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    POV [#2505] The Light In Her Eyes Houda al-Habash, a conservative Muslim preacher, founded a Qur'an school for girls in Damascus, Syria, 30 years ago. Every summer, her female students immerse themselves in a rigorous study of Islam. A surprising cultural shift is underway -- women are claiming space within the mosque. Shot right before the uprising in Syria erupted, "The Light in Her Eyes" offers a portrait of a leader who challenges the women of her community to live according to Islam, without giving up their aspirations. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    American Masters [#2203] Neil Young: Don't Be Denied Neil Young grants rare and unprecedented access for this documentary in which he traces his musical journey in his own words. The film includes new interviews shot in New York and California and utilizes previously unseen performance footage from the star's own extensive archives. It also features cohorts Stephen Stills, Graham Nash, David Crosby, Nils Lofgren and James Taylor. From his first success with Buffalo Springfield to the bi-polar opposites of mega-stardom with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and the soulful rock of Crazy Horse, Young's career has enjoyed many guises. The film takes Young through his rise in the '60's, his solo artist period in the '70's, his '80's embrace of the New Wave, and it ends with Young still refusing to be denied, pursuing a more eclectic musical approach but also touring in the USA with Crosby Stills Nash & Young and teaming on occasion with Crazy Horse. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, March 16, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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XFINITY 192

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