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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, October 27, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, October 27, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31345Z] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17300Z] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10485H] Economic News * Microsoft Tablet * Battleground Dispatch: Ohio * Shields and Brooks * Louise Erdrich duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18220H] (original broadcast date: 10/26/12)
    * Dame Judi Dench discusses her role as 'M' in the latest James Bond movie Skyfall.
    * photographer Mario Testino on his work and solo show "In Your Face" at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2720Z] Tavis talks with Salman Khan, founder of the online educational organization, Khan Academy. The education pioneer relates his vision for the future, as detailed in his text, The One World Schoolhouse. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31345Z] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10485H] Economic News * Microsoft Tablet * Battleground Dispatch: Ohio * Shields and Brooks * Louise Erdrich duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#2065] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#442] Protecting One of Mexico's Most Diverse Habitats PROTECTING ONE OF MEXICO'S MOST DIVERSE HABITATS - The Sierra Madre Oriental is one of Mexico's most diverse natural habitats. But climate change and unsustainable forestry practices are threatening the ecosystem. Parts of the mountain range have been under official protection for decades but that hasn't made much of a difference: the area is large and difficult to control, and it's impossible to stop people who live in the region from cultivating food crops. Mexico's National Commission on Protected Natural Areas is bringing a new focus to the task of protecting biodiversity. duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    European Journal [#3042] duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1608H] NONE OF THE ABOVE - RELIGIOUS IMPLICATIONS: In this concluding segment of a three-part miniseries, Deborah Potter looks at how the rapidly growing numbers of the religiously unaffiliated could affect churches and the roles of pastors. These so-called "nones" now make up nearly 20% of adult Americans.
    JONI EARECKSON TADA - BREAST CANCER UPDATE: In 2010, when managing editor Kim Lawton interviewed Joni Eareckson Tada, the popular evangelical author and speaker had just been diagnosed with breast cancer. This Breast Cancer Awareness month, Lawton talks with Tada, one of the longest surviving quadriplegics on record, about her 2-year-long battle with the disease and how it has affected her marriage and her faith.
    BELIEF AND PRACTICE - THE HAJJ: At the Dar Al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Falls Church, Virginia children are led through a mock Hajj, performing the various rituals associated with the annual pilgrimage to Mecca. Imam Johari Abdul-Malik explains the journey to Mecca which is one of the five pillars of Islam that Muslims are called upon to perform at least once in their lifetime if they are physically and financially able to do so.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#142H] What Did The Debates Tell Us? * Four debates have come and gone, and in the aftermath of the pomp, points, and politics, what have we learned? And how has democracy been served? This week, two of the country's most astute political media observers - Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Marty Kaplan - join Bill to weigh in on the rhetoric and realities of two campaigns now in the home stretch, looking to make their cases by any means affordable. Jamieson is director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and the driving force behind the acclaimed online watchdog FactCheck.org. Marty Kaplan is the founding director of the Norman Lear Center at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
    * Bill is later joined by Neil Barofsky, who held the thankless job of special inspector general in charge of policing TARP, the bailout's Troubled Asset and Relief Plan. Between President Obama's ineffectual proposals and Mitt Romney's loving embrace, bankers have little to fear from either administration, and that leaves the rest of America on perilously thin economic ice. Barofsky discusses the critical yet unmet need to tackle banking reform and avoid another financial meltdown. Currently a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the New York University School of Law, Barofsky is the author of Bailout: An Inside Account of How Washington Abandoned Main Street While Rescuing Wall Street.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2428] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5217H] During these final days of the presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney will be crisscrossing the country to rally their base support, encourage early voting, and win over undecided voters in key battleground states. So which candidate has the stronger ground game and sprint-to-the-finish campaign strategy? And did the final debate on foreign policy give either candidate an edge in the national polls?
    The battle for Senate control rests in a few states. Regardless of who wins, a divided Congress could be one of the biggest problems facing the next president. We will take a closer look at the tossup states that could shift the balance of power.
    Joining Gwen Ifill with analysis of the 2012 election: James Kitfield of National Journal, Gloria Borger of CNN, Molly Ball of The Atlantic, and Susan Davis of USA Today.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2404H] October 26, 2012 Guest Host: Al Letson
    There's a lot riding on the November 6 election for California's once prized public education system. With $ 6 billion in trigger cuts looming due to the state budget deficit, two competing tax measures on the ballot propose to temporarily help fill the gap. Gov. Jerry Brown's Proposition 30 would raise the state sales tax a quarter cent and income tax on those earning more than $ 250,000 annually. Competing Proposition 38, sponsored by millionaire attorney Molly Munger, would increase income tax on a sliding scale for those earning at least $7316 a year.
    We devote the full program to looking at how public education is financed in California, and hear from educators, students, policy experts and politicians about how we got here, and what solutions might provide a way out. < br />Studio Guests:
    Darrell Steinberg, California State Senate President pro Tem
    Arun Ramanathan, The Education Trust-West
    Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle
    Louis Freedberg, EdSource
    duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17300Z] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2133H] WOMEN - THE COVETED VOTING BLOC: From waitress moms to the debates about women's health and incendiary comments like GOP Senate Candidate Richard Mourdock's saying pregnancy was something that "God intended" even if produced by rape - we head into the last days before the Presidential election.
    EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT DECRIES "MEN ONLY" POLICY: Members of the European Parliament rejected a male candidate for a position at the European Central Bank because he was a man. Is this gender discrimination?
    KATHLEEN TURNER ON HER NEW ROLE: Interview with the actress as she dabbles in art and politics in her new play, "Red Hot Patriot." She plays the bold journalist, Molly Ivins.
    Panelists: National Council of Negro Women Executive Director Avis Jones-DeWeever; Independent Women's Forum Policy Analyst Hadley Heath; SpikeTheWaterCooler.com Founder Marjorie Clifton; Conservative Blogger Crystal Wright.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3044] Homestretch Face-Off (The Third Debate) Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#259H] CHANGES TO FLORIDA ELECTION RULES: Rick Carr reports on controversial changes to election rules in the battleground state of Florida - will they root out voter fraud or keep legitimate voters from the polls? < br />THE 47%: A conversation with James Carter, the man behind the infamous '47?%' video, who, like other amateur opposition researchers, is harnessing the power of the internet to upend campaigns.
    AMERICAN VOICES: Comedian Dean Obeidallah on one group of voters that no one seems to be courting.
    duration 26:46   STEREO
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#142H] What Did The Debates Tell Us? * Four debates have come and gone, and in the aftermath of the pomp, points, and politics, what have we learned? And how has democracy been served? This week, two of the country's most astute political media observers - Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Marty Kaplan - join Bill to weigh in on the rhetoric and realities of two campaigns now in the home stretch, looking to make their cases by any means affordable. Jamieson is director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and the driving force behind the acclaimed online watchdog FactCheck.org. Marty Kaplan is the founding director of the Norman Lear Center at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
    * Bill is later joined by Neil Barofsky, who held the thankless job of special inspector general in charge of policing TARP, the bailout's Troubled Asset and Relief Plan. Between President Obama's ineffectual proposals and Mitt Romney's loving embrace, bankers have little to fear from either administration, and that leaves the rest of America on perilously thin economic ice. Barofsky discusses the critical yet unmet need to tackle banking reform and avoid another financial meltdown. Currently a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the New York University School of Law, Barofsky is the author of Bailout: An Inside Account of How Washington Abandoned Main Street While Rescuing Wall Street.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    This American Land [#213] Future Conservation Leaders, Natural Resources Revival, Fight for Frogs, Amazing Monarch Journey Future Conservation Leaders: Santa Cruz Island, off the coast of California, is home to bald eagles, scrub jays, and the most adorable foxes you may ever see! This summer, the island is also home to high school students from the Los Angeles area, working side by side with scientists. Co-host Caroline Raville spent some time with these young people to learn about LEAF, Leaders in Environmental Action for the Future. This Nature Conservancy program not only gives high school students a chance to enjoy nature, but provides a spark for many of them to pursue careers in science and conservation.
    Natural Resources Revival: A county in eastern Oregon has transformed from being dependent on timber, to being a pioneer in using its natural resources. Lake County is known as the "Saudi Arabia" of geothermal power. Its schools and hospitals are already taking advantage of sustainable energy sources including solar and wind power as well. Folks who used to be at odds, from the lumber industry and conservation groups, have put aside their differences to come up with sustainable answers for the future.
    A Fight for Frogs: A third of the world's amphibians face extinction, with more than 400 animals listed as "critically endangered." Habitat loss is one major threat, and that's the challenge for the gopher frog. Their population is now at an alarming low. These amphibians need both sandy, forested areas, and wetlands in order to breed. But development is making it tougher and tougher for them to survive. Sharon Collins of Georgia Public Broadcasting shows us how scientists are working to save these animals.
    Amazing Monarch Journey: Monarch butterflies, up to two billion of them, have to fly hundreds of miles to get to their wintering site in Mexico. So even a tiny impact on their migration ability could mean the difference between survival and death. Ecologist Sonia Altizer studies how long distance migration in flying animals may also affect the spread and evolution of infectious disease. These beautiful insects face many threats. Habitat destruction is also taking a hit on them. But a look at their winter home is one of the most stunningly beautiful sights in nature!
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1510] Jodi Kantor - The Obamas Jodi Kantor has covered the world of Barack and Michelle Obama since the beginning of 2007, also writing about Hillary Clinton, John McCain, Sarah Palin, Richard Holbrooke, Eric Holder and many others along the way. Ms. Kantor graduated from Columbia and attended Harvard Law School. But soon after she arrived, she caught the journalism bug, took time off to work at Slate.com, and never looked back. She joined The New York Times in 2003 as Arts & Leisure editor, revamping the section and helping lead a makeover of the culture report. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Alan Alda in Scientific American Frontiers [#1205] Growing Up Different Many children face challenges far beyond the usual stresses and strains of growing up. Alda meets several kids who are growing up different, along with the doctors and researchers who are trying to mitigate the difficulties they face. The program looks at the controversial use of cochlear implants to give some hearing to profoundly deaf kids, the latest in augmentative communication technology to provide speech to children without it, new insights on the fundamental nature of autism and the implications for treating autistic children. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    History Detectives [#510] Uss Thresher/Pete Gray Cartoon/Manhattan Project Letter * USS Thresher - A contributor in Chicopee, Massachusetts, has a stack of technical drawings and engineering documents he found in his late great-uncle's basement some years ago. A few of the documents bear the numbers and letters SSN-593, an appellation that belonged to the nuclear submarine USS Thresher, an attack class vessel that had been the pride of the U. S. Navy during the Cold War. On April 10, 1963, the Thresher was undergoing deep-sea trials when, along with its nuclear reactor, the vessel and all hands sank 220 miles off the coast of Massachusetts. Gwen Wright travels to New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts to explore one of the most traumatic events in U.S. Naval history and to determine just how the contributor's great-uncle could've come into possession of documents linked to one of the most secret weapons in the U.S. Cold War arsenal.
    * Pete Gray Cartoon - A comic book collector in Brooklyn, New York, owns several storyboards from a cartoon comic strip dating to the immediate post-World War II period. The strip relates the story of Pete Gray, the first one-armed major league baseball player, who later became an icon for disabled WWII veterans. The contributor is curious to learn the identity of the mystery cartoonist. Because many artists from the golden age of cartoons - the late 1930s through the 50s - often moonlighted in advertising or more "respectable" trades, their identities were often undisclosed. Elyse Luray heads to Baltimore's Camden Yards and to comics hot spots in New York City to examine how cartoon artists helped reframe popular culture in the mid-20th century.
    * Manhattan Project Letter - A contributor in New York City has a scrapbook of typed and handwritten documents connected with the top-secret Manhattan Project, which developed the United States' first nuclear bombs during World War II. The most intriguing item is a letter dated just after the war. It's a plea for reduced secrecy regarding nuclear affairs in the scientific community once hostilities ended. Did the scientists' letter help persuade President Harry S. Truman to change policy in the post-war era? Host Wes Cowan leads HD to New York City to track down the authors of the documents and to explore the delicate balance between science, military power and democracy.
    duration 56:03   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Original Minds Five teenagers stigmatized by being in Special Ed. struggle to articulate how their brains work, and discover that they are smarter than they thought. In a one-size-fits-all educational system, kids with learning disabilities suffer from lack of self-esteem. They become alienated and drop out. But the protagonists of ORIGINAL MINDS buck the trend. They work intensively with the filmmaker to tell their own stories. Their narratives reveal the unique approach to learning that each must discern and claim as his or her own if they are to succeed in the world. duration 57:10   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3044] Homestretch Face-Off (The Third Debate) Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5217H] During these final days of the presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney will be crisscrossing the country to rally their base support, encourage early voting, and win over undecided voters in key battleground states. So which candidate has the stronger ground game and sprint-to-the-finish campaign strategy? And did the final debate on foreign policy give either candidate an edge in the national polls?
    The battle for Senate control rests in a few states. Regardless of who wins, a divided Congress could be one of the biggest problems facing the next president. We will take a closer look at the tossup states that could shift the balance of power.
    Joining Gwen Ifill with analysis of the 2012 election: James Kitfield of National Journal, Gloria Borger of CNN, Molly Ball of The Atlantic, and Susan Davis of USA Today.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2404H] October 26, 2012 Guest Host: Al Letson
    There's a lot riding on the November 6 election for California's once prized public education system. With $ 6 billion in trigger cuts looming due to the state budget deficit, two competing tax measures on the ballot propose to temporarily help fill the gap. Gov. Jerry Brown's Proposition 30 would raise the state sales tax a quarter cent and income tax on those earning more than $ 250,000 annually. Competing Proposition 38, sponsored by millionaire attorney Molly Munger, would increase income tax on a sliding scale for those earning at least $7316 a year.
    We devote the full program to looking at how public education is financed in California, and hear from educators, students, policy experts and politicians about how we got here, and what solutions might provide a way out. < br />Studio Guests:
    Darrell Steinberg, California State Senate President pro Tem
    Arun Ramanathan, The Education Trust-West
    Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle
    Louis Freedberg, EdSource
    duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1106] Bangladesh Holly Morris kicks off her trip in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh and the seventh largest city in the world. She then travels to Sunderban National Park for an encounter with Bengal tigers and a trek deep into the forest to find honey. Along the way, Holly visits a "floating" school, charms snakes, harvests tea in the hills of Sylhet, visits the ship-breaking yards in Chittagong and relaxes in the seaside resort of Cox's Bazaar near the Myanmar border. duration 57:35   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3002H] Magic of the Snowy Owl This episode explores the world of the snowy owl, a bird recently made popular by Hedwig, Harry Potter's faithful companion. Turning fantasy into reality, "Magic of the Snowy Owl" takes an intimate look at how these majestic birds survive in one of the most isolated and inhospitable places on the planet. Noted wildlife filmmaker Fergus Beeley ("Jungle Eagle") takes viewers deep into the "snowy's" tundra home on the North Slope of Alaska to observe the daily struggles involved in raising a family of helpless chicks until they are able to fly. Viewers will discover that these strikingly beautiful Arctic owls - essentially eagles, falcons and owls rolled into one - have a magic of their own. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3815H] Iceman Murder Mystery He's been dead for more than 5,000 years. He's been poked, prodded and probed by scientists for the last 20. And yet today, Otzi the Iceman, the famous mummified corpse pulled from a glacier in the Italian Alps nearly two decades ago, continues to keep many secrets. Now, through an autopsy like no other, scientists attempt to unravel more mysteries from this ancient mummy than ever before, revealing not only the details of Otzi's death, but an entire way of life. How did people live during Otzi's time, the Copper Age? What did we eat? What diseases did we cope with? The answers abound miraculously in this one man's mummified remains. duration 55:17   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Nova scienceNOW [#603] How Smart Can We Get? How do you get a genius brain? Is it all in your DNA? Or is it hard work? Is it possible that everyone's brain has untapped genius - just waiting for the right circumstances so it can be unleashed? From a man who suddenly acquired an extraordinary musical gift after a freak head injury to a "memory athlete" who can remember strings of hundreds of random numbers, David Pogue meets people stretching the boundaries of what the human mind can do. Then, Pogue puts himself to the test: After high-res scanning, he finds out how the anatomy of his brain measures up against the greatest mind of the century - Albert Einstein. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Race 2012 The 2012 presidential election provide Americans the opportunity to write the next chapter in our nation's racial narrative. This documentary uses the presidential election as a lens through which to examine America's increasingly complex racial landscape. With a frank, behind-the-scenes approach, it navigates the high-stakes world of racial pollsters, strategists, spin doctors and candidates as they compete for voters of many ethnic and racial groups. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L
Saturday, October 27, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

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Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too