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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, December 8, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, December 8, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32003Z] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17342Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10515H] Jobs * Same-Sex Marriage * Shellfish * Shields and Brooks * Tweeting History duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18250H] (original broadcast date: 12/07/12)
    * Gustavo Dudamel, Music Director of the Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra discusses his upcoming performance at Carnegie Hall
    * musician and author David Byrne discusses his latest book "How Music Works."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2750] Tavis talks with newspaper reporter turned best-selling mystery writer Michael Connelly about his return to the Harry Bosch novel series with The Black Box. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 3:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32003Z] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10515H] Jobs * Same-Sex Marriage * Shellfish * Shields and Brooks * Tweeting History duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#2095] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#448] Are Climate Change Summits Really Worth The Energy? How can the world curb climate change? The first step is to cut carbon emissions by at least 25 percent. In order to make this target official, politicians and environmental activists are coming together for another UN Climate Change Conference - this time in Doha, Qatar. Getting them all there, however, will leave a serious carbon footprint. duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3048] duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1614H] HAITI PRIEST DOCTOR - Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on Father Rick Frechette who came to Haiti 25 years ago to build a school and shelter for orphans. Seeing the need for doctors, he subsequently went to medical school and his mission now operates the largest pediatric hospital in Haiti as well orphanages schools and other hospitals in that troubled nation.
    EVANGELICALS AND THE ELECTION - Host Bob Abernethy talks with Southern Baptist and culture war leader Richard Land, who is stepping down next year as President of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission. Despite conservative defeats in the election, Land insists there is no reason for the religious right to soften any of its positions - on abortion, gay marriage or anything else.
    HANUKKAH LAMPS - As the 8-day Hanukkah festival of lights approaches, Susan Braunstein, curator of the Jewish Museum of New York describes the lamps and menorahs that have been used over time to celebrate the holiday.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#148H] Big Media's Power Play * In 1983, 50 corporations controlled a majority of American media. Now that number is 6. And Big Media may get even bigger, thanks to the FCC's consideration of ending a rule preventing companies from owning a newspaper and radio and TV stations in the same big city. Such a move would give these massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition, control the public message, and also limit diversity across the media landscape. On this week's Moyers & Company, Senator Bernie Sanders, one of several Senators who have written FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski asking him to suspend the plan, joins Bill to discuss why Big Media is a threat to democracy and what citizens can do to fight back.
    * Also on the show, former Republican Congressman Mickey Edwards shares his perspective on the fiscal cliff debate, the influence of tax pledger Grover Norquist, and why both political parties require radical change. Edwards chaired the Republican Policy Committee, was a founding trustee of the conservative Heritage Foundation, and served as National Chairman of the American Conservative Union.
    * Finally, Bill Moyers offers his own perspective on why there's more to Norquist's unusual pledge than ideology or principle.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2434] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5223H] * President Obama and Republican House Speaker John Boehner have each proposed plans to reach a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff but remain divided on the specifics of tax increases and spending cuts. While both sides seem to agree that a plunge off the cliff would be disastrous, no one seems to be rushing to stop it. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times and Eamon Javers of CNBC will have analysis on the public and behind-closed-door negotiations and examine whether the economy has the momentum to absorb the shock if the country does go over the fiscal cliff.
    * One of biggest critics of any compromise proposal to avoid the fiscal cliff is Republican Senator Jim DeMint. In recent days the Tea Party activist has publically objected to Boehner's plan to raise revenue and reduce spending. But today the South Carolina senator surprised many with his announcement that he is resigning from the Senate to become president of a conservative think tank. Amy Walter of ABC News will take a closer look at some of the other post-election policy battles that have ignited an intra-party power struggle among Republicans.
    * US intelligence has confirmed that the Syrian government of Bashar Al-Assad is mixing chemical components of sarin nerve gas and loading the deadly agent into bombs. President Obama has warned the Syrian government not to use chemical weapons against rebel forces or its own citizens but is there more the US can do? James Kitfield of National Journal reports why the costs of doing nothing about Syria's civil war are beginning to outweigh the risks of doing something.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2409H] December 7, 2012 Guest Host: Thuy Vu
    NEWS PANEL:
    OAKLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT AVOIDS FEDERAL TAKEOVER - The City of Oakland struck a deal with civil rights attorneys who sought an unprecedented federal takeover of the police department. At issue was a case involving the so-called Riders, four police officers who were accused in 2000 of imposing vigilante justice in West Oakland. The deal, which hands tremendous power from OPD to a court-appointed director, still needs to be approved by a federal judge.
    NEW FUNDING TO MAKE SCHOOLS ENERGY EFFICIENT - New funding made available by the recent passage of Prop 39 may go toward making as many as half of the state's schools more energy efficient. The measure, put on the November ballot by billionaire investor Tom Steyer, closes a tax loophole on out-of-state corporations that will generate $1.1 billion a year. Half of that money will fund projects to install new windows, better insulation, modern lighting and more efficient heating and air conditioning at thousands of public schools.
    BOYS OF COLOR EXPECT TO FAIL - By kindergarten, 1 in 4 African American boys believe they will fail in school. That's one of several disturbing findings in a report commissioned by a state Assembly committee. Education, health and employment were identified as the most significant areas of concern for boys of color.
    Guests: Matthai Kuruvila, San Francisco Chronicle; Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News; and Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    SAL KHAN INTERVIEW - Over six million students around the world are familiar with his voice and his on-line videos, featuring colorful chalkboard-style drawings. But many may not know his face: Sal Khan is the founder of Khan Academy and a pioneer in the online education movement. His videos are short and simple and available to anyone around the world, for free. In an interview at his Silicon Valley offices, Khan talks with guest host Thuy Vu about the importance of self-paced learning and what his approach can offer the California education system.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17342Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2139H] DNA Sequencing A look at how DNA sequencing is helping children with rare diseases cope. TTC talks to Molecular and Human Genetics Professor, Dr. James Lupski Decoding DNA: The second segment focuses on genetic mapping and finding cures for children with rare diseases. TTC talks to the Director of Human Genome Project, Dr. Richard Gibbs. Diagnosing Disease: In the conclusion of our series on genetic mapping and rare pediatric diseases, we examine the barriers families face when it comes to diagnosing rare conditions. TTC sits down with a family whose twin children were diagnosed with Segawa Dystonia at a young age. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3050] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#265H] NTK examines how the Texas legislature has slashed funding to reproductive planning programs because conservative lawmakers believe they encourage abortions. Anchor Scott Simon interviews Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, who looks at what's happening to these programs in other states. And from "American Voices," Judy Norsigian, one of the authors of "Our Bodies, Ourselves," provides an historical account of women's health policy debates over the past 40 years. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#148H] Big Media's Power Play * In 1983, 50 corporations controlled a majority of American media. Now that number is 6. And Big Media may get even bigger, thanks to the FCC's consideration of ending a rule preventing companies from owning a newspaper and radio and TV stations in the same big city. Such a move would give these massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition, control the public message, and also limit diversity across the media landscape. On this week's Moyers & Company, Senator Bernie Sanders, one of several Senators who have written FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski asking him to suspend the plan, joins Bill to discuss why Big Media is a threat to democracy and what citizens can do to fight back.
    * Also on the show, former Republican Congressman Mickey Edwards shares his perspective on the fiscal cliff debate, the influence of tax pledger Grover Norquist, and why both political parties require radical change. Edwards chaired the Republican Policy Committee, was a founding trustee of the conservative Heritage Foundation, and served as National Chairman of the American Conservative Union.
    * Finally, Bill Moyers offers his own perspective on why there's more to Norquist's unusual pledge than ideology or principle.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    War Against Microbes, The Producer Michael Schwarz (Mystery of Memory, The Body's Secret Army, Botany of Desire, Muhammad: Legacy of A Prophet), brings his gift for unraveling complex topics to the subject of infectious diseases. In the past century, the tremendous expansion of scientific knowledge about the causes of infectious diseases has helped to more than double average global life expectancy. But as far as we've come, we still face some very daunting scientific challenges. The War Against Microbes takes viewers on an eye-opening journey through some of the most important advances in our understanding of infectious diseases, focusing on the relentless efforts of Nobel Prize laureates to uncover the mysteries of the body's smallest adversaries. From the dawn of bacteriology up through today's cutting-edge research, each generation of scientists continues to pursue the same question: can we one day declare victory in the war against microbes? The filmmakers travel to California to examine the effects of polio on a survivor and then look at the work of generations of scientiest who defied conventional wisdom as they searched for a vaccine. In Australia, we meet Barry Marshall and Robin Warren, who in the 1980s encountered steep resistance when they found evidence that bacteria called helicobacter pylori caused stomach ulcers - a discovery that flew in the face of conventional medical wisdom. But nearly two decades later, Marshall and Warren were rewarded for their tenacity with the 2005 Nobel Prize. The War Against Microbes charts both the progress we've made in understanding infectious diseases and the challenges that still remain. As Barry Marshall puts it, "we have come a very long way in infectious disease science over the last hundred or so years. But don't assume that everything has been discovered." duration 28:52   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#150] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1604] Marcus Brauchli and Chris Cillizza - The Long Battle Ahead: The 2012 Presidential Election and How The Washington Post W Marcus Brauchli, Washington Post executive editor, oversees print and digital news operations. Previously, he had served as managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, overseeing its print and online news operations, both in the US and internationally. Chris Cillizza writes "The Fix," a politics blog for The Washington Post. He also covers the White House for the newspaper and web site. Cillizza has appeared as a guest on NBC, CBS, ABC, MSNBC, Fox News Channel, and CNN. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Kalb Report [#601] Why Murrow Matters in the Digital Age In this episode, "Why Murrow Matters in the Digital Age", taped at the Radio-Television Digital News Association's annual conference, public radio's Bob Edwards leads a panel of journalists striving to apply the innovation, ethics and substance of legendary journalist Edward R. Murrow's work to today's digital medium. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    Jewish Soldiers In Blue & Gray This program explores the little-known sacrifices American Jews made for both the Union and the Confederacy during the Civil War. Recently unearthed personal narratives shed new light on this fascinating chapter in American history and powerfully illustrate the unique role Jews played on the battlefields and the home front. Narrated by Oscar-nominated screenwriter John Milius (Apocalypse Now) and with Sam Waterston providing the voice of President Lincoln, the documentary chronicles Major General Ulysses S.Grant's infamous 1862 mandate to expel Jewish residents from Union-controlled land and shares the story of President Lincoln's doctor-turned-Union spy. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Heart of the Civil War Recounting critical battles of the Civil War, The Heart of the Civil War tells stories from some of the most fought-over U.S. territory during the War Between the States. Between 1861 and 1865, Confederate and Union forces clashed again and again for control of strategic points throughout three counties in west-central Maryland - as the war marched north-to-south from the confederacy to the union, and back again. The Heart of the Civil War recounts the war's far-reaching impact on the lives of ordinary but battle-weary Marylanders caught up in now-famous local battles, the conflicted struggles of believers in the confederate cause living on Union soil, and the turbulent, unpredictable politics of war that ultimately helped to preserve the Union. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3050] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5223H] * President Obama and Republican House Speaker John Boehner have each proposed plans to reach a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff but remain divided on the specifics of tax increases and spending cuts. While both sides seem to agree that a plunge off the cliff would be disastrous, no one seems to be rushing to stop it. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times and Eamon Javers of CNBC will have analysis on the public and behind-closed-door negotiations and examine whether the economy has the momentum to absorb the shock if the country does go over the fiscal cliff.
    * One of biggest critics of any compromise proposal to avoid the fiscal cliff is Republican Senator Jim DeMint. In recent days the Tea Party activist has publically objected to Boehner's plan to raise revenue and reduce spending. But today the South Carolina senator surprised many with his announcement that he is resigning from the Senate to become president of a conservative think tank. Amy Walter of ABC News will take a closer look at some of the other post-election policy battles that have ignited an intra-party power struggle among Republicans.
    * US intelligence has confirmed that the Syrian government of Bashar Al-Assad is mixing chemical components of sarin nerve gas and loading the deadly agent into bombs. President Obama has warned the Syrian government not to use chemical weapons against rebel forces or its own citizens but is there more the US can do? James Kitfield of National Journal reports why the costs of doing nothing about Syria's civil war are beginning to outweigh the risks of doing something.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2409H] December 7, 2012 Guest Host: Thuy Vu
    NEWS PANEL:
    OAKLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT AVOIDS FEDERAL TAKEOVER - The City of Oakland struck a deal with civil rights attorneys who sought an unprecedented federal takeover of the police department. At issue was a case involving the so-called Riders, four police officers who were accused in 2000 of imposing vigilante justice in West Oakland. The deal, which hands tremendous power from OPD to a court-appointed director, still needs to be approved by a federal judge.
    NEW FUNDING TO MAKE SCHOOLS ENERGY EFFICIENT - New funding made available by the recent passage of Prop 39 may go toward making as many as half of the state's schools more energy efficient. The measure, put on the November ballot by billionaire investor Tom Steyer, closes a tax loophole on out-of-state corporations that will generate $1.1 billion a year. Half of that money will fund projects to install new windows, better insulation, modern lighting and more efficient heating and air conditioning at thousands of public schools.
    BOYS OF COLOR EXPECT TO FAIL - By kindergarten, 1 in 4 African American boys believe they will fail in school. That's one of several disturbing findings in a report commissioned by a state Assembly committee. Education, health and employment were identified as the most significant areas of concern for boys of color.
    Guests: Matthai Kuruvila, San Francisco Chronicle; Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News; and Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    SAL KHAN INTERVIEW - Over six million students around the world are familiar with his voice and his on-line videos, featuring colorful chalkboard-style drawings. But many may not know his face: Sal Khan is the founder of Khan Academy and a pioneer in the online education movement. His videos are short and simple and available to anyone around the world, for free. In an interview at his Silicon Valley offices, Khan talks with guest host Thuy Vu about the importance of self-paced learning and what his approach can offer the California education system.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    War Against Microbes, The Producer Michael Schwarz (Mystery of Memory, The Body's Secret Army, Botany of Desire, Muhammad: Legacy of A Prophet), brings his gift for unraveling complex topics to the subject of infectious diseases. In the past century, the tremendous expansion of scientific knowledge about the causes of infectious diseases has helped to more than double average global life expectancy. But as far as we've come, we still face some very daunting scientific challenges. The War Against Microbes takes viewers on an eye-opening journey through some of the most important advances in our understanding of infectious diseases, focusing on the relentless efforts of Nobel Prize laureates to uncover the mysteries of the body's smallest adversaries. From the dawn of bacteriology up through today's cutting-edge research, each generation of scientists continues to pursue the same question: can we one day declare victory in the war against microbes? The filmmakers travel to California to examine the effects of polio on a survivor and then look at the work of generations of scientiest who defied conventional wisdom as they searched for a vaccine. In Australia, we meet Barry Marshall and Robin Warren, who in the 1980s encountered steep resistance when they found evidence that bacteria called helicobacter pylori caused stomach ulcers - a discovery that flew in the face of conventional medical wisdom. But nearly two decades later, Marshall and Warren were rewarded for their tenacity with the 2005 Nobel Prize. The War Against Microbes charts both the progress we've made in understanding infectious diseases and the challenges that still remain. As Barry Marshall puts it, "we have come a very long way in infectious disease science over the last hundred or so years. But don't assume that everything has been discovered." duration 28:52   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1112] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Scandinavia Merrilees Parker takes a culinary tour around Scandinavia, a region infused with Viking history and heritage. She begins her travels at a Viking festival, learns how to smoke herring in a Swedish village, assists with the smorgasbord at the Midsummer Festival, prepares moose with Lars Backman - the inspiration for the Swedish Chef on "The Muppet Show" - and cooks with the Sami people at the Arctic Circle. duration 57:32   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2607H] Drakensberg: Barrier of Spears The Drakensberg Mountains are Southern Africa's Alps, rising more than 11,000 feet into the sky. But beneath their shimmering beauty lies an incredibly hostile environment for the surprising number of creatures that manage to live there. Each spring, drenching rains destroy the grasslands at the base of the mountains, and those who would survive must climb straight up sheer cliffs of volcanic rock, through gauntlets of storms and snow, to reach the carpets of grass on the plateau. The baboons that make this astonishing annual journey may have the advantage of agility, but eland, the world's largest antelope, have long, spindly legs and heavy bodies, which make the climb all but unbelievable. All have babies at their sides while vultures circle overhead. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    POV [#2314] The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers Why would a dedicated Cold War strategist throw away his career, his friends and risk life in prison for a chance to help end the Vietnam War? In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg, a leading military planner, concluded that America's role in the war was based on decades of lies. He leaked the Pentagon Papers, 7000 pages of top-secret documents, to The New York Times, a daring act of conscience that led to Watergate, President Nixon's resignation and the end of the Vietnam War. "The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers" is a tale told by Ellsberg with a who's who of Vietnam and Watergate-era figures. duration 1:56:32   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#148H] Big Media's Power Play * In 1983, 50 corporations controlled a majority of American media. Now that number is 6. And Big Media may get even bigger, thanks to the FCC's consideration of ending a rule preventing companies from owning a newspaper and radio and TV stations in the same big city. Such a move would give these massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition, control the public message, and also limit diversity across the media landscape. On this week's Moyers & Company, Senator Bernie Sanders, one of several Senators who have written FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski asking him to suspend the plan, joins Bill to discuss why Big Media is a threat to democracy and what citizens can do to fight back.
    * Also on the show, former Republican Congressman Mickey Edwards shares his perspective on the fiscal cliff debate, the influence of tax pledger Grover Norquist, and why both political parties require radical change. Edwards chaired the Republican Policy Committee, was a founding trustee of the conservative Heritage Foundation, and served as National Chairman of the American Conservative Union.
    * Finally, Bill Moyers offers his own perspective on why there's more to Norquist's unusual pledge than ideology or principle.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
Saturday, December 8, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

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KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too