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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, January 5, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, January 5, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10535H] New Jobs Report * Syria Update * Reading Guarantee * Confirmation Woes * Shields & Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32023Z] U.S. businesses add 155,000 jobs in December. NBR's Suzanne Pratt takes a look at what's ahead for hiring in 2013. Better late than never. 11 weeks after Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast...Congress finally signs off $9B in federal aid for storm victims. NBR's Ruben Ramirez takes a look at the vote and where the money is going. And, the outlook for orange juice. A new threat may be on the horizon that could send juice prices higher. NBR's Allison Worrell has more on a fruit disease that's threatening the industry. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2809] Tavis talks with Oscar winner Matt Damon, who recaps his new feature, Promised Land - in which he stars and also co-wrote and co-produced. (Part 1 of 2) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Frontline [#3021H] Climate of Doubt Four years ago, climate change was hot. Politicians from both parties, pressed by an anxious public, seemed poised to act. But that was then. Today, public opinion about the climate issue has cooled and politicians either ignore the issue or loudly proclaim their skepticism of scientific evidence that human activity is imperiling the planet. What's behind this reversal? Frontline correspondent John Hockenberry, of PRI's The Takeaway, goes inside the organizations that fought the scientific establishment, environmental groups, and lawmakers to shift the direction of debate on climate issues and redefine the politics of global warming. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2438] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week [#5227H] After months of political brinkmanship, Congress reached a last-minute compromise to avoid the fiscal cliff. The deal averted raising taxes on most middle-class Americans but it didn't address the nation's serious deficit problems. Lawmakers postponed a decision on spending cuts for another two months.
    Vice President Biden and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell hammered out the New Year's Day deal that further highlighted the deep partisan politics that have prevented lawmakers from reaching any long-term or lasting solutions. Had the deal not been reached, the US economic recovery could have stalled and had a ripple effect on global economies. So what happens next and will the new 113th Congress that was sworn into office today be able to bridge the entrenched partisan divide in Washington?
    Gwen Ifill examines the political fallout of the fiscal negotiations and looks ahead to the next showdown over raising the federal debt ceiling with: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Susan Davis of USA Today, Eamon Javers of CNBC, and Michael Viqueira of NBC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2143H] Tammy Duckworth: The Illinois Democrat and Iraq War veteran shares the story of her service and her injury, in her own words. Violence Against Women: After a brutal attack against a Indian woman in New Delhi, the international women's rights community is calling for change. No More Babies: Birth rates are declining for families in the Latino community. Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Hispanic Leadership Network Executive Director Jennifer Sevilla Korn; The Public Notice's Gretchen Hamel. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#123] North Korea: Targeting The Us? duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#301H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3102] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#152H] Ending The Silence On Climate Change * Even as sadness turns to outrage over the Newtown tragedy, and powerful coalitions of leaders and celebrities speak out, those who value guns over lives continue unfazed and unabated. Bill Moyers reports on how the NRA and gun merchants continue to strong-arm Congress and state legislatures into keeping any and all discussion of sensible gun control off the table.
    * Also on the show, remember climate change? For the first time since 1984, the issue didn't even come up in a presidential debate. But bringing climate change back into our national conversation is as much a communications challenge as it is a scientific one. Scientist Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, joins Bill to describe his efforts to do what even Hurricane Sandy couldn't - galvanize communities over what's arguably the greatest single threat facing humanity. Leiserowitz, who specializes in the psychology of risk perception, knows better than anyone if people are willing to change their behavior to make a difference.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3052] duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#501] Social Entrepreneur Helps Turn Autism into a Vocational Advantage: Danish social entrepreneur Thorkil Sonne set up an IT company called "Specialisterne" in 2004. It's a consulting company, that employs people with autism. Their difficulties are often accompanied by unique talents, such as razor-sharp memories, great powers of concentration, precision and an eye for detail. Such skills make them particularly suited to working for computer or software companies. Sonne thought it was unfair that people with autism were practically locked out of the labor market and set himself the ambitious goal of creating one million jobs for them worldwide. Climate: Peruvian Farmers Battle Climate Change: Peru's northern coastline is increasingly being battered by storms and other extreme weather linked to climate change. Now together with a local financial establishment, the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ) has set up an insurance system that helps compensate farmers in the case of damage. Valentin Ruiz, the chairman of the Cooperative of Banana Producers in the region, is worried by the effects that storms and flooding have on the banana crop. To protect banana producers from the effects of El Nino, he and his members have collected money for dams and levees. Climate - Biodiesel Makes Life Easier for Women in Benin: Seventy percent of people in the West African state of Benin live in the countryside. Most of them don't have any electricity. North of the capital Porto Novo, the French organization Geres is overseeing a project that makes life a bit easier, by helping people to process their food with the help of machines. The project is primarily targeted at women in the Zou region, who have got together to form cooperatives. Geres has set up 35 plants where women can process their foodstuffs. As diesel is expensive, the machines are run on biodiesel. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#123] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2438] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5227H] After months of political brinkmanship, Congress reached a last-minute compromise to avoid the fiscal cliff. The deal averted raising taxes on most middle-class Americans but it didn't address the nation's serious deficit problems. Lawmakers postponed a decision on spending cuts for another two months.
    Vice President Biden and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell hammered out the New Year's Day deal that further highlighted the deep partisan politics that have prevented lawmakers from reaching any long-term or lasting solutions. Had the deal not been reached, the US economic recovery could have stalled and had a ripple effect on global economies. So what happens next and will the new 113th Congress that was sworn into office today be able to bridge the entrenched partisan divide in Washington?
    Gwen Ifill examines the political fallout of the fiscal negotiations and looks ahead to the next showdown over raising the federal debt ceiling with: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Susan Davis of USA Today, Eamon Javers of CNBC, and Michael Viqueira of NBC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Critical Condition: California's Emergency Rooms This documentary focuses on the crisis facing emergency rooms in California, and takes a look at the impact that overcrowded emergency rooms have on doctors, nurses and ultimately patients. duration 26:32   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    LinkAsia [#123] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2143H] Tammy Duckworth: The Illinois Democrat and Iraq War veteran shares the story of her service and her injury, in her own words. Violence Against Women: After a brutal attack against a Indian woman in New Delhi, the international women's rights community is calling for change. No More Babies: Birth rates are declining for families in the Latino community. Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Hispanic Leadership Network Executive Director Jennifer Sevilla Korn; The Public Notice's Gretchen Hamel. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3102] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#301H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#152H] Ending The Silence On Climate Change * Even as sadness turns to outrage over the Newtown tragedy, and powerful coalitions of leaders and celebrities speak out, those who value guns over lives continue unfazed and unabated. Bill Moyers reports on how the NRA and gun merchants continue to strong-arm Congress and state legislatures into keeping any and all discussion of sensible gun control off the table.
    * Also on the show, remember climate change? For the first time since 1984, the issue didn't even come up in a presidential debate. But bringing climate change back into our national conversation is as much a communications challenge as it is a scientific one. Scientist Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, joins Bill to describe his efforts to do what even Hurricane Sandy couldn't - galvanize communities over what's arguably the greatest single threat facing humanity. Leiserowitz, who specializes in the psychology of risk perception, knows better than anyone if people are willing to change their behavior to make a difference.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#408H] Amazing Jellies & Siphonophores / From Waste to Watts Learn about the glowing, gelatinous animals - jellyfish and siphonophores - that populate Monterey Bay; and find out how San Francisco's gourmet restaurants are turning leftovers into green electricity. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#202] duration 25:11   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1609] Rachel L. Swarns - The Roots of All of Us Michelle Obama's family saga is a remarkable American story-a journey from slavery to the White House in five generations. American Tapestry: The Story of the Black, White, and Multiracial Ancestors of Michelle Obama traces the tale of Mrs. Obama's ancestors, a history that the First Lady did not even know herself. Rachel L. Swarns, a New York Times correspondent, brings into focus the First Lady's black, white, and multiracial forebears. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Peter and Paul and the Christian Revolution [#101Z] The Rock and the River With their Messiah executed, their dreams crushed and their cause deemed subversive by the strongest empire the world had ever seen, Jesus's followers faced a bleak future. Their movement seemed destined for extinction. Incredibly, though, Jesus's survivors turned defeat to victory; devastation to jubilation. By one account, it happened on the shores of the Sea of Galilee where Simon Peter and others envisioned the risen Jesus. Re-infused with hope and determination, Peter became an indomitable figure who would unite his group into a tight community of ardent believers. Dark days were coming however -- days of persecution, imprisonment and dispersal. And when they arrived, Peter found support from an unexpected source. His name was Paul. Paul had a startling revelation that led him to embrace Peter's faith as his own. It was a turning point in history. For once inspired, Paul turned his formidable talents to the task of spreading his new cause around the Roman Empire. Paul was educated, passionate and determined. But he was also dogmatic. And soon, he would be at the center of the most divisive conflict yet to face the young Jesus movement. duration 56:27   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Peter and Paul and the Christian Revolution [#102Z] The Empire and the Kingdom Spread outside Judea by missionaries likePeter and Paul, the Jesus movement caught on quickly among Jews and non-Jews around the Roman Empire. With success, however, came challenges: challenges from hostile locals, imperial forces and from conflicting ideas within the movement itself. Paul -- adamant that there was no time for conversions -- fell into open and angry confrontation with some of the oldest Jesus followers. Peter, it seems, tried to mediate the conflict. "The Rock" became a stepping stone between the camps and, for a crucial period, helped keep the movement together. But the center could not hold. Paul struck out on his own, planting churches in his image around the Mediterranean and writing letters that would become central to all later Christian theology. Finally, in 70 AD, disaster struck the headquarters of the Jesus followers. After decades of rising tension, Judea erupted in revolt against Rome. War had been raging for four years. And when Rome finally established control, it destroyed much of Jerusalem; it torched the sacred Temple and enslaved the population. The scorched ground of Judea could no longer nurture a Jewish Jesus movement. And in the end, it was Paul's communities that would grow and change into the churches we know today. duration 1:14:55   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Intelligence Squared U.S. [#208] The Rich Are Taxed Enough How do we fix the economy? The U.S. government's budget deficit is nearing a trillion dollars for the fourth straight year and unemployment remains high. With the Bush-era tax cuts that are set to expire at the end of 2012, what is the best move for continued economic recovery? President Obama says we should raise taxes on those making more than $250,000 to reduce the deficit. Others say that the richest 1% already pay more than a quarter of all federal taxes and higher taxes for job creators would slow economic growth. Are the nation's wealthiest not paying their "fair share," or should tax breaks be extended for everyone in the name of job creation? duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3102] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5227H] After months of political brinkmanship, Congress reached a last-minute compromise to avoid the fiscal cliff. The deal averted raising taxes on most middle-class Americans but it didn't address the nation's serious deficit problems. Lawmakers postponed a decision on spending cuts for another two months.
    Vice President Biden and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell hammered out the New Year's Day deal that further highlighted the deep partisan politics that have prevented lawmakers from reaching any long-term or lasting solutions. Had the deal not been reached, the US economic recovery could have stalled and had a ripple effect on global economies. So what happens next and will the new 113th Congress that was sworn into office today be able to bridge the entrenched partisan divide in Washington?
    Gwen Ifill examines the political fallout of the fiscal negotiations and looks ahead to the next showdown over raising the federal debt ceiling with: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Susan Davis of USA Today, Eamon Javers of CNBC, and Michael Viqueira of NBC News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Critical Condition: California's Emergency Rooms This documentary focuses on the crisis facing emergency rooms in California, and takes a look at the impact that overcrowded emergency rooms have on doctors, nurses and ultimately patients. duration 26:32   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#408H] Amazing Jellies & Siphonophores / From Waste to Watts Learn about the glowing, gelatinous animals - jellyfish and siphonophores - that populate Monterey Bay; and find out how San Francisco's gourmet restaurants are turning leftovers into green electricity. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1116] Globe Trekker Special: World History-England Justine Shapiro starts her historical journey dodging swords in a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings, then travels up the coast to visit the Royal Pavilion in Brighton. Passing through London, she takes a canal ride up to the Yorkshire Moors where she boards a double-decker bus/hotel. The next stop is Whitby, the eerie coastal town that inspired Bram Stoker to write "Dracula." Justine strolls along Hadrian's Wall, has a chance meeting with a centurion and rides a steam train before visiting Liverpool, home of The Beatles. Venturing south into England's West Country, Justine meets the very eccentric Marquess of Bath and joins a pagan celebration in Glastonbury before ending her journey in Ottery St. Mary, where the locals run through the narrow streets with huge, flaming tar barrels to celebrate Guy Fawkes Night. duration 57:43   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2809#] Broken Tail: A Tiger's Last Journey Irish cameraman Colin Stafford-Johnson spent almost 600 days filming Broken Tail and his family for some of the finest tiger documentaries ever made. Broken Tail was the most charismatic tiger cub ever seen in Ranthambore, one of India's best protected tiger reserves. But suddenly and without warning Broken Tail abandoned his sanctuary and went on the run, moving through farmland and scrub until he was killed by a train nearly 200 miles from his home. To track Broken Tail's incredible journey, Colin and his soundman, Salim, retrace the tiger's path and piece together the cub's last days - and through his story reveal the fate of the few surviving tigers in India. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4001H] Doomsday Volcanoes In April, 2010 the eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano turned much of the northern hemisphere into an ash-strewn no-fly zone, stranding hundreds of thousands of travelers. But Eyjafjallajokull was just the start. Now, an Icelandic volcano 10 times bigger, Katla, has begun to swell and grumble. Two more giants, Hekla and Laki, could erupt without warning. Iceland is a ticking time bomb: When it blows, the consequences will be global. As CGI takes us inside these geological monsters, we meet atmospheric scientists who are working to understand just how devastating an eruption could be -- not just for air travel but for the global food supply and for Earth's climate. Could we be plunged into years of cold and famine? What can we do to prepare for the disaster to come? duration 54:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Life On Fire [#101] Icelandic Volcanoes The 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland provoked economic chaos by paralyzing a major air traffic network for days. This eruption, however, was mild. Much more powerful volcanoes in Iceland are ready to wake up. Through spectacular aerial footage of this country, which is an accumulation of lava and ash, a maze of craters and faults, the episode tries to discern which volcano could wake up next and what the consequences of a major eruption are likely to be. Europe has come to realize that a colossal power sleeps beneath Iceland, while Icelanders for centuries have learned to live amongst their volcanoes. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Model T's to War: American Ambulances on the Western Front, 1914-1918 Between 1914 and 1917 - prior to the United States' entry into World War I - more than 3000 American volunteers, paying their own passage, set sail for France to aid the war effort. This program focuses on the valiant work of the American Field Service, ambulance sections assigned to help the French Army in its fight against German forces.
    These young men drove Ford-built Model T's to the frontlines and saw their greatest glory in the battle of Verdun in 1916, when Field Service ambulances transported more than 250,000 wounded. Although American readers regularly followed the adventures of these brave ambulanciers through numerous accounts published in local and national newspapers of the era, few today know about their heroic deeds. This documentary seeks to shed light on this forgotten story. It takes viewers on an archaeological journey of discovery - from French battlefield sites still littered with World War I artifacts to recently discovered silent-film footage and hundreds of previously unpublished war-time photographs.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, January 5, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too