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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Saturday, March 2, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, March 2, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10575] Sequestration * Sequestration Around the Country * Detroit's State of Emergency * Egypt's Economy * "A Place at the Table" * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32063] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2849] Tavis talks with award-winning actor-director-producer Ed Harris. The four-time Oscar nominee explains the premise of his latest film, Phantom. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    America Revealed [#101] Food Machine Over the past century, an American industrial revolution has given rise to the biggest, most productive food machine the world has ever known. In this episode, host Yul Kwon explores how this machine feeds nearly 300 million Americans every day. He discovers engineering marvels we've created by putting nature to work and takes a look at the costs of our insatiable appetite on our health and environment. For the first time in human history, less than 2% of the population can feed the other 98%. How does this all work? Who are the men and women who keep us fed 365 days a year? Kwon embarks on a trip across the country to find out. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2446] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5235] duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2151H] SEQUESTRATION: Funding cuts to most of the programs low income families rely on Sequestration: Funding cuts to most of the programs low income families rely on. The budget axe will slash programs for women and children but some journalists fear women's concerns have been largely left out of budget negotiations.
    MARISSA MAYER: Yahoo's female CEO announced a new company policy that ends telecommuting and requires workers who work remotely or from home to relocate to Yahoo offices.
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: Taking aim at the toxins in everyday personal care products. Illinois Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky wants to see a change in cosmetics so she introduced the Safe Cosmetics Act.
    Panelists: Siobhan "Sam" Bennett, President Women's Campaign Fund; Political Commentator Kelli Goff; Conservative Commentator Mercy Van Schlapp; Crystal Wright, Conservativeblackchick.com; Heather White.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#128] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#309H] As the debate over immigration reform continues in Washington DC, NTK offers an inside look at the lives of Latino farm workers. With the continuation of our "Main Street" series, we visit Salinas, CA, home to John Steinbeck and some of the richest farmlands in the world. John Larson anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3110] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    In Search of Myths and Heroes [#101] The Queen of Sheba/Arthur: The Once & Future King In his first journey, Michael Wood looks for the Queen of Sheba, one of the world's most famous fascinating heroines. She's been portrayed as goddess, demon, femme fatale - but did she really exist? The myth of Sheba takes Wood on a quest for clues around the Red Sea, from Egypt to Eritrea and Ethiopia and on to the earliest civilization of Arabia in Yemen to reveal the surprising truth behind the legend. duration 56:12   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3108] The Swiss Vote On Limiting Corporate Salaries Italians go to the polls later this month. The center-left coalition is favored to win. Many ordinary Italians - as well as investors and the banks - view its leader Mario Monti as a guarantor of economic stability. But scandal-plagued former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi is trying to close the gap. The details:
    ITALY: BERLUSCONI'S FINAL BATTLE - Italians go to the polls later this month. The face of former prime minister and current candidate Silvio Berlusconi can be seen on virtually every TV channel. He's promising jobs, tax cuts and better times. Yet Italy was verging on bankruptcy when he left office less than a year and a half ago. Berlusconi's coalition is still trailing the center-left in the opinion polls. Still his popularity increases with every television interview - in spite of the fact that he's been charged with paying for sex with an underage prostitute. The former prime minister wants to sit in parliament again. He'd even be content just to win in Lombardy, where recent polls say his coalition is out in front. This would allow him to prevent the formation of a stable majority government, to block reforms and even demand a government post, in the hopes of achieving immunity from prosecution.
    GERMANY/SWEDEN: A VIKING STORY - The Viking villages of northern Europe had planned to band together to become a UNESCO World Heritage Site. But now the Swedes have changed their minds. Having UNESCO collectively recognize the places in northern Europe where the Vikings lived and worshipped would have meant more subsidies and more tourism. In the German Viking village of Haithabu they're disappointed with the Swedes' decision to withdraw from the project.
    SWITZERLAND: REFERENDUM ON 'FAT CAT' PAY - On March 3, Swiss voters will decide whether the salaries of top executives should be set by the company's shareholders. The 'yes' side is thought to stand a good chance of winning. The referendum campaign was launched by MP Thomas Minder, a small businessman turned politician from the town of Schaffhausen. If successful, bonuses and salaries for top managers could be limited and golden handshakes eliminated.
    TURKEY: ISTANBUL'S MODERNIZATION CRAZE - With a population of 15 million, Istanbul is one of Europe's fastest-growing cities. In recent years, areas of the city that have been around for centuries have fallen victim to the wrecking ball. Most of the lucrative property is being scooped up by large-scale investors. Owners who refuse to sell can do little to stop the demolitions. By law, the state is allowed to expropriate land in the interest of the common good. Legal challenges to the law have already been dismissed. Now entire districts are controlled by holding companies and a building boom has begun - even though Istanbul is located in an earthquake zone.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#509] A Dirty Business - Drugs In South African Townships The Dominican Republic aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 25 percent by 2030 - an ambitious goal that has made the country one of the global leaders in the effort to combat climate change. To help achieve that emissions target, funding is now flowing to a number of projects, among them an initiative that encourages farmers to manage their land sustainably. The details:
    A DIRTY BUSINESS: DRUGS IN SOUTH AFRICAN TOWNSHIPS - Illegal drug use is a serious problem in South Africa. According to the UN's 2012 World Drug Report, South Africa is the most important producer of crystal meth in the region. After marijuana, crystal meth is the most popular illegal drug in the country. Over the past decade, the rising rate of addiction to crystal meth has become one of the country's biggest economic and social problems.
    YOUNG GLOBAL LEADER - PRESERVING THE AMAZON RAINFOREST IN BRAZIL - Denis B. Minev lives in Manaus, a city in the Amazon rainforest of Brazil. He wants to help maintain the country's economic boom while preserving the tropical rainforest. The former State Secretary for Planning and Economic Development of Amazonas, today Minev is a member of the board of the Amazonas Sustainable Foundation.
    BURMA: PRESERVING AN ARCHITECTURAL LEGACY - Myanmar, or Burma, has begun opening itself to the world. The country's largest city, Rangoon, is a booming center of business and industry. Apartment buildings, shopping centers, and office complexes are cropping up across the city. The transformation is threatening Rangoon's colonial architectural legacy and is causing land prices and rents to reach levels that most local residents can no longer afford.
    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: A COUNTRY TAKES AIM AT CLIMATE CHANGE - The Dominican Republic aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 25% by 2030 - an ambitious goal that has made the country one of the global leaders in the effort to combat climate change. Implementing that goal while promoting economic growth and encouraging tourism as an important economic resource poses a challenge. That's why funding is now flowing to a number of climate-protection projects, among them an initiative that encourages farmers to manage their land sustainably.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#131] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2446] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5235H] * The "sequester" was never supposed to happen. It was a short-term solution agreed to by the White House and Congress in August 2011 as a means to avoid the debt ceiling crisis. But as the March 1 deadline approaches, it looks like $85 billion in deep, across-the-board federal spending cuts will take effect on Friday. That's the same day President Obama has scheduled meetings with congressional leaders to discuss ways to avert the impact of the sequester and address the looming federal debt that currently exceeds $16.5 trillion. Can a twelfth hour deal be reached? And if the automatic cuts do take effect, what will the potential economic impact be? We'll get answers and analysis from David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal and Gloria Borger of CNN.
    * This week the US Supreme Court heard a case challenging a key civil rights law from the 1960's that helped ensure minorities could vote. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 bans discriminatory voting procedures nationwide. It includes a provision that requires some jurisdictions - those in areas with a history of making it difficult for African-Americans to vote - to get federal approval before changing voting procedures. Joan Biskupic of Reuters was at the Supreme Court to hear oral arguments and will report on this closely-watched case.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2419] March 1, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News panel:
    BUDGET SEQUESTRATION - With budget talks on Capitol Hill at an impasse, the nation braces itself for automatic federal spending cuts, also known as "the sequester," that will affect major programs from education to the military. How hard and where will California be hit?
    BAY AREA HOUSING PRICES RISE - Bay Area real estate prices are on the rise. In almost every corner of the region, home-price appreciation is outpacing projected national growth. Whether low-end, high-end or somewhere in the middle, some analysts say there are too few houses for sale to meet buyer appetite.
    PROP. 8 AND DOMA - The Obama administration urged the US Supreme Court to strike down Proposition 8, California's ban on same-sex marriage. Silicon Valley companies, prominent Republicans and several state attorneys general have filed similar briefs in the past weeks as the high court prepares to consider the constitutionality of Prop 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act later this month.
    Guests: Andrew Ross, San Francisco Chronicle; Carolyn Said, San Francisco Chronicle; and Jolie O'Dell, VentureBeat.
    AILEEN HERNANDEZ: A PIONEER FOR WOMEN AND CIVIL RIGHTS - Born in Brooklyn, New York to Jamaican parents, Aileen Clarke Hernandez experienced the insults and injuries of racism and sexism early in life and dedicated herself to combatting those forces. Graduate school and an internship with the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union drew her to California. An early and passionate advocate for women's rights, Hernandez was appointed by President Lyndon Johnson as the only woman to serve on the newly established US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She went on to found and eventually become president of the National Organization for Women. Now in her 80s, she chairs the California Women's Agenda, a state alliance of over 600 organizations, and is the founder and coordinator of the San Francisco Bay Area-based Black Women Stirring the Waters discussion group. Hernandez was recently featured in "Makers", a sweeping PBS documentary that showcases the stories of some of America's most influential women.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17060Z] duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2151H] SEQUESTRATION: Funding cuts to most of the programs low income families rely on Sequestration: Funding cuts to most of the programs low income families rely on. The budget axe will slash programs for women and children but some journalists fear women's concerns have been largely left out of budget negotiations.
    MARISSA MAYER: Yahoo's female CEO announced a new company policy that ends telecommuting and requires workers who work remotely or from home to relocate to Yahoo offices.
    BEHIND THE HEADLINES: Taking aim at the toxins in everyday personal care products. Illinois Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky wants to see a change in cosmetics so she introduced the Safe Cosmetics Act.
    Panelists: Siobhan "Sam" Bennett, President Women's Campaign Fund; Political Commentator Kelli Goff; Conservative Commentator Mercy Van Schlapp; Crystal Wright, Conservativeblackchick.com; Heather White.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3110] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#309H] As the debate over immigration reform continues in Washington DC, NTK offers an inside look at the lives of Latino farm workers. With the continuation of our "Main Street" series, we visit Salinas, CA, home to John Steinbeck and some of the richest farmlands in the world. John Larson anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#208H] Fighting Creeping Creationism * Religious fundamentalists backed by the Right Wing are finding increasingly stealthy ways to challenge evolution with the dogma of creationism. Their strategy includes passing education laws that encourage teaching creationism alongside evolution, and supporting school vouchers to transfer taxpayer money from public to private schools, where they can push a creationist agenda. But they didn't count on 19-year-old anti-creationism activist Zack Kopplin.
    From the time he was a high school senior in his home state of Louisiana, Kopplin has been speaking, debating, cornering politicians, and winning the active support of 78 Nobel Laureates, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the New Orleans City Council, and tens of thousands of students, teachers and others around the country. This week, the Rice University history major joins Bill to talk about fighting laws and voucher programs that let publicly-funded creationist curriculum in the backdoor.
    * Also on the program, journalist and historian Susan Jacoby talks with Bill about the role secularism and intellectual curiosity have played throughout America's history, a topic explored in her new book, The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Free Thought.
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#312H] Hog Wild/Amateur Astronomers Wild pigs are overrunning the Bay Area's parks and open spaces and QUEST meets the amateur stargazers in the Bay Area who are making important observations about the cosmos. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#210] duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#401] Sacred Cow: Defense Spending In An Era Of Economic Restraint For the first time in decades, the U.S. is tightening its belt on defense spending. While traditional threats like nuclear and great power conflicts do remain. The post 9/11 challenges of terrorism and counterinsurgency have led to a paradigm shift in the way we think about our national security. Emerging threats like cybersecurity and biowarfare also require new thinking. Do 21st century challenges now pose a greater threat to U.S. national security than traditional threats like nuclear war, naval supremacy and ability to fight ground wars? Defense in an age of economic uncertainty. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:30 pm
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#402] Power to the People: The New Egypt The US has enjoyed 30 years of relatively stable relations with both Israel and Egypt, thanks in large part to the peace plan outlined by the historic Camp David Accords. The harmony between the two rivals has provided a key element of stability in an otherwise turbulent Middle East. But Egypt's bumpy transition from the autocratic rule of President Hosni Mubarak to its post Arab Spring reality - has put many on edge. What challenges does the new Egypt post for American policymakers and US allies in the region? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Makers: Women Who Make America [#101^] This comprehensive and innovative series tells the compelling story of women's advancement in America over the past 50 years. It is a revolution that has unfolded in public and private, on grand stages like the U.S. Supreme Court and Congress, and humbler ones like the boardroom and the bedroom. The series features the stories of those who led the fight, those who opposed it and those -- both famous and unknown -- caught up in its wake. Meryl Streep narrates the three-hour stack, which features commentary and the stories of Hillary Clinton and Condoleezza Rice, Oprah Winfrey and Katie Couric, and Gloria Steinem and Phyllis Schlafly, among others. duration 2:49:11   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3110] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5235H] * The "sequester" was never supposed to happen. It was a short-term solution agreed to by the White House and Congress in August 2011 as a means to avoid the debt ceiling crisis. But as the March 1 deadline approaches, it looks like $85 billion in deep, across-the-board federal spending cuts will take effect on Friday. That's the same day President Obama has scheduled meetings with congressional leaders to discuss ways to avert the impact of the sequester and address the looming federal debt that currently exceeds $16.5 trillion. Can a twelfth hour deal be reached? And if the automatic cuts do take effect, what will the potential economic impact be? We'll get answers and analysis from David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal and Gloria Borger of CNN.
    * This week the US Supreme Court heard a case challenging a key civil rights law from the 1960's that helped ensure minorities could vote. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 bans discriminatory voting procedures nationwide. It includes a provision that requires some jurisdictions - those in areas with a history of making it difficult for African-Americans to vote - to get federal approval before changing voting procedures. Joan Biskupic of Reuters was at the Supreme Court to hear oral arguments and will report on this closely-watched case.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2419] March 1, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News panel:
    BUDGET SEQUESTRATION - With budget talks on Capitol Hill at an impasse, the nation braces itself for automatic federal spending cuts, also known as "the sequester," that will affect major programs from education to the military. How hard and where will California be hit?
    BAY AREA HOUSING PRICES RISE - Bay Area real estate prices are on the rise. In almost every corner of the region, home-price appreciation is outpacing projected national growth. Whether low-end, high-end or somewhere in the middle, some analysts say there are too few houses for sale to meet buyer appetite.
    PROP. 8 AND DOMA - The Obama administration urged the US Supreme Court to strike down Proposition 8, California's ban on same-sex marriage. Silicon Valley companies, prominent Republicans and several state attorneys general have filed similar briefs in the past weeks as the high court prepares to consider the constitutionality of Prop 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act later this month.
    Guests: Andrew Ross, San Francisco Chronicle; Carolyn Said, San Francisco Chronicle; and Jolie O'Dell, VentureBeat.
    AILEEN HERNANDEZ: A PIONEER FOR WOMEN AND CIVIL RIGHTS - Born in Brooklyn, New York to Jamaican parents, Aileen Clarke Hernandez experienced the insults and injuries of racism and sexism early in life and dedicated herself to combatting those forces. Graduate school and an internship with the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union drew her to California. An early and passionate advocate for women's rights, Hernandez was appointed by President Lyndon Johnson as the only woman to serve on the newly established US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She went on to found and eventually become president of the National Organization for Women. Now in her 80s, she chairs the California Women's Agenda, a state alliance of over 600 organizations, and is the founder and coordinator of the San Francisco Bay Area-based Black Women Stirring the Waters discussion group. Hernandez was recently featured in "Makers", a sweeping PBS documentary that showcases the stories of some of America's most influential women.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#312H] Hog Wild/Amateur Astronomers Wild pigs are overrunning the Bay Area's parks and open spaces and QUEST meets the amateur stargazers in the Bay Area who are making important observations about the cosmos. duration 26:22   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1124] Buenos Aires City Guide Sexy, passionate and sophisticated, Buenos Aires is one of South America's most alluring cities and the perfect place for Globe Trekker newcomer Judith Jones to find her feet...or should we say Tango heels! duration 56:34   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2801] Echo: An Elephant to Remember Echo, the elephant matriarch, was the subject of many "Nature" films and the leader of a carefully studied herd of elephants in Africa. Last year, she died of natural causes. This film is a look back at this remarkable animal through extraordinary footage and interviews with the researchers that cared for and studied this amazing herd. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Battle for the Elephants What is it about elephants that pull us in, that evoke an almost immediate sympathy? Is it that family is so important to them? That they take care of their young? That they play? Or is it that they are simply so big, smart and powerful? Whatever the allure, elephants are popular. And yet, in 2012, the world witnessed the greatest slaughter of elephants since an international ban on the ivory trade was first put in place in 1989. According to some sources, as many as 50,000 elephants were killed across Africa for their tusks. Who is perpetrating the wholesale slaughter of elephants? What's driving the decimation of elephant herds and why is it happening now? What happened to the ban on the trade? Now, National Geographic follows five people, each of whom is waging a battle for the elephant. Their stories reveal that this is an epic tale of supply and demand, of passion and profit, of love and loss, themes borne out in the quests of our five main characters and the many others whose paths they cross. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Inside Nature's Giants [#104H] Big Cats The experts dissect a lion and a tiger. From the outside, the two look very different, but once their skins are removed, even the experts find it hard to tell them apart. Biologist Simon Watt comes face to face with a liger - a cross between a lion and a tiger - proof of the two species' similarity. One of the most characteristic features of these magnificent animals - something that distinguishes them from the small cats - is their ability to roar. The team delves into the lion's throat to find the voicebox and makes a discovery that helps explain the way the vocal apparatus works. Richard Dawkins explains the evolutionary arms race between predators and their prey in the struggle to survive. Finally, the experts try to find out why male lions have a distinctive mane. duration 54:10   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    In Search of Myths and Heroes [#101] The Queen of Sheba/Arthur: The Once & Future King In his first journey, Michael Wood looks for the Queen of Sheba, one of the world's most famous fascinating heroines. She's been portrayed as goddess, demon, femme fatale - but did she really exist? The myth of Sheba takes Wood on a quest for clues around the Red Sea, from Egypt to Eritrea and Ethiopia and on to the earliest civilization of Arabia in Yemen to reveal the surprising truth behind the legend. duration 56:12   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, March 2, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too