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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

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KQED World: Saturday, January 19, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, January 19, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10545H] Algerian Hostage Crisis * Inauguration * Inaugural Poet * Lance Armstrong * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32033Z] Norwegian Cruise Lines sails to big gains on its first day as a publicly traded company. NBR's Susie Gharib speaks with the company's CEO Kevin Sheehan. Is the IPO market ready to takeoff in 2013. NBR's New York Correspondent Erika Miller takes a look. And, Washington gears up for President Obama's second inauguration. NBR's Ruben Ramirez has details on what the city is doing to prepare. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2819] Any reflection on Tavis' 10 seasons of enlightening conversations on PBS has to include memorable visits with legendary singer-songwriter James Taylor. In his past appearances, the Rock and Rock Hall of Famer reflected on the rough period of his addiction and the reason he doesn't like to listen to himself on the radio. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1002H] Deadliest Battle Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941 was the largest troop offensive in military history. And the Battle of Stalingrad is arguably the deadliest single battle the world has ever seen. The eventual Russian victory has long been lauded as a shining example of Stalin's military genius. He is said to have baited a much more powerful and technologically advanced German army with a carefully executed withdrawal, then caught the Nazis unprepared in a vicious city-block-by-city-block counterattack that decimated the German forces. By the time the battle was over, more than 1 million lives had been lost and the course of the war had been permanently altered. But 70 years after the battle was fought, newly uncovered documents, survivor accounts, and stunning archival footage are revealing a very different picture of a forced retreat, not a tactical one, and of fiercer fighting in the countryside that has previously been suggested. Secrets of the Dead: Deadliest Battle tells the true story of the battle that turned World War II, and established the Soviet Union as a world superpower for the looming Cold War. duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2440] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week [#5229H] In this last week of his first term, President Obama rolled out the biggest US plan to confront gun violence and strengthen gun-control laws in generations. The sweeping proposal includes increased enforcement of existing gun laws, universal background checks, an assault weapons ban, and improved mental health services.
    The political battle over gun rights has intensified since the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December. Recent polls show the majority of Americans favor more stringent gun laws that would close sales loopholes at gun shows and limit high-capacity magazines. The National Rifle Association (NRA) insists the president's plan is an encroachment of their constitutional right to bear arms and says it is prepared for "the fight of the century." < br />In 2009 Barack Obama came into office with soaring approval ratings and an abundance of optimism calling for "a new era of responsibility" in the face of the nation's economic crisis. After a long downturn, the economy is getting stronger. Healthcare reform is the law of the land. But the president has not fulfilled all his first-term promises. Unemployment remains high. The Guantanamo Bay detention prison remains open. And any hopes of fostering bipartisanship seem to have disappeared in a nation that seems to be more politically divided.
    Gwen Ifill will get analysis of President Obama's first-term successes and setbacks and will look ahead to his second-term priorities with: Peter Baker of The New York Times, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News. Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report, and Charles Babington of the Associated Press.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2145H] GUN DEBATE RAGES ON: Children move to the forefront of the gun control debate as both sides put kids in their campaigns.
    WOMEN IN THE WORKFORCE: Is the US falling behind on women's workplace participation?
    CONGRESSWOMAN KYRSTEN SINEMA: The Arizona Democrat is young, openly bisexual and doesn't align herself with a faith community. This week she shares with us why she is good for her state.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood; Women's National Democratic Club President Nuchhi Currier; FOX News Political Analyst Angela McGlowan.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#125] Decision Time for Japan Part 1: Ftas duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#303H] On the first of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the US moving forward, NTK anchor Jeff Greenfield explores why it now takes nearly four times as long to complete infrastructure projects in the US than it did in the 1970's. By comparison, correspondent Rick Karr reports on how German political parties of every stripe are now backing a multi-billion-dollar plan that is expected to end German use of fossil fuels by 2050. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3104] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Egypt's Golden Empire [#103] The Last Great Pharaoh A new dynasty emerges. Threatened from abroad, Ramses II leads an army north to fight the Hittites at Kadesh. The battle becomes his crowning achievement and the basis for a new period of stability and wealth. Resources flood into Egypt. A new capital is built, artisans revel in an explosive period of building and The House of Life becomes the intellectual center for the empire. However, foreign powers once again threaten, and some provinces question their allegiance. After the long reign of Ramses II, the great tombs are systematically looted, and civil war ensues. Though Egypt is once again divided, the period known as the New Kingdom has left a rich legacy that will reverberate through the ages. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3102] Germany's Bounty of Green Energy Overloads The Power Grid CZECH REPUBLIC/GERMANY: THE CZECH REPUBLIC ON THE VERGE OF A BLACKOUT - European energy policy has become a highly-charged issue because the rapid expansion of green electricity in Germany is putting a strain on the power grid in neighboring countries. Twenty percent of the electricity in Germany is generated from sustainable resources. Much of this is generated by wind farms in northern Germany and consumed in the southern part of the country. On especially windy days, the flow of electricity is spilling across Germany's borders and straining the power grids in neighboring countries. Now the Czech Republic is saying it will install security switches to avoid potential overload and blackouts.
    FRANCE: CHURCHES INTO MOSQUES - The sale of church buildings has become commonplace in France - but a recent proposal to convert a church to a mosque has triggered a nationwide controversy. Church congregations in France are dwindling and the town of Vierzon is no exception. With a population of only 27, 000, Vierzon is home to six Roman Catholic churches. To balance its books, the local diocese decided to sell one of the churches. But tempers flared after a Moroccan Muslim organization said it wanted to buy the church and convert it to a mosque.
    AUSTRIA: A BILLIONAIRE TAKES A POLITICAL TURN - In Austria's upcoming parliamentary elections, a new political party that seeks an end to the euro and was founded by billionaire car boss Frank Stronach looks set to get around ten percent of the vote. It's a rags-to-riches story - when Frank Stronach emigrated to Canada in the 1950s, his first job was washing dishes and peeling potatoes in a hospital kitchen. Stronach went on to found Magna, one of the world's leading suppliers to the automotive industry. After returning to Austria some years ago, the auto parts magnate recently launched a new political party there.
    LONDON: SQUATTERS FALL ON HARD TIMES - With rents in London ever on the rise, many squatters have taken over unoccupied properties they say are being kept vacant only for purposes of speculation. One disused office building owned by British Telecom was known for housing a group of squatters who included local homeless, artists and activist groups. Among the uses of the occupied space were simple shelter, a gallery and a music studio. But shortly after new anti-squatting laws were passed in England and Wales, the Telecom squatters also found themselves in jeopardy.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#503] The Scavenger Children of the Philippines A LISTENING POST THAT STRETCHES FROM THE ARID KAROO IN SOUTH AFRICA TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN - 21 countries have joined in a global research project to pick up radio waves from outer space. It will be the world's largest radio astronomy station, using 4000 special antennae built across the southern hemisphere - from southern Africa to Australia and New Zealand.
    PROTECTING THE TROPICAL RAINFOREST IN PERU - Peru has the fourth-largest area of tropical rainforest in the world, but it is also vulnerable to illegal logging - losing up to a million hectares in the past decade. 6 reserves have now been set up to provide living space for the indigenous people and protect the forest. In the El Sira reserve, 600 kilometers northeast of the capital Lima, indigenous people live from growing and harvesting rubber. Up to now, these people have lived from their own products, almost entirely autonomously. But their home region is threatened. International companies and illegal loggers are looking for new tracts of forest to exploit.
    PHILIPPINES: THE SCAVENGER CHILDREN - Evelin and her brothers and sisters are what people call "scavenger children." Their home - Umapad, a suburb of Mandaue City on the island of Cebu - is not so much a village as a garbage dump. The dump provides everything people need to live: wood for their huts, clothes for the children, rice, meat, salad for lunch - and even medicine. The trash is both a curse and a blessing for these families. On the plus side the discarded metal and plastic they collect can be exchanged for cash.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#125] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2440] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5229H] In this last week of his first term, President Obama rolled out the biggest US plan to confront gun violence and strengthen gun-control laws in generations. The sweeping proposal includes increased enforcement of existing gun laws, universal background checks, an assault weapons ban, and improved mental health services.
    The political battle over gun rights has intensified since the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December. Recent polls show the majority of Americans favor more stringent gun laws that would close sales loopholes at gun shows and limit high-capacity magazines. The National Rifle Association (NRA) insists the president's plan is an encroachment of their constitutional right to bear arms and says it is prepared for "the fight of the century." < br />In 2009 Barack Obama came into office with soaring approval ratings and an abundance of optimism calling for "a new era of responsibility" in the face of the nation's economic crisis. After a long downturn, the economy is getting stronger. Healthcare reform is the law of the land. But the president has not fulfilled all his first-term promises. Unemployment remains high. The Guantanamo Bay detention prison remains open. And any hopes of fostering bipartisanship seem to have disappeared in a nation that seems to be more politically divided.
    Gwen Ifill will get analysis of President Obama's first-term successes and setbacks and will look ahead to his second-term priorities with: Peter Baker of The New York Times, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News. Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report, and Charles Babington of the Associated Press.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2414H] January 18, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    NEWS PANEL:
    With preparations underway in Washington, D.C. for Monday's historic Presidential Inauguration taking place on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Obama administration took a shot at federal gun control policy. Comprehensive immigration reform is also being tackled, with the Republican Party looking to expand its reach to the increasingly diverse electorate. KQED's Scott Shafer reports from Washington on how California lawmakers are hoping to guide legislation.
    Guests: Scott Shafer, KQED Public Radio; Carla Marinucci and Debra Saunders, San Francisco Chronicle.
    GOVERNOR JERRY BROWN - In an exclusive interview, Gov. Brown talks about his plans for shaping California's future. With a balanced budget in hand and the bold declaration that the state's prisons are no longer in a state of emergency, he talks with PBS NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels about what's next: better funding for schools, improving gun control, and pushing through high speed rail and water projects. The governor also deflects the notion that he's thinking about his legacy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17018Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2145H] GUN DEBATE RAGES ON: Children move to the forefront of the gun control debate as both sides put kids in their campaigns.
    WOMEN IN THE WORKFORCE: Is the US falling behind on women's workplace participation?
    CONGRESSWOMAN KYRSTEN SINEMA: The Arizona Democrat is young, openly bisexual and doesn't align herself with a faith community. This week she shares with us why she is good for her state.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood; Women's National Democratic Club President Nuchhi Currier; FOX News Political Analyst Angela McGlowan.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3104] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#303H] On the first of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the US moving forward, NTK anchor Jeff Greenfield explores why it now takes nearly four times as long to complete infrastructure projects in the US than it did in the 1970's. By comparison, correspondent Rick Karr reports on how German political parties of every stripe are now backing a multi-billion-dollar plan that is expected to end German use of fossil fuels by 2050. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#202H] Fighting The Filibuster * President Obama's second inauguration will be a day of celebration, but whether or not he accomplishes his second-term goals depends on what happens the next day - Tuesday, January 22 - on Capitol Hill. That's when the US Senate decides the fate of the filibuster. Once "the world's most deliberative body", the Senate has become a graveyard of democracy where, says Bill Moyers, "grown men and women are zombified in a process no respectable witch doctor would emulate for fear of a malpractice suit."
    The 112th Congress that just ended - the least productive in the record books - ground to a halt as Republicans mounted scores of filibusters to stop bills, nominations, and judicial appointments. As a result, there are more judicial vacancies today than when Barack Obama took his first oath of office. With minimal effort - and hardly a word spoken - a minority of 41 Senators can prevent the legislators from even discussing issues and legislation; all that's needed is a phone call to the cloakroom to bring the Senate to its knees. The filibuster is "a triumph of hypocrisy," Moyers says, because the party in the majority always wants to reform it, until that same party winds up in the minority and wants to keep it.
    On this week's episode Larry Cohen, president of the 700,000-member Communications Workers of America, joins Moyers to make the case for common-sense reform that would bring the Senate back to serving democracy. Cohen is a leader of the Democracy Initiative, a coalition of nearly 100 progressive organizations campaigning to change the filibuster rules. But time is not on their side. Unless the Senate reforms the filibuster on the first day of the new 113th Congress - Tuesday, January 22 - the minority wrecking crew remains in charge.
    * Later in the show, the combativeness of politics gives way to the clarity of poetry, as poet Martín Espada joins Bill to examine life through verse. A one-time lawyer and advocate, Espada has published more than 15 books of poems, translations, and essays, including his latest poetry collection, The Trouble Ball.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#606H] Future of Nuclear/Weddell Seals Meet a scientist working to make a safer nuclear reactor design to help meet the world's energy demands. Then head out to the Pacific Flyway to track the timeless rhythms of bird migration. And, travel to icy Antarctica to study hardy Weddell seals with UC Santa Cruz marine biologist Dan Costa. duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#204] duration 25:10   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Secrets of the Manor House 100 years ago, the world of the British Manor House was at its height. It was a world of luxury that that has provided a majestic backdrop to a range of movies and popular costume dramas to this day. But what was really going on behind these stately walls and under the servants' stairs? This program looks beyond the fiction to the truth of how life was in these ancient British houses, and how mounting financial, political and social pressures were about to bring momentous changes to both the wealthy and their servants. The program covers the background of the British titled class in Edwardian times, the realities for servants working in their estates, the concept of the entail that passed estates to the next generation, the growing influence of American wealth in British aristocracy at the beginning of the 20th Century, and the impact of the first world war on the social class system evident at a British country house. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Abolitionists: American Experience, The [#102H] The Abolitionists, Part Two Douglass escapes slavery, eventually joining Garrison in the anti-slavery movement. Threatened with capture by his former owner, Douglass flees to England, returning to the U.S. in 1847. He launches his own anti-slavery paper. John Brown meets with Douglass, revealing his radical plan to raise an army, attack plantations and free the slaves. Harriet Beecher Stowe publishes Uncle Tom's Cabin in 1852. A best-seller, and then wildly successful stage play, this influential novel changes the hearts and minds of millions of Americans. The divide between North and South deepens, touching off a crisis that is about to careen out of control. duration 56:16   STEREO TVPG-VL (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1405] Soul Food Junkies Baffled by his dad's reluctance to change his traditional soul food diet in the face of a health crisis, filmmaker Byron Hurt sets out to learn more about this culinary tradition and it's relevance to black cultural identity. The African American love affair with soul food is deep-rooted, complex, and in some tragic cases, deadly. This film puts this culinary tradition under the microscope to examine both its benefits and consequences. Hurt looks at the socioeconomics of predominantly black neighborhoods, where it can be difficult to find healthy options and wonders if soul food has become an addiction in his community. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Intelligence Squared [#101H] Are Elected Islamists Better Than Dictators? The popular uprisings of the Arab Spring have left a leadership void that Islamist parties have been quick to fill. A longtime supporter of former strongmen like Egypt's Mubarak and Tunisia's Ben Ali, the U. S. now faces the uncomfortable result of Arab democracy-the rise of Islamist parties that are less amenable to the West than their autocratic predecessors. Will the Islamists, who once embraced violence, slowly liberalize as they face the difficulties of state leadership? Or will it mean the growth of anti-Americanism and radicalization in the region? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3104] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5229H] In this last week of his first term, President Obama rolled out the biggest US plan to confront gun violence and strengthen gun-control laws in generations. The sweeping proposal includes increased enforcement of existing gun laws, universal background checks, an assault weapons ban, and improved mental health services.
    The political battle over gun rights has intensified since the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December. Recent polls show the majority of Americans favor more stringent gun laws that would close sales loopholes at gun shows and limit high-capacity magazines. The National Rifle Association (NRA) insists the president's plan is an encroachment of their constitutional right to bear arms and says it is prepared for "the fight of the century." < br />In 2009 Barack Obama came into office with soaring approval ratings and an abundance of optimism calling for "a new era of responsibility" in the face of the nation's economic crisis. After a long downturn, the economy is getting stronger. Healthcare reform is the law of the land. But the president has not fulfilled all his first-term promises. Unemployment remains high. The Guantanamo Bay detention prison remains open. And any hopes of fostering bipartisanship seem to have disappeared in a nation that seems to be more politically divided.
    Gwen Ifill will get analysis of President Obama's first-term successes and setbacks and will look ahead to his second-term priorities with: Peter Baker of The New York Times, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News. Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report, and Charles Babington of the Associated Press.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2414H] January 18, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    NEWS PANEL:
    With preparations underway in Washington, D.C. for Monday's historic Presidential Inauguration taking place on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Obama administration took a shot at federal gun control policy. Comprehensive immigration reform is also being tackled, with the Republican Party looking to expand its reach to the increasingly diverse electorate. KQED's Scott Shafer reports from Washington on how California lawmakers are hoping to guide legislation.
    Guests: Scott Shafer, KQED Public Radio; Carla Marinucci and Debra Saunders, San Francisco Chronicle.
    GOVERNOR JERRY BROWN - In an exclusive interview, Gov. Brown talks about his plans for shaping California's future. With a balanced budget in hand and the bold declaration that the state's prisons are no longer in a state of emergency, he talks with PBS NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels about what's next: better funding for schools, improving gun control, and pushing through high speed rail and water projects. The governor also deflects the notion that he's thinking about his legacy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#606H] Future of Nuclear/Weddell Seals Meet a scientist working to make a safer nuclear reactor design to help meet the world's energy demands. Then head out to the Pacific Flyway to track the timeless rhythms of bird migration. And, travel to icy Antarctica to study hardy Weddell seals with UC Santa Cruz marine biologist Dan Costa. duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1118] Globe Trekker Special: Planet of the Apes Our Trekkers visit the last strongholds of many rare and sometimes endangered species of primates. Justine Shapiro heads to Thailand in search of the White-Handed Gibbon. Holly Morris, Ian Wright and Megan McCormick get up close and personal with the orangutan in Borneo and Sumatra, the chimpanzee in Tanzania and Zambia and the Mountain Gorilla in the remote mountains of Uganda. Ian glimpses the elusive Golden Bamboo Lemur on Madagascar, Eils Nevitt discovers the Black-Crowned Dwarf Marmoset - at six inches high, the world's second-smallest monkey - in the Amazon jungle and Zay Harding encounters two enormous and extremely rare apes in Africa: the Drill in Cameroon and the Mandrill, known as the world's largest monkey, in Gabon. duration 56:24   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2608] Why We Love Cats and Dogs? Ask anyone and they immediately know -- they're either a dog person or a cat person. What is this all about? Follow an in-depth investigation into the great divide between dogs and cats and just what draws us to these two polarizing pets. Animal behaviorists, psychologists, trainers and devoted owners all weigh in. Dogs, we discover, are geniuses at reading what we want and the complex cat-human bond can be as fickle or as deep as a marriage. Funny, touching and provocative, we ask how well we really know our best friends and why we love them so much. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3905#] Ice Age Death Trap In a race against developers in the Rockies, archaeologists uncover a unique site packed with astonishingly preserved bones of mammoths, mastodons and other giant extinct beasts, opening a vivid window on the vanished world of the Ice Age. duration 55:41   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Life On Fire [#103] The Surprise Salmon In Alaska, the fresh water that feeds the rivers is snowmelt from North America's highest mountains and most active volcanoes. Time and again, they erupt and poison the rivers. Scientists have only just begun to piece together what might have happened nearly 2,000 years ago, when one race of salmon faced the death of their natal river and were forced back to the open ocean on an exceptional adventure. Navigating between the sulphurous waters, bears, sharks and eagles, the fish escaped the Earth's wrath to give birth to descendants that continue their pioneering journey to the heart of an active volcano. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Egypt's Golden Empire [#103] The Last Great Pharaoh A new dynasty emerges. Threatened from abroad, Ramses II leads an army north to fight the Hittites at Kadesh. The battle becomes his crowning achievement and the basis for a new period of stability and wealth. Resources flood into Egypt. A new capital is built, artisans revel in an explosive period of building and The House of Life becomes the intellectual center for the empire. However, foreign powers once again threaten, and some provinces question their allegiance. After the long reign of Ramses II, the great tombs are systematically looted, and civil war ensues. Though Egypt is once again divided, the period known as the New Kingdom has left a rich legacy that will reverberate through the ages. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
Saturday, January 19, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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