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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, September 23, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, September 23, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Richard Bangs' Adventures with Purpose Hong Kong: Quest for the Dragon Adventurer Richard Bangs ventures into the heart of Hong Kong to discover what forces drive a city in which the spiritual concept of chi and the worldly concept of wealth coexist. Bangs begins by taking in one of the most dazzling festivals on earth, Chinese New Year. Then, he wanders beneath the skyscrapers of Central District, meanders down the alleys of Western District and ferries across the harbor to Kowloon. Later, he sail the "dragon-infested" waters to the Geopark, an ecological preserve, before making his way to Lantau Island, and finally north, to the villages of the New Territories. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2345H] September 21, 2012 PROP. 32 - Proposition 32 on the November ballot would prohibit employee paycheck deductions from being used for political purposes. Opponents of the ban, including the California Teachers Union, say it is an unfair attempt to restrict their influence, while not placing limitations on spending by wealthy business interests or individuals.
    SAN JOSE CRIME - San Jose, long one of the safest large cities in California, has recently experienced a spike in crime. This week, Police Chief Chris Moore announced his unexpected resignation in January, after two years on the job.
    PUBLIC POWER FOR SAN FRANCISCO - The San Francisco Board of Supervisors has given approval to pave the way for clean public power in San Francisco. Residents would be automatically enrolled in the plan and charged a higher rate than for PG&E, unless they opt out. A similar system is currently in place in Marin County.
    HETCH HETCHY BALLOT MEASURE - If approved by San Francisco voters, Measure F would begin a planning phase for draining and restoring the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir to park land. It is supported by the Sierra Club and other environmental groups. Opponents, including San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and Senators Boxer and Feinstein, say it is a necessary water source and that the region cannot afford the costs.
    Guests: John Myers, KXTV; Robert Solanga, San Jose Mercury News; Tom Vacar, KTVU; and Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    QUEST [#607H] Black Holes/Stanford's Camera Traps Hunt for black holes with NASA's new space telescope that uses X-ray vision to try and unlock the secrets of these invisible space oddities. Then, find out what's being done about the alarming amount of plastic that is collecting in the Pacific Ocean. And, uncover the secret lives of animals through motion-activated cameras at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1105] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Israel & The Palestinian Territories Angela May discovers the diverse and rich food traditions of Israel, with visits to Jaffa, Jerusalem, the coastal city of Acca and the hills of Judea. In the second half of this special, chef Bobby Chinn investigates whether or not there is an authentic Palestinian cuisine as he explores Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethlehem and Ramallah. duration 55:22   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Nature [#2603H] American Eagle Unique to North America, the bald eagle is the continent's most recognizable aerial predator, with a shocking white head, electric yellow beak and penetrating eyes. In the 1960s, this symbol of the United States became an emblem of environmental degradation as the pesticide DDT and other human pressures brought it to the brink of extinction. Following their protection as an endangered species, bald eagles have come roaring back. Photographed by Emmy-winning cinematographer Neil Rettig, this film focuses on the drama of the nest. Even in the best of times, it's a surprisingly tough struggle to maintain a one-ton home and raise chicks until they can hunt on their own. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG
  • 4:00 am
    Nova [#3802#] Making Stuff Stronger From carbon nanotubes to artificial skin, our world is poised at the frontier of a revolution in materials science as far-reaching as the biotech breakthroughs of the last two decades. This series explores how materials changed history and are shaping the future, ranging from cost-effective fuel cells and solar panels to quantum computers and ultra-light automobiles. The New York Times' technology correspondent and best-selling author David Pogue brings his trademark goofball humor and techie zeal to this exploration of the future of "stuff." Each episode explores the talent, luck and determination that can turn a wild idea into a cutting-edge material or high-tech breakthrough.
    This episode: What is the strongest material in the world? Is it iron? Are Kevlar and carbon nanotubes the way of the future, or will the powerful properties discovered in natural spider silk one day replace steel? Nova begins the ambitious four-hour program with a quest for the world's strongest stuff. Host David Pogue helps viewers understand what defines strength, examining everything from mollusks to a toucan's beak and testing the world's strongest materials. Pogue travels from the deck of a US naval aircraft carrier to a demolition derby to the country's top research labs to check in with the experts who are re-engineering what nature has given us to create the next generation of strong "stuff."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 am
    Nova [#3803H] Making Stuff Smaller How small can we go? Could we one day have robots taking "fantastic voyages" in our bodies to kill rogue cells? The triumphs of tiny are seen all around us in the Information Age: transistors, microchips, laptops, cell phones. Now, David Pogue takes Nova viewers to an even smaller world in Making Stuff Smaller, examining the latest in high-powered nano-circuits and microrobots that may one day hold the key to saving lives and creating materials from the ground up, atom by atom. Pogue explores the star materials of small applications, including silicon, the stuff of computer chips, and carbon, the element now being manipulated at the atomic level to produce future technology. "Smaller" and more portable stuff has already revolutionized the way we live. The nanotechnology to come could change the face of medicine, with intelligent pills that know what medicine to release into the body and treat patients from the "inside" based on changing needs; robots that repair damaged body parts; and more. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Need To Know [#254H] America By The Numbers with Maria Hinojosa: Clarkston, Georgia In this NTK Election 2012 special, Maria Hinojosa visits one of the country's most surprisingly diverse communities, a home to residents from more than 40 countries who speak more than 60 languages and dialects. Clarkston, Georgia, a town of 7500 people, was 90% white in the 1980s; today, it is less than 14% white. The program looks at how a rising multicultural population may influence American culture and affect the 2012 presidential election. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 am
    This American Land [#207] Beaver Builders, Wrangling Water, Body Electric, Census in the Smokies Beaver Builders: Beavers are nature's engineers. It turns out they are also good at restoring ailing ecosystems. In eastern Oregon, researchers are doing some extreme fieldwork (snorkeling in rivers and streams in the middle of the night, in the middle of winter!) to learn more about how beaver dams are helping create healthier streams and rivers for salmon, trout, songbirds, and for nearby communities.
    Wrangling Water: Cattle are not the only things being rounded up at some Florida ranches. Residents are also herding water! And it's proving to be a good thing both for the economy and the environment. A pilot program pays ranchers to use their low-lying lands to store water. Water that's captured during the wet season can then be slowly released during dry months into the tributaries of Lake Okeechobee. < br />Body Electric: Ever listen to a fish? It's possible with an electric knifefish! While better known electric eels use electricity to stun their prey, these creatures use electricity to navigate and communicate. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University are intrigued by this sixth "electro sense," and are learning more about how these fish use this tool to find their way around - and locate their next meal.
    Census in the Smokies: This nature audit has been going on for 10 years and gives scientists a good idea about the trends of life in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. A small army of "citizen scientists" help researchers collect specimens, and then analyze their findings.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 am
    QUEST [#607H] Black Holes/Stanford's Camera Traps Hunt for black holes with NASA's new space telescope that uses X-ray vision to try and unlock the secrets of these invisible space oddities. Then, find out what's being done about the alarming amount of plastic that is collecting in the Pacific Ocean. And, uncover the secret lives of animals through motion-activated cameras at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#137H] Elections for Sale One of the reasons Moyers & Company frequently returns to the theme of money and politics is because it's absolutely necessary to do so. Nothing corrupts our political system more than the ability of the rich and influential to spend limitless amounts of money - often in secret - with the intention of creating preferred political outcomes. And far from being a regulator of campaign finances, our political funding laws - aided by a corporate-friendly Supreme Court and self-interested politicians - only facilitate the process of empowering the few while subjugating the many.
    Few understand the ways money moves in and out of our political system than campaign finance reform advocate Trevor Potter. A former chairman of the Federal Election Commission and founding president of the Campaign Legal Center, Potter was Stephen Colbert's chief advisor when Colbert formed his own super PAC and 501 (c)(4) in a clever effort to expose the potential for chicanery behind each.
    This week, Bill and Potter discuss how American elections are bought and sold, who covers the cost, and how the rest of us pay the price. "I can assure you that if someone is spending millions of dollars to elect the candidate, the candidate knows where that money is coming from. There's nothing illegal about telling them, but the voters aren't going to know that," Potter tells Bill. "We're creating opportunities for corruption and candidates being beholden to specific private interests because of funding, yet there's no disclosure to the rest of us."
    Also on the show, a Bill Moyers Essay on the bags of money that campaigns drop on consultants and TV ads to affect and distort your point of view.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#913] Great Investors: Matthew McLennan This week: a next generation "Great Investor" who is successfully filling the shoes of the legendary Jean Marie Eveillard at First Eagle Funds. Matthew McLennan, portfolio manager of First Eagle Global, tells Consuelo Mack where in the world he's finding value now. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#208H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman interviews "Shark Tank" participant Barbara Corcoran on what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur, looks at why people spend thousands of dollars on a portrait and advises a woman from Chicago on remaining positive in the face of so much bad economic news. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2423] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3039] The Real Romney Revealed?; Afghan Insider Attacks Up; Poll Bounce. Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5212H] The political fallout continues following the release of a secretly recorded tape where Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney appears to disparage Americans who receive government assistance. Mr. Romney said that the 47% of Americans who support President Barack Obama think the government should take care of them and that many believe they are "victims." Romney added, "'I'll never convince them that they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.' While he said he regretted his choice of words, Romney went on to say that he knew those "dependent on government" would not vote for him in November.
    In 2008 Barack Obama was also secretly recorded at a private fundraising event. Then candidate-Obama said rural voters in Pennsylvania and other small towns "cling to their guns or religion." The comments were politically embarrassing but happened during the heated primary race against Hillary Clinton not the general election.
    Several new polls show President Obama has a slight edge over Romney among likely voters and a moderate lead in a number of key swing states. But could the candidates' performances at the upcoming presidential debates change the course of the race? Joining Gwen Ifill with insights and analysis of the race for the White House: John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Gloria Borger of CNN, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Sam Youngman of Reuters.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2345H] September 21, 2012 PROP. 32 - Proposition 32 on the November ballot would prohibit employee paycheck deductions from being used for political purposes. Opponents of the ban, including the California Teachers Union, say it is an unfair attempt to restrict their influence, while not placing limitations on spending by wealthy business interests or individuals.
    SAN JOSE CRIME - San Jose, long one of the safest large cities in California, has recently experienced a spike in crime. This week, Police Chief Chris Moore announced his unexpected resignation in January, after two years on the job.
    PUBLIC POWER FOR SAN FRANCISCO - The San Francisco Board of Supervisors has given approval to pave the way for clean public power in San Francisco. Residents would be automatically enrolled in the plan and charged a higher rate than for PG&E, unless they opt out. A similar system is currently in place in Marin County.
    HETCH HETCHY BALLOT MEASURE - If approved by San Francisco voters, Measure F would begin a planning phase for draining and restoring the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir to park land. It is supported by the Sierra Club and other environmental groups. Opponents, including San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and Senators Boxer and Feinstein, say it is a necessary water source and that the region cannot afford the costs.
    Guests: John Myers, KXTV; Robert Solanga, San Jose Mercury News; Tom Vacar, KTVU; and Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#137H] Elections for Sale One of the reasons Moyers & Company frequently returns to the theme of money and politics is because it's absolutely necessary to do so. Nothing corrupts our political system more than the ability of the rich and influential to spend limitless amounts of money - often in secret - with the intention of creating preferred political outcomes. And far from being a regulator of campaign finances, our political funding laws - aided by a corporate-friendly Supreme Court and self-interested politicians - only facilitate the process of empowering the few while subjugating the many.
    Few understand the ways money moves in and out of our political system than campaign finance reform advocate Trevor Potter. A former chairman of the Federal Election Commission and founding president of the Campaign Legal Center, Potter was Stephen Colbert's chief advisor when Colbert formed his own super PAC and 501 (c)(4) in a clever effort to expose the potential for chicanery behind each.
    This week, Bill and Potter discuss how American elections are bought and sold, who covers the cost, and how the rest of us pay the price. "I can assure you that if someone is spending millions of dollars to elect the candidate, the candidate knows where that money is coming from. There's nothing illegal about telling them, but the voters aren't going to know that," Potter tells Bill. "We're creating opportunities for corruption and candidates being beholden to specific private interests because of funding, yet there's no disclosure to the rest of us."
    Also on the show, a Bill Moyers Essay on the bags of money that campaigns drop on consultants and TV ads to affect and distort your point of view.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2423] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3039] The Real Romney Revealed?; Afghan Insider Attacks Up; Poll Bounce. Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2128H] PROTECTING WOMEN'S RIGHTS: The 67th session of the UN General Assembly is tackling gender equality and women's participation in politics and the economy.
    MOTHER GIVES DAUGHTER HER WOMB: The first ever successful uterus transplants may mean two women may now be able to conceive and carry babies to term, thanks to their mothers.
    DOES THE RISE OF WOMEN MEAN "THE END OF MEN?": Journalist Hanna Rosin thinks so. She explains in her new book.
    Panelists:Fox News Political Analyst Angela McGlowan; Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa; Independent Women's Forum Executive Director Sabrina Schaeffer; Democratic Strategist Marjorie Clifton.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#108] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#607H] Black Holes/Stanford's Camera Traps Hunt for black holes with NASA's new space telescope that uses X-ray vision to try and unlock the secrets of these invisible space oddities. Then, find out what's being done about the alarming amount of plastic that is collecting in the Pacific Ocean. And, uncover the secret lives of animals through motion-activated cameras at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#254H] America By The Numbers with Maria Hinojosa: Clarkston, Georgia In this NTK Election 2012 special, Maria Hinojosa visits one of the country's most surprisingly diverse communities, a home to residents from more than 40 countries who speak more than 60 languages and dialects. Clarkston, Georgia, a town of 7500 people, was 90% white in the 1980s; today, it is less than 14% white. The program looks at how a rising multicultural population may influence American culture and affect the 2012 presidential election. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#137H] Elections for Sale One of the reasons Moyers & Company frequently returns to the theme of money and politics is because it's absolutely necessary to do so. Nothing corrupts our political system more than the ability of the rich and influential to spend limitless amounts of money - often in secret - with the intention of creating preferred political outcomes. And far from being a regulator of campaign finances, our political funding laws - aided by a corporate-friendly Supreme Court and self-interested politicians - only facilitate the process of empowering the few while subjugating the many.
    Few understand the ways money moves in and out of our political system than campaign finance reform advocate Trevor Potter. A former chairman of the Federal Election Commission and founding president of the Campaign Legal Center, Potter was Stephen Colbert's chief advisor when Colbert formed his own super PAC and 501 (c)(4) in a clever effort to expose the potential for chicanery behind each.
    This week, Bill and Potter discuss how American elections are bought and sold, who covers the cost, and how the rest of us pay the price. "I can assure you that if someone is spending millions of dollars to elect the candidate, the candidate knows where that money is coming from. There's nothing illegal about telling them, but the voters aren't going to know that," Potter tells Bill. "We're creating opportunities for corruption and candidates being beholden to specific private interests because of funding, yet there's no disclosure to the rest of us."
    Also on the show, a Bill Moyers Essay on the bags of money that campaigns drop on consultants and TV ads to affect and distort your point of view.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5212H] The political fallout continues following the release of a secretly recorded tape where Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney appears to disparage Americans who receive government assistance. Mr. Romney said that the 47% of Americans who support President Barack Obama think the government should take care of them and that many believe they are "victims." Romney added, "'I'll never convince them that they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.' While he said he regretted his choice of words, Romney went on to say that he knew those "dependent on government" would not vote for him in November.
    In 2008 Barack Obama was also secretly recorded at a private fundraising event. Then candidate-Obama said rural voters in Pennsylvania and other small towns "cling to their guns or religion." The comments were politically embarrassing but happened during the heated primary race against Hillary Clinton not the general election.
    Several new polls show President Obama has a slight edge over Romney among likely voters and a moderate lead in a number of key swing states. But could the candidates' performances at the upcoming presidential debates change the course of the race? Joining Gwen Ifill with insights and analysis of the race for the White House: John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Gloria Borger of CNN, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Sam Youngman of Reuters.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2423] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3039] The Real Romney Revealed?; Afghan Insider Attacks Up; Poll Bounce. Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2345H] September 21, 2012 PROP. 32 - Proposition 32 on the November ballot would prohibit employee paycheck deductions from being used for political purposes. Opponents of the ban, including the California Teachers Union, say it is an unfair attempt to restrict their influence, while not placing limitations on spending by wealthy business interests or individuals.
    SAN JOSE CRIME - San Jose, long one of the safest large cities in California, has recently experienced a spike in crime. This week, Police Chief Chris Moore announced his unexpected resignation in January, after two years on the job.
    PUBLIC POWER FOR SAN FRANCISCO - The San Francisco Board of Supervisors has given approval to pave the way for clean public power in San Francisco. Residents would be automatically enrolled in the plan and charged a higher rate than for PG&E, unless they opt out. A similar system is currently in place in Marin County.
    HETCH HETCHY BALLOT MEASURE - If approved by San Francisco voters, Measure F would begin a planning phase for draining and restoring the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir to park land. It is supported by the Sierra Club and other environmental groups. Opponents, including San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and Senators Boxer and Feinstein, say it is a necessary water source and that the region cannot afford the costs.
    Guests: John Myers, KXTV; Robert Solanga, San Jose Mercury News; Tom Vacar, KTVU; and Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#607H] Black Holes/Stanford's Camera Traps Hunt for black holes with NASA's new space telescope that uses X-ray vision to try and unlock the secrets of these invisible space oddities. Then, find out what's being done about the alarming amount of plastic that is collecting in the Pacific Ocean. And, uncover the secret lives of animals through motion-activated cameras at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#106H] A Computer Called Watson Dr. David Ferrucci, IBM Fellow and Principal Investigator of the Watson/Jeopardy project, in conversation with Richard Waters of the Financial Times. duration 53:09   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#137H] Elections for Sale One of the reasons Moyers & Company frequently returns to the theme of money and politics is because it's absolutely necessary to do so. Nothing corrupts our political system more than the ability of the rich and influential to spend limitless amounts of money - often in secret - with the intention of creating preferred political outcomes. And far from being a regulator of campaign finances, our political funding laws - aided by a corporate-friendly Supreme Court and self-interested politicians - only facilitate the process of empowering the few while subjugating the many.
    Few understand the ways money moves in and out of our political system than campaign finance reform advocate Trevor Potter. A former chairman of the Federal Election Commission and founding president of the Campaign Legal Center, Potter was Stephen Colbert's chief advisor when Colbert formed his own super PAC and 501 (c)(4) in a clever effort to expose the potential for chicanery behind each.
    This week, Bill and Potter discuss how American elections are bought and sold, who covers the cost, and how the rest of us pay the price. "I can assure you that if someone is spending millions of dollars to elect the candidate, the candidate knows where that money is coming from. There's nothing illegal about telling them, but the voters aren't going to know that," Potter tells Bill. "We're creating opportunities for corruption and candidates being beholden to specific private interests because of funding, yet there's no disclosure to the rest of us."
    Also on the show, a Bill Moyers Essay on the bags of money that campaigns drop on consultants and TV ads to affect and distort your point of view.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 pm
    Death and the Civil War: American Experience Drawing heavily on This Republic of Suffering, historian and Harvard president Drew Gilpin Faust's acclaimed book, this documentary explores a critical but largely overlooked aspect of the Civil War experience: the immense and varied implications of the war's staggering and unprecedented death toll. The war created a veritable "republic of suffering," as landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted described the wounded and dying arriving at Union hospital ships on the Virginia Peninsula. The shattering death toll transformed hundreds of thousands of individual lives and the life of the nation as well, from its understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship to the profound struggle of a deeply religious culture to reconcile these events with a belief in a benevolent God. The film examines the increasingly lethal years of the war, focusing primarily on several key battles and their corpse-strewn aftermaths, and concludes with a section on the postwar efforts toward reburial and remembrance. It premieres in conjunction with the 150th anniversary of Antietam, the bloodiest one-day battle in American history. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Shiloh: Fiery Trial Compelling recreations and poignant first hand accounts bring to life the Civil War battle author Shelby Foote referred to as "a cauldron of pure hell." Shiloh, fought in south central Tennessee in April 1862, was the first large titanic battle of the war. The Union victory produced the kind of casualties the United States had never experienced, and was a harbinger of the carnage and horror that was to come. The staggering casualties of more than 23-thousand Union and Confederate soldiers sent shockwaves into every home in America,. After Shiloh, it was written, "the South never smiled." duration 46:19   STEREO TVG
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1105] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Israel & The Palestinian Territories Angela May discovers the diverse and rich food traditions of Israel, with visits to Jaffa, Jerusalem, the coastal city of Acca and the hills of Judea. In the second half of this special, chef Bobby Chinn investigates whether or not there is an authentic Palestinian cuisine as he explores Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethlehem and Ramallah. duration 55:22   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Sunday, September 23, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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