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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, January 20, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, January 20, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Egypt's Golden Empire [#103] The Last Great Pharaoh A new dynasty emerges. Threatened from abroad, Ramses II leads an army north to fight the Hittites at Kadesh. The battle becomes his crowning achievement and the basis for a new period of stability and wealth. Resources flood into Egypt. A new capital is built, artisans revel in an explosive period of building and The House of Life becomes the intellectual center for the empire. However, foreign powers once again threaten, and some provinces question their allegiance. After the long reign of Ramses II, the great tombs are systematically looted, and civil war ensues. Though Egypt is once again divided, the period known as the New Kingdom has left a rich legacy that will reverberate through the ages. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:00 am
    Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs Since the discovery of his treasure-filled tomb in 1922, King Tutankhamun has captured the imaginations of people around the world. This Emmy-nominated program highlights the celebrated exhibit of Tutankhamun artifacts - the most impressive collection ever assembled outside of Egypt - at the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale. These objects - ranging from everyday housewares to ornate gold crowns - offer a compelling portrait of the tumultuous times of Tutankhamun and his fabled family. A special exhibition section explores the mystery of Tutankhamun's death (theories range from murder to a tragic hunting accident) through CT scans performed on the young pharaoh's mummified remains. Additionally, a realistic, life-sized bust created by forensic specialists allows visitors to gaze into ancient monarch's face. duration 26:46   TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Bonaparte's Retreat This program recounts Joseph Bonaparte's relationship with his famous older brother, his escape to the United States after his brother's downfall at Waterloo, and his impact on America's fascination with French history and personalities. In 1815, the Frenchman settled in New Jersey, where he lived on a lavish estate, designed elaborate gardens, entertained leading figures of the day and surrounded himself with the largest and most important collection of European fine and decorative art in the US. The documentary is based, in part, on Patricia Stroud's biography The Man Who Had Been King: The American Exile of Napoleon's Brother Joseph, and the fascinating story unfolds through interviews with leading scholars and historians. duration 28:50   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#214] Math & English Essentials Math & English Essentials: Some may think that math and English classes have nothing in common, but as we take a look inside several high school classrooms around the country we'll see they all share a common purpose: make learning relevant. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    America Reframed [#117] New Muslim Cool Puerto Rican-American rapper Hamza P?rez pulled himself out of drug dealing and street life 12 years ago and became a Muslim. Now he's moved to Pittsburgh's tough North Side to start a new religious community, rebuild his shattered family and take his message of faith to other young people through hard-hitting hip-hop music. But when the FBI raids his mosque, Hamza must confront the realities of the post-9/11 world, and himself. New Muslim Cool takes viewers on Hamza's ride through streets, slums and jail cells; following his spiritual journey to some surprising places in an America that never stops changing. Produced in association with Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) and the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM). duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Global Voices [#422] A Son's Sacrifice Imran, a young Muslim American, struggles to take over his father's neighborhood halal slaughterhouse in New York City. duration 25:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Global Voices [#512] Waiting for the Revolution For more than 500 years, the indigenous people of the Andes have had to endure racism and discrimination. Now, with democracy on their side, the time has come for a change. duration 49:06   STEREO
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Colored Frames A reflection on the last 50 years in African-American, exploring the influences, inspirations and experiences of black artists. Beginning at the height of the Civil Rights Era and leading up to the present, this program provides a truthful, unflinching look at often-ignored artists and their progeny. Impressionistic video collages showcase the wide variety, both thematically and stylistically, of contemporary pieces of black artists working in the genres of illustration, abstraction and surrealism, among others. It also chronicles the black artist's struggle for visibility and acceptance in mainstream art society as well as their experiences challenging assumptions about what constitutes "blackness," even within their own community. duration 56:07   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Need To Know [#303H] On the first of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the US moving forward, NTK anchor Jeff Greenfield explores why it now takes nearly four times as long to complete infrastructure projects in the US than it did in the 1970's. By comparison, correspondent Rick Karr reports on how German political parties of every stripe are now backing a multi-billion-dollar plan that is expected to end German use of fossil fuels by 2050. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#606H] Future of Nuclear/Weddell Seals Meet a scientist working to make a safer nuclear reactor design to help meet the world's energy demands. Then head out to the Pacific Flyway to track the timeless rhythms of bird migration. And, travel to icy Antarctica to study hardy Weddell seals with UC Santa Cruz marine biologist Dan Costa. duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1620] INAUGURATION DISCUSSION: On the eve of President Obama's second inauguration, host Bob Abernethy is joined by Harold Dean Trulear, professor of theology at Howard University, the Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, Bishop of Washington, and John Garvey, president of Catholic University, to discuss the dramatic change in the public mood since four years ago and the agenda and outlook for the next four years.
    LYNCHING AND FORGIVENESS: It is one of the darkest stains on America's history - the lynching of thousands of African-American men, women and children in the 19th and 20th centuries - and not only in the South. Bob Faw speaks with elderly African-Americans who either witnessed lynching or lived in fear of it, and who eventually found ways to forgive.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#930] 2013 Economy Exclusive, Part 2 This week WT presents part two of Anchor and Managing Editor Consuelo Mack's annual television exclusive interview with "Financial Thought Leader" Ed Hyman, Wall Street's number one-ranked economist for an unprecedented 30 years running, and BlackRock's star Global Asset Allocation Fund Manager, "Great Investor" Dennis Stattman. They will discuss how to invest this year and the biggest investment surprises for 2013. Part 2 of 2. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#225H] Ric Edelman and his staff investigate the balance between risk and reward hundreds of feet above the ground, take a look at the world of digital media with Variety's Neil Stiles and answers a young man from Florida's questions about the safety of foreign bonds. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2440] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3104] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5229H] In this last week of his first term, President Obama rolled out the biggest US plan to confront gun violence and strengthen gun-control laws in generations. The sweeping proposal includes increased enforcement of existing gun laws, universal background checks, an assault weapons ban, and improved mental health services.
    The political battle over gun rights has intensified since the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December. Recent polls show the majority of Americans favor more stringent gun laws that would close sales loopholes at gun shows and limit high-capacity magazines. The National Rifle Association (NRA) insists the president's plan is an encroachment of their constitutional right to bear arms and says it is prepared for "the fight of the century." < br />In 2009 Barack Obama came into office with soaring approval ratings and an abundance of optimism calling for "a new era of responsibility" in the face of the nation's economic crisis. After a long downturn, the economy is getting stronger. Healthcare reform is the law of the land. But the president has not fulfilled all his first-term promises. Unemployment remains high. The Guantanamo Bay detention prison remains open. And any hopes of fostering bipartisanship seem to have disappeared in a nation that seems to be more politically divided.
    Gwen Ifill will get analysis of President Obama's first-term successes and setbacks and will look ahead to his second-term priorities with: Peter Baker of The New York Times, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News. Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report, and Charles Babington of the Associated Press.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2414H] January 18, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    NEWS PANEL:
    With preparations underway in Washington, D.C. for Monday's historic Presidential Inauguration taking place on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Obama administration took a shot at federal gun control policy. Comprehensive immigration reform is also being tackled, with the Republican Party looking to expand its reach to the increasingly diverse electorate. KQED's Scott Shafer reports from Washington on how California lawmakers are hoping to guide legislation.
    Guests: Scott Shafer, KQED Public Radio; Carla Marinucci and Debra Saunders, San Francisco Chronicle.
    GOVERNOR JERRY BROWN - In an exclusive interview, Gov. Brown talks about his plans for shaping California's future. With a balanced budget in hand and the bold declaration that the state's prisons are no longer in a state of emergency, he talks with PBS NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels about what's next: better funding for schools, improving gun control, and pushing through high speed rail and water projects. The governor also deflects the notion that he's thinking about his legacy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#202H] Fighting The Filibuster * President Obama's second inauguration will be a day of celebration, but whether or not he accomplishes his second-term goals depends on what happens the next day - Tuesday, January 22 - on Capitol Hill. That's when the US Senate decides the fate of the filibuster. Once "the world's most deliberative body", the Senate has become a graveyard of democracy where, says Bill Moyers, "grown men and women are zombified in a process no respectable witch doctor would emulate for fear of a malpractice suit."
    The 112th Congress that just ended - the least productive in the record books - ground to a halt as Republicans mounted scores of filibusters to stop bills, nominations, and judicial appointments. As a result, there are more judicial vacancies today than when Barack Obama took his first oath of office. With minimal effort - and hardly a word spoken - a minority of 41 Senators can prevent the legislators from even discussing issues and legislation; all that's needed is a phone call to the cloakroom to bring the Senate to its knees. The filibuster is "a triumph of hypocrisy," Moyers says, because the party in the majority always wants to reform it, until that same party winds up in the minority and wants to keep it.
    On this week's episode Larry Cohen, president of the 700,000-member Communications Workers of America, joins Moyers to make the case for common-sense reform that would bring the Senate back to serving democracy. Cohen is a leader of the Democracy Initiative, a coalition of nearly 100 progressive organizations campaigning to change the filibuster rules. But time is not on their side. Unless the Senate reforms the filibuster on the first day of the new 113th Congress - Tuesday, January 22 - the minority wrecking crew remains in charge.
    * Later in the show, the combativeness of politics gives way to the clarity of poetry, as poet Mart?n Espada joins Bill to examine life through verse. A one-time lawyer and advocate, Espada has published more than 15 books of poems, translations, and essays, including his latest poetry collection, The Trouble Ball.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2440] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3104] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2145H] GUN DEBATE RAGES ON: Children move to the forefront of the gun control debate as both sides put kids in their campaigns.
    WOMEN IN THE WORKFORCE: Is the US falling behind on women's workplace participation?
    CONGRESSWOMAN KYRSTEN SINEMA: The Arizona Democrat is young, openly bisexual and doesn't align herself with a faith community. This week she shares with us why she is good for her state.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood; Women's National Democratic Club President Nuchhi Currier; FOX News Political Analyst Angela McGlowan.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#125] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#606H] Future of Nuclear/Weddell Seals Meet a scientist working to make a safer nuclear reactor design to help meet the world's energy demands. Then head out to the Pacific Flyway to track the timeless rhythms of bird migration. And, travel to icy Antarctica to study hardy Weddell seals with UC Santa Cruz marine biologist Dan Costa. duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#303H] On the first of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the US moving forward, NTK anchor Jeff Greenfield explores why it now takes nearly four times as long to complete infrastructure projects in the US than it did in the 1970's. By comparison, correspondent Rick Karr reports on how German political parties of every stripe are now backing a multi-billion-dollar plan that is expected to end German use of fossil fuels by 2050. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#202H] Fighting The Filibuster * President Obama's second inauguration will be a day of celebration, but whether or not he accomplishes his second-term goals depends on what happens the next day - Tuesday, January 22 - on Capitol Hill. That's when the US Senate decides the fate of the filibuster. Once "the world's most deliberative body", the Senate has become a graveyard of democracy where, says Bill Moyers, "grown men and women are zombified in a process no respectable witch doctor would emulate for fear of a malpractice suit."
    The 112th Congress that just ended - the least productive in the record books - ground to a halt as Republicans mounted scores of filibusters to stop bills, nominations, and judicial appointments. As a result, there are more judicial vacancies today than when Barack Obama took his first oath of office. With minimal effort - and hardly a word spoken - a minority of 41 Senators can prevent the legislators from even discussing issues and legislation; all that's needed is a phone call to the cloakroom to bring the Senate to its knees. The filibuster is "a triumph of hypocrisy," Moyers says, because the party in the majority always wants to reform it, until that same party winds up in the minority and wants to keep it.
    On this week's episode Larry Cohen, president of the 700,000-member Communications Workers of America, joins Moyers to make the case for common-sense reform that would bring the Senate back to serving democracy. Cohen is a leader of the Democracy Initiative, a coalition of nearly 100 progressive organizations campaigning to change the filibuster rules. But time is not on their side. Unless the Senate reforms the filibuster on the first day of the new 113th Congress - Tuesday, January 22 - the minority wrecking crew remains in charge.
    * Later in the show, the combativeness of politics gives way to the clarity of poetry, as poet Mart?n Espada joins Bill to examine life through verse. A one-time lawyer and advocate, Espada has published more than 15 books of poems, translations, and essays, including his latest poetry collection, The Trouble Ball.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5229H] In this last week of his first term, President Obama rolled out the biggest US plan to confront gun violence and strengthen gun-control laws in generations. The sweeping proposal includes increased enforcement of existing gun laws, universal background checks, an assault weapons ban, and improved mental health services.
    The political battle over gun rights has intensified since the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December. Recent polls show the majority of Americans favor more stringent gun laws that would close sales loopholes at gun shows and limit high-capacity magazines. The National Rifle Association (NRA) insists the president's plan is an encroachment of their constitutional right to bear arms and says it is prepared for "the fight of the century." < br />In 2009 Barack Obama came into office with soaring approval ratings and an abundance of optimism calling for "a new era of responsibility" in the face of the nation's economic crisis. After a long downturn, the economy is getting stronger. Healthcare reform is the law of the land. But the president has not fulfilled all his first-term promises. Unemployment remains high. The Guantanamo Bay detention prison remains open. And any hopes of fostering bipartisanship seem to have disappeared in a nation that seems to be more politically divided.
    Gwen Ifill will get analysis of President Obama's first-term successes and setbacks and will look ahead to his second-term priorities with: Peter Baker of The New York Times, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News. Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report, and Charles Babington of the Associated Press.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2440] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3104] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2414H] January 18, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    NEWS PANEL:
    With preparations underway in Washington, D.C. for Monday's historic Presidential Inauguration taking place on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Obama administration took a shot at federal gun control policy. Comprehensive immigration reform is also being tackled, with the Republican Party looking to expand its reach to the increasingly diverse electorate. KQED's Scott Shafer reports from Washington on how California lawmakers are hoping to guide legislation.
    Guests: Scott Shafer, KQED Public Radio; Carla Marinucci and Debra Saunders, San Francisco Chronicle.
    GOVERNOR JERRY BROWN - In an exclusive interview, Gov. Brown talks about his plans for shaping California's future. With a balanced budget in hand and the bold declaration that the state's prisons are no longer in a state of emergency, he talks with PBS NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels about what's next: better funding for schools, improving gun control, and pushing through high speed rail and water projects. The governor also deflects the notion that he's thinking about his legacy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#606H] Future of Nuclear/Weddell Seals Meet a scientist working to make a safer nuclear reactor design to help meet the world's energy demands. Then head out to the Pacific Flyway to track the timeless rhythms of bird migration. And, travel to icy Antarctica to study hardy Weddell seals with UC Santa Cruz marine biologist Dan Costa. duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Aspen Institute Presents [#107] Our Planet: 7 Billion and Counting Food and water scarcities will put strains on global stability. This episode will explore how our planet is changing under population pressures and what initiatives are in place to alleviate them. David Breashears presents alarming imagery of the Himalayas and its disappearing glaciers, a panel explores whether water could be a flashpoint in the next major conflict and another offers innovative ways for feeding nine billion of us. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#202H] Fighting The Filibuster * President Obama's second inauguration will be a day of celebration, but whether or not he accomplishes his second-term goals depends on what happens the next day - Tuesday, January 22 - on Capitol Hill. That's when the US Senate decides the fate of the filibuster. Once "the world's most deliberative body", the Senate has become a graveyard of democracy where, says Bill Moyers, "grown men and women are zombified in a process no respectable witch doctor would emulate for fear of a malpractice suit."
    The 112th Congress that just ended - the least productive in the record books - ground to a halt as Republicans mounted scores of filibusters to stop bills, nominations, and judicial appointments. As a result, there are more judicial vacancies today than when Barack Obama took his first oath of office. With minimal effort - and hardly a word spoken - a minority of 41 Senators can prevent the legislators from even discussing issues and legislation; all that's needed is a phone call to the cloakroom to bring the Senate to its knees. The filibuster is "a triumph of hypocrisy," Moyers says, because the party in the majority always wants to reform it, until that same party winds up in the minority and wants to keep it.
    On this week's episode Larry Cohen, president of the 700,000-member Communications Workers of America, joins Moyers to make the case for common-sense reform that would bring the Senate back to serving democracy. Cohen is a leader of the Democracy Initiative, a coalition of nearly 100 progressive organizations campaigning to change the filibuster rules. But time is not on their side. Unless the Senate reforms the filibuster on the first day of the new 113th Congress - Tuesday, January 22 - the minority wrecking crew remains in charge.
    * Later in the show, the combativeness of politics gives way to the clarity of poetry, as poet Mart?n Espada joins Bill to examine life through verse. A one-time lawyer and advocate, Espada has published more than 15 books of poems, translations, and essays, including his latest poetry collection, The Trouble Ball.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#117] New Muslim Cool Puerto Rican-American rapper Hamza P?rez pulled himself out of drug dealing and street life 12 years ago and became a Muslim. Now he's moved to Pittsburgh's tough North Side to start a new religious community, rebuild his shattered family and take his message of faith to other young people through hard-hitting hip-hop music. But when the FBI raids his mosque, Hamza must confront the realities of the post-9/11 world, and himself. New Muslim Cool takes viewers on Hamza's ride through streets, slums and jail cells; following his spiritual journey to some surprising places in an America that never stops changing. Produced in association with Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB) and the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM). duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Global Voices [#512] Waiting for the Revolution For more than 500 years, the indigenous people of the Andes have had to endure racism and discrimination. Now, with democracy on their side, the time has come for a change. duration 49:06   STEREO
  • 11:30 pm
    QUEST [#606H] Future of Nuclear/Weddell Seals Meet a scientist working to make a safer nuclear reactor design to help meet the world's energy demands. Then head out to the Pacific Flyway to track the timeless rhythms of bird migration. And, travel to icy Antarctica to study hardy Weddell seals with UC Santa Cruz marine biologist Dan Costa. duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 12:00 am
    Colored Frames A reflection on the last 50 years in African-American, exploring the influences, inspirations and experiences of black artists. Beginning at the height of the Civil Rights Era and leading up to the present, this program provides a truthful, unflinching look at often-ignored artists and their progeny. Impressionistic video collages showcase the wide variety, both thematically and stylistically, of contemporary pieces of black artists working in the genres of illustration, abstraction and surrealism, among others. It also chronicles the black artist's struggle for visibility and acceptance in mainstream art society as well as their experiences challenging assumptions about what constitutes "blackness," even within their own community. duration 56:07   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, January 20, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too