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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, February 2, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, February 2, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10555H] Suicide Bomber Kills Security Guard Outside US Embassy In Turkey * Israeli-Palestinian Divide * Hillary Clinton * Shields and Brooks * Super Bowl Weekend duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32043Z] Stocks hit multi-year highs...thanks to positive news on the U.S. job recovery. NBR's Darren Gersh speaks with the Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers Alan Krueger. The world's largest animal health company goes public on the New York Stock Exchange. NBR's Susie Gharib speaks with Zoetis' CEO about what's next for the company. And, the healthcare industry has added jobs every month for almost a decade but the industry is facing big changes in the year ahead. NBR's Tom Hudson speaks with former HHS Secretary Donna Shalala about how changes in the industry could impact jobs. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2829] Tavis talks with four-time Grammy Award-winning soul/R&B legend Aaron Neville about the backstory of his latest project, his new CD "My True Story." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#902H] Airmen and the Headhunters This episode investigates the survival story of a crew of airmen shot down over the jungles of Japanese occupied Borneo during Word War II. A US bomber crew, stranded in a snake infested jungle, was rescued by Dayak tribesmen -- a tribe known for taking the heads of their enemies. The Dayaks fed and protected the airmen before leading them to the base of the maverick British special ops officer, Major Tom Harrisson, who was fighting a guerrilla war against the Japanese with a band of Australian Commandoes. In what is the most unlikely survival story of World War II, the Airmen's hopes of escape were left in the hands of the eccentric Major Harrisson who orchestrated their rescue by building a bamboo runway deep in the Borneo interior. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2442] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week [#5231H] * A mixed bag of economic data has many people scratching their heads about the strength of the economic recovery. US stocks are hovering near all-time highs and the housing market has begun to bounce back. But while unemployment is down slightly, it remains close to 8%. And this week we learned the US economy actually shrank in the final quarter of 2012. Are these new numbers a sign of a temporary slowdown in the economic recovery or something else? We'll get answers and analysis from David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal.
    * President Obama says he expects his sweeping immigration reform to be passed by Congress "within 6 months." Earlier this week 8 senators announced a bipartisan plan for comprehensive immigration reform. Does the push by the president and bipartisan lawmakers, including prominent Republicans signal a new era and openness for immigration reform? And how different are things now than in 2007 when President George W. Bush made a failed push for reform? Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post and Fawn Johnson of National Journal will report on the renewed effort for an immigration overhaul.
    * Defense Secretary nominee Chuck Hagel was pressed on a range of issues from Israel and Iran to gays in the military during his contentious confirmation hearing on Thursday. The former two-term Republican senator from Nebraska took some of the toughest questions from Senate Republicans including Sen. John McCain who challenged Hagel over whether the surge during the Iraq war was worthwhile. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will have a complete report on Hagel's testimony and his defense of his record as he soon hopes to head up the Pentagon.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2147] Special Edition - The Legacy of Hillary Clinton As Hillary Clinton leaves behind her work at the State Department, she sits down with host Bonnie Erbe to share her dedication and commitment to women and girls' empowerment. From First Lady to the US Senate to the State Department, Clinton guides us through her storied career with one common thread: issues facing women and girls. And, she tells us what's next for her. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#124] Outlook 2013 duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#304H] On the second of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the US moving forward, NTK anchor Jeff Greenfield explores how malpractice lawsuits contribute to rising healthcare costs. Correspondent William Brangham travels to Denmark, where medical disputes are settled by experts without ever going to court. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3106] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Shakespeare Uncovered [#102H] The Comedies with Joely Richardson Joely Richardson investigates (with her mother Vanessa Redgrave) the legacy of these two brilliant cross-dressing comedies and the great comic and romantic heroines created by Shakespeare in two perennially popular plays. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3104] duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#505] Environmental Crises in the Garden of Eden IRAQ: THE CRADLE OF CIVILIZATION - The West sees Iraq as a country in chaos, devastated by war. But there's another side to it. It's home to vast wetlands - believed to be the original Garden of Eden - drained and turned into desert by Saddam Hussein. Efforts to restore them began in 2003. But the wetlands are now once again threatened, this time by a major Turkish dam project on the upper reaches of the rivers Tigris and Euphrates. Locals fear for their livelihoods and environmental activists are concerned that a unique ecosystem will be irreversibly destroyed.
    DC CLIMATE WARRIORS - In recent years, more than three dozen climate change pressure groups have been set up in the US. Their aim: To convince Americans that climate change is a fiction. But others in America warn of the pernicious influence of lobbyists on Congress. For climate activists, big polluters are shaping Washington's decisions.
    YOUNG GLOBAL LEADERS: LATIN AMERICA: CHRISTINA K. LOPES - For decades, Latin America was plagued by dictatorships, poverty and violence. But things there have changed of late. DW has caught up with one of our six Young Global Leaders in Latin America. The leaders are those we think will shape the world of tomorrow - in the fields of business, politics, science and sports. Christina K. Lopes is from Brazil, a country whose booming economy has inspired all of Latin America. We talked to the investment fund manager about Brazil's economic prowess, leadership in Latin America and women's rights.
    CLEANER VIETNAM: BIOGAS FROM CASSAVA - Vietnam is one of the 10 biggest producers of cassava in the world. Its manufacture involves generating large quantities of wastewater. The starch in the latter ferments and creates methane - a highly toxic climate killer. The Daklak Tapioca Factory in central Vietnam is now collecting the gas as an energy source and using it to operate the facility. The process helps reduce coal consumption, thereby cutting greenhouse gas emissions.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#127] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2442] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5231H] * A mixed bag of economic data has many people scratching their heads about the strength of the economic recovery. US stocks are hovering near all-time highs and the housing market has begun to bounce back. But while unemployment is down slightly, it remains close to 8%. And this week we learned the US economy actually shrank in the final quarter of 2012. Are these new numbers a sign of a temporary slowdown in the economic recovery or something else? We'll get answers and analysis from David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal.
    * President Obama says he expects his sweeping immigration reform to be passed by Congress "within 6 months." Earlier this week 8 senators announced a bipartisan plan for comprehensive immigration reform. Does the push by the president and bipartisan lawmakers, including prominent Republicans signal a new era and openness for immigration reform? And how different are things now than in 2007 when President George W. Bush made a failed push for reform? Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post and Fawn Johnson of National Journal will report on the renewed effort for an immigration overhaul.
    * Defense Secretary nominee Chuck Hagel was pressed on a range of issues from Israel and Iran to gays in the military during his contentious confirmation hearing on Thursday. The former two-term Republican senator from Nebraska took some of the toughest questions from Senate Republicans including Sen. John McCain who challenged Hagel over whether the surge during the Iraq war was worthwhile. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will have a complete report on Hagel's testimony and his defense of his record as he soon hopes to head up the Pentagon.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2416H] February 1, 2013 Guest Host: Viviana Hurtado.
    IMMIGRATION REFORM ROUNDTABLE - Comprehensive immigration reform is on the table in Washington, with proposals from President Obama and a bipartisan group of eight senators. What is the potential impact on California, home to about 2. 5 million undocumented immigrants, from farmworkers in the Central Valley to high-tech engineers in Silicon Valley? Guests:
    Aarti Kohli, Director of Immigration Policy at the Warren Institute, UC Berkeley;
    Emil Guillermo, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund;
    Marcela Davison Aviles, San Jose Mexican Heritage Festival.
    LAURA'S LAW - San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee announces plans to implement a version of "Laura's Law," a California measure which allows for court-ordered treatment of potentially dangerous mentally ill patients. The law is named for Laura Wilcox, a Nevada County woman who was murdered by a schizophrenic man with a history of violence. Lawmakers around the country are calling for such measures in the wake of recent mass shootings. But as Spencer Michels of PBS NewsHour reports, implementation of Laura's Law remains a challenge.
    SUPER BOWL - Mark Purdy, sports columnist for the San Jose Mercury News, reports from New Orleans, where the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens are warming up for the Super Bowl. It's the sixth time the 49ers are playing in the NFL championship, but the first time that both they and the opposing team will be coached by brothers Jim and John Harbaugh. With construction on a new stadium underway, steadily rising ticket prices, and a potential sixth trophy in the winning, it's an exciting time for the Bay Area team.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17032Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2147] Special Edition - The Legacy of Hillary Clinton As Hillary Clinton leaves behind her work at the State Department, she sits down with host Bonnie Erbe to share her dedication and commitment to women and girls' empowerment. From First Lady to the US Senate to the State Department, Clinton guides us through her storied career with one common thread: issues facing women and girls. And, she tells us what's next for her. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3106] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#305H] The nation's unemployment rate has been hovering just below 8% for months - that means about 12 million Americans are jobless and looking for work. Yet at the same time, firms nationwide say they're having a hard time filling nearly 4 million job openings. Would-be employers say they can't find workers who have the specific skills they're looking for.
    THE SKILLS GAP - Correspondent Rick Karr travels to Mobile, Alabama, to look at that state's efforts to train a new generation of shipyard workers to fight unemployment and attract business to the state.
    INTERVIEW: PETER CAPPELLI - Cappelli is the George W. Taylor Professor of Management at The Wharton School and Director of Wharton's Center for Human Resources, and author of Why Good People Can't Get Jobs: The Skills Gap and What Companies Can Do About It.
    LAWS AND LABOR - George Wentworth, a senior staff attorney at the National Employment Law Project, on the new laws in several states prohibiting hiring discrimination against the unemployed.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#204H] Are Drones Destroying Our Democracy? * In the fight against terrorism, the American military's escalating drone program has become the face of our foreign policy in Pakistan, Yemen and parts of Africa. And while the use of un-manned drones indeed protects American soldiers, the growing number of casualties - which include civilians as well as suspected terrorists - has prompted a UN investigation into both the legality and the deadly toll of these strikes. This week, Bill explores the moral and legal implications of using drones to target our enemies, both foreign and American. His guests include: Vicki Divoll, a former general counsel to the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and former deputy legal adviser to the C.I.A.'s Counterterrorism Center; and Vincent Warren, Executive Director of the Center for Constitutional Rights. < br />* Also on the show, Rolling Stone's Matt Taibbi on the continuing lack of accountability for America's big bankers. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#608H] Agricultural Pests, Sylvia Earle As winters have become warmer, California is becoming more hospitable to destructive insect pests. QUEST investigates how climate change is impacting the state's massive farming industry. Plus, meet two ocean scientists: Stephen Palumbi, who reflects on his career studying tropical corals; and renowned deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#206] duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Black In Latin America [#101H] Haiti & The Dominican Republic: An Island Divided In the Dominican Republic, Professor Gates explores how race has been socially constructed in a society whose people reflect centuries of inter-marriage, and how the country's troubled history with Haiti informs notions about racial classification. In Haiti, Professor Gates tells the story of the birth of the first-ever black republic, and finds out how the slaves' hard fought liberation over Napoleon Bonaparte's French Empire became a double-edged sword. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Black In Latin America [#102H] Cuba: The Next Revolution In Cuba, Professor Gates finds out how the culture, religion, politics and music of this island are inextricably linked to the huge amount of slave labor imported to produce its enormously profitable 19th century sugar industry, and how race and racism have fared since Fidel Castro's Communist revolution in 1959. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Night with Warren Washington Global warming and climate change are topical issues of today. This program features a fascinating look at the word of one of the nation's leading atmospheric scientists, Dr. Warren Washington. Interviewed by the President of the National Academy of Sciences and leading atmospheric scientist Dr. Ralph Cicerone, Dr. Warren Washington explores his family's African American history from the 1900s in Portland, Oregon to his being awarded the National Medal of Science by President Barack Obama in 2010. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1213H] When I Rise This program profiles Barbara Smith Conrad, a gifted University of Texas music student, who finds herself at the epicenter of racial controversy, struggling against the odds and ultimately ascending to the heights of international opera. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3106] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5231H] * A mixed bag of economic data has many people scratching their heads about the strength of the economic recovery. US stocks are hovering near all-time highs and the housing market has begun to bounce back. But while unemployment is down slightly, it remains close to 8%. And this week we learned the US economy actually shrank in the final quarter of 2012. Are these new numbers a sign of a temporary slowdown in the economic recovery or something else? We'll get answers and analysis from David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal.
    * President Obama says he expects his sweeping immigration reform to be passed by Congress "within 6 months." Earlier this week 8 senators announced a bipartisan plan for comprehensive immigration reform. Does the push by the president and bipartisan lawmakers, including prominent Republicans signal a new era and openness for immigration reform? And how different are things now than in 2007 when President George W. Bush made a failed push for reform? Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post and Fawn Johnson of National Journal will report on the renewed effort for an immigration overhaul.
    * Defense Secretary nominee Chuck Hagel was pressed on a range of issues from Israel and Iran to gays in the military during his contentious confirmation hearing on Thursday. The former two-term Republican senator from Nebraska took some of the toughest questions from Senate Republicans including Sen. John McCain who challenged Hagel over whether the surge during the Iraq war was worthwhile. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will have a complete report on Hagel's testimony and his defense of his record as he soon hopes to head up the Pentagon.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2416H] February 1, 2013 Guest Host: Viviana Hurtado.
    IMMIGRATION REFORM ROUNDTABLE - Comprehensive immigration reform is on the table in Washington, with proposals from President Obama and a bipartisan group of eight senators. What is the potential impact on California, home to about 2. 5 million undocumented immigrants, from farmworkers in the Central Valley to high-tech engineers in Silicon Valley? Guests:
    Aarti Kohli, Director of Immigration Policy at the Warren Institute, UC Berkeley;
    Emil Guillermo, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund;
    Marcela Davison Aviles, San Jose Mexican Heritage Festival.
    LAURA'S LAW - San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee announces plans to implement a version of "Laura's Law," a California measure which allows for court-ordered treatment of potentially dangerous mentally ill patients. The law is named for Laura Wilcox, a Nevada County woman who was murdered by a schizophrenic man with a history of violence. Lawmakers around the country are calling for such measures in the wake of recent mass shootings. But as Spencer Michels of PBS NewsHour reports, implementation of Laura's Law remains a challenge.
    SUPER BOWL - Mark Purdy, sports columnist for the San Jose Mercury News, reports from New Orleans, where the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens are warming up for the Super Bowl. It's the sixth time the 49ers are playing in the NFL championship, but the first time that both they and the opposing team will be coached by brothers Jim and John Harbaugh. With construction on a new stadium underway, steadily rising ticket prices, and a potential sixth trophy in the winning, it's an exciting time for the Bay Area team.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#608H] Agricultural Pests, Sylvia Earle As winters have become warmer, California is becoming more hospitable to destructive insect pests. QUEST investigates how climate change is impacting the state's massive farming industry. Plus, meet two ocean scientists: Stephen Palumbi, who reflects on his career studying tropical corals; and renowned deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1120] Papua New Guinea The trekkers explore New Britain Island, the largest in the Bismarck Archipelago of Papua New Guinea. Inhabited by the indigenous Papuans and the Austronesians, the island was captured by the Japanese during World War II. Today the island's traditional cultures are diverse and complex but there are several ancient traditions which remain active today, especially the Dukduk Secret Society. Next, we visit the township of Rabaul, once the provincial capital until it was destroyed in 1994 by a massive volcanic eruption. Rabaul is still a superb location for scuba diving, snorkeling and wreck dives. We travel onwards to the stunningly beautiful island of Bougainville, named after a French navigator, and an excellent location for wreck-diving and sea kayaking. duration 56:31   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3006H] Attenborough's Life Stories: Understanding the Natural World This mini-series focuses on three fields that David Attenborough feels have been transformed most profoundly: filmmaking, science and the environment. Richly illustrated with the sequences he has spent 60 years capturing (re-mastered for the first time in HD), with new interviews in which he revisits the content, stories and locations that were featured in his landmark series and packed with the personal anecdotes of the BBC's most accomplished raconteur, this series will be a synopsis of a unique half-century. duration 56:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4004] Who Killed Lindbergh's Baby? In the aftermath of his 1927 solo transatlantic flight, Charles Lindbergh became the most famous human being on earth. When he and his wife, Anne, had a son, Charlie, the press dubbed him Little Lindy. On March 1, 1932, kidnappers snatched Little Lindy from the family home near Hopewell, New Jersey. Negotiations stretched out for weeks, but Charlie never returned. His body was discovered not five miles from Hopewell. Now, Nova is reopening one of the most confounding crime mysteries of all time as a team of expert investigators employs state-of-the-art forensic and behavioral science techniques in an effort to determine what really happened to Lindbergh's baby - and why. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Life On Fire [#105] Ash Runners Around the Masaya Volcano in Nicaragua, life has struggled for thousands of years to re-emerge from the ashes. Underground, vampire and other bat species have colonized the miles of tunnels created by hot flowing magma. In the crater, parakeets and vultures have made nests on cliffs exposed to toxic gases. On the flanks of this still active mountain, the vegetation has been burnt away by lava flows leaving barren stretches that are recolonized over hundreds of years. At the foot of the volcano, fields, pastures and towns have grown over the oldest lava flows. In this harsh environment, nature struggles to conquer ash and lava before the next eruption erases its efforts ... and the phoenix must rise again. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Shakespeare Uncovered [#102H] The Comedies with Joely Richardson Joely Richardson investigates (with her mother Vanessa Redgrave) the legacy of these two brilliant cross-dressing comedies and the great comic and romantic heroines created by Shakespeare in two perennially popular plays. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, February 2, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

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Comcast 10 and 710
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Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

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Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

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V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

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