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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, August 18, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 18, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31295Z] duration 24:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17230] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10435H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18170H] (broadcast date: 8/17/12)
    a rebroadcast of Charlie Rose Brain Series 2: Schizophrenia
    with Eric Kandel of Columbia University; Danny Hurley; Steven M. Paul of Weill Cornell Medical College; Cornelia Bargmann of Rockefeller University; Judith Rapoport of The National Institute of Mental Health; and David A. Lewis of University of Pittsburgh
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2670Z] (repeat) Tavis talks with R&B singer and O'Jays frontman Eddie Levert. The Rock & Roll Hall of Famer reflects on 50 years with the O'Jays, fatherhood and losing his sons; he also talks about his debut solo album, "I Still Have It". duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31295Z] duration 24:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10435H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#2015] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#432] The End of An Indigenous Tribe In Brazil SHADE TREES AND MANGROVES - Climate change in the South Pacific: The Pacific island nation Vanuatu is running out of time. The indigenous inhabitants are already suffering from floods, cyclones, coastal erosion and water shortages. And climate researchers say the extreme weather will increase and sea levels will continue to rise. Most members of the indigenous population depend on natural resources from farming, forestry and fishing. Now climate change is endangering the livelihoods of the islands' inhabitants. Since 2009, Germany has been funding educational measures for politicians and journalists, and has kick-started several projects for the local rural population. On the main island, Efate, for example, new more robust vegetable varieties are being cultivated, as well as shade trees with nitrogen-fixing properties.
    HUNTED HUNTERS - The Awa indigenous people in the Brazilian rainforest: The Awa have adapted perfectly to life in the forest. But to survive there, they need a large area of intact rainforest. They're always on the move, depending on what fruit is in season and the movements of their prey. A protected area is supposed to protect their traditional way of life. But in reality the remote forests in northern Brazil are beyond the law. Settlers, loggers and pistoleros are pushing ever deeper into Awa territory, destroying the forest and killing the last members of this hunting and gathering people.
    AFRICA ON THE MOVE - Nigeria's modern medicine men: Fatunde Ojo is a traditional healer who lives in Kuruduma, a small suburb of Nigeria's capital Abuja. To find the ingredients for his medicine, he now has to travel long distances. Abuja is growing and the forests have to make way for it. More and more people come here to find work. Fatunde Ojo has to keep up with the times as well. The traditional healers now try to package their remedies professionally, to serve new markets. Fatunde Ono knows his business will suffer if he sticks to old methods. Competition is fierce among the healers. To stay in business, he distributes flyers advertizing his medicine throughout the city.
    ROTTING GRAIN - Scandal in India: Since the financial crisis at the latest, India has been considered a model market economy. The government in Delhi expects 9% growth in 2012. But that doesn't mean fewer people are suffering from hunger and malnutrition. At the same time millions of tons of rice and grain are rotting in the open air. In Punjab alone, a region in the north of the country, more than 100,000 sacks are stored. The grain is rotting and no longer fit for human consumption. The stench is unbearable and vermin are spreading. The fermenting goods are given to wine growers to distil spirits and to livestock breeders as fodder. In the meantime, food prices rose by 60% last year.
    duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3032] A Duel for Matterhorn Tourists SPAIN: GROWING FURY - Spain's government has instituted harsh austerity measures in exchange for aid from its European partners. Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is aiming to slash 65 billion euros from the budget - and low-income and middle-class workers are being hit particularly hard.
    BULGARIA/GREECE: BABY TRAFFICKING - A black market trade is flourishing on the border of Greece and Bulgaria. Desperate and disadvantaged young mothers are selling their newborns to buyers in Greece. Aid organizations estimate that 1 in every 2 mothers living in Bulgaria's poorest urban neighborhoods is selling their children across the border.
    SWITZERLAND: THE MATTERHORN - The Matterhorn looms above the Swiss ski resort town Zermatt. It's a popular tourist attraction, but it's causing trouble for the neighboring town, Saas Fee. As one of the highest peaks in the Alps, the Matterhorn is one of Switzerland's national symbols. It also serves as a dramatic backdrop and a tourist magnet for the town of Zermatt. But the neighboring town of Saas Fee says the Matterhorn is a source of problems: the iconic mountain is blocked from view in Saas Fee, and the town says it sees fewer tourists and less revenue as a result. Officials there have proposed blasting through the view-blocking rock, and now they're discussing a complicated cable car project. But Zermatt has swatted down every last plan. Journeys in Europe:
    NORWAY: A PILGRIMAGE ROUTE GOES ECUMENICAL - There are several St Olav Ways and they all lead to the shrine of St Olav in Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim. Taken together, the pilgrimage routes, which crisscross Scandinavia, are 5000 kilometers in length. St Olav was a king of Norway a thousand years ago who did much to Christianize the country.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1551Z] CATHOLICS AND PAUL RYAN - "I do not believe that the preferential option for the poor means a preferential option for big government," said Republican vice presidential candidate and Roman Catholic Paul Ryan in a recent lecture at Georgetown University. How might Catholic social teaching influence this year's campaign and election? (new segment)
    INDIA SURROGATES - In what has become a lucrative industry, clinics in India recruit impoverished women and pay them as much as $7000 to be implanted with embryos and bear children for infertile clients. As Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, some clinics implant 4 or 5 embryos to maximize the chance of pregnancy, and in cases where multiple embryos become viable pregnancies, some are aborted. University of Pennsylvania ethicist Arthur Caplan worries about where this could lead. (Originally aired September 30, 2011) < br />MORMON SINGLES CHAPEL - Leaders of the Church of Latter Day Saints say more and more young Mormons are postponing marriage for their careers or simply staying single longer. Lucky Severson reports on the Mormon Church's Crystal City Chapel in the suburbs of Washington DC, all of whose members are single, and the Church's efforts to reverse the trend by encouraging single Mormons to meet and marry. (Originally aired August 19, 2011)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#132H] Confronting The Contradictions of America's Past Learning from our racial past is crucial to addressing America's current ethnic tensions, but only if we confront key historical contradictions. In an encore broadcast, Khalil Muhammad helps bring these issues to light. Muhammad heads the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and is the author of The Condemnation of Blackness, which connects American histories of race, crime and the making of urban America to modern headlines. duration 52:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2418] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5207H] Mitt Romney's decision to pick Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate seems to have energized conservatives and even excited many liberals. The 7-term lawmaker is best known for his dramatic proposal to cut and transform government health and income security programs to balance the budget. Democrats believe Ryan exemplifies the distinct election-year choice voters will have to make between the Republican and Democratic visions about the size and role of the federal government.
    On the presidential campaign trail the rhetoric seemed to get louder and angrier as both candidates launched bus tours in key battleground states. During a 3-day trip to Iowa President Barack Obama talked about the need for drought relief and touted the benefits of renewable energy. Mitt Romney traveled to coal-rich eastern Ohio to talk about the importance of coal as one of the ways to make the US energy independent.
    Ryan faced tough questions about his proposed plan to reform Medicare which he says will protect and strengthen the program. The Obama campaign insists "it will end Medicare as we know it."
    But the debate over energy policy and Medicare was overshadowed by a firestorm Vice President Joe Biden ignited with his controversial comments suggesting Romney would put Americans "in chains."
    Is this negative war of words and remarkably nasty tone coming from both camps what voters can expect for the next 3 months until Election Day? Or will the upcoming conventions force both campaigns to refocus their attention to jobs, the weak economy, and a continuing war in Afghanistan?
    We will get analysis on the 2012 presidential race from Jackie Calmes of The New York Times, John Harris of Politico, and Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2341H] August 17, 2012 NEWSMAKER INTERVIEWS - PETE WILSON AND ANTONIO VILLARAIGOSA - Former California Governor Pete Wilson and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa talk with Belva Davis and San Francisco Chronicle political writer Carla Marinucci. Wilson is heading up the state's Republican delegation to the GOP convention in Tampa and Villaraigosa is chairman of the Democratic national convention in Charlotte. We'll get their thoughts on the presidential race and on issues of importance to California voters.
    NEWS PANEL:
    DEFERRED DEPORTATION FOR UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS - On Wednesday, the federal government launched a controversial program which would allow more than one million undocumented immigrants to live and work in the US legally, for 2 years. The program is open to people between the ages of 15 and 31 and who meet certain requirements, including continuous residency in the U.S. for the past 5 years.
    SF ETHICS COMMISSION AND ROSS MIRKARIMI - An Ethics Commission met one last time at San Francisco City Hall to hear closing arguments in the case against Ross Mirkarimi who has been suspended since March from his job as sheriff after he pleaded guilty to a domestic violence-related charge against his wife. This is the first time that the 5-member commission has been convened to determine if an elected official can be removed from office.
    Guests: Carla Marinucci, Rachel Gordon, and Matthai Kuruvila, San Francisco Chronicle.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    Seeking Water from the Sun This documentary takes viewers on a journey into the drama of scientific innovation and the harsh reality of life without water. It ventures into university laboratories and across the Navajo reservation to explore a way of life that revolves around water - and its scarcity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2123H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3034] Paul Ryan's Run, Joe Biden Unchained, Deportations Deferred. Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#249H] OBESITY IN THE CITY - NTK examines high obesity and diabetes rates among children in poor, inner-city communities and describes the New York City health department's campaign to reverse the trend.
    INTERVIEW: ROSS HAMMOND - Anchor Scott Simon interviews Ross Hammond of the Brookings Institute to get his take on whether or not the federal government can help solve the nation's obesity epidemic.
    AMERICAN VOICES - This week's essay is by entrepreneur Haile Johnston, who helps provides fresh food to residents of inner city Philadelphia.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#132H] Confronting The Contradictions of America's Past Learning from our racial past is crucial to addressing America's current ethnic tensions, but only if we confront key historical contradictions. In an encore broadcast, Khalil Muhammad helps bring these issues to light. Muhammad heads the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and is the author of The Condemnation of Blackness, which connects American histories of race, crime and the making of urban America to modern headlines. duration 52:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    This American Land [#203] Ferrets and Prairie Dogs, Hidden Gems, Follow the Water, Island Fires Ferrets and Prairie Dogs: After being nearly wiped out in the early 20th century, the black- footed ferret is making a comeback. It's taken a complicated conservation effort and a captive breeding program to restore this species to the Great Plains. The health of the ferret is tied directly to the success of prairie dogs- animals that have also had plenty of run-ins with humans. Keeping these two playful, adorable species in good shape is also helping save 130 unique plants and animals in this North American prairie ecosystem. < br />Hidden Gems: Whether you are a hiker, skier, or mountain biker, there is plenty to treasure in an area of the Rocky Mountains known as Hidden Gems. A plan that's been 11 years in the making would protect this area as wilderness, creating more habitat corridors for wildlife and protecting these areas from development, motorized vehicles, and unauthorized trail-building. Supporters have worked hard to make sure that the needs of all outdoor lovers are considered. Join us as we hit the trails!
    Follow the Water: If scientists want to understand drought, floods, and water supplies, they have to follow the water-every drop of it! At Penn State University, researchers are documenting the flow of water, using tools like infrared lasers and other sophisticated sensors. But to get all the data they need there's some old-fashioned skills necessary too, like climbing trees to collect leaves and branches. These water sleuths will be able to help planners predict changes triggered by accelerating climate change.
    Island Fires: Martha's Vineyard is known for water, not fire. That's why some might be surprised that "prescribed burns," a few dozen acres at a time, really boil down to good ecological housekeeping. Ridding areas of the island of flammable shrubbery before it ignites by itself is actually a good way to re-charge the landscape. The ash that's left behind from the fire is a natural fertilizer, giving plants lots of energy. And those controlled burns also give residents peace of mind.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    Seeking Water from the Sun This documentary takes viewers on a journey into the drama of scientific innovation and the harsh reality of life without water. It ventures into university laboratories and across the Navajo reservation to explore a way of life that revolves around water - and its scarcity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1413] J. Harvie Wilkinson, III - "Cosmic Constitutional Theory: Why Americans Are Losing Their Inalienable Right to Self- J. Harvie Wildinson, III was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit by Ronald Reagan. He has served on that court since 1984 and as its Chief Judge from 1996 to 2003. He has been frequently on the short list of prospects for the Supreme Court and is regarded as one of the nation's premier appellate jurists. He is also the author of "From Brown to Bakke: The Supreme Court and School Integration, 1954-1978." duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Nixon's The One: How Tricky Dick Stole The Sixties...and Changed America Forever Narrated by Dick Cavett, this program chronicles not only Richard Nixon's stunning victory in the 1968 presidential race, but the ways in which that historic election gave rise to Red State-Blue State America. Combining archival footage and original interviews with, among others, activist Tom Hayden, former Nixon advisor Kevin Phillips, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and historian David Maraniss, and bestselling author Rick Perlstein, it is anything but a nostalgic trip through the "flower power" decade. Rather, it's a sobering, wry look at how the Sixties divided us-and how Nixon stepped into the breach to claim the biggest prize of all. duration 53:25   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Aristide and the Endless Revolution A complex historical truth emerges in Nicolas Rossier's intelligent examination revealing the oft suppressed story of the 2004 coup d'etat in Haiti, as well as the systematic violence and human rights violations that erupted under the interim government. An interview with the deposed president, Jean-Bertranc Aristide in Pretoria, South Africa, is juxtaposed with the views of a wider range of supporters and critics, including US Assistant Secretary of State Roger Noriega. It is not Aristide and the Lavalas supporters who emerge looking like thugs but international interests concerned with suppressing popular democracy and ending the reforms Aristide was capable of making - despite embargoes and the need to service a debt for loans Haiti never received. History repeats itself in Haiti in 2004 in that the former parish priest had already been deposed as president in 1991 with CIA support. His kidnapping marked the fourth American intervention into Haiti in 90 years. This was also not the first intervention by France. In 1801, Napoleon had the leader of free Haiti Toussaint L'Ouverture, seized and deported to prison in France where he died. While faced with the strangulation of aid, Aristide had begun a campaign for reparations. This provocative investigation draws out the central place of international history in Haiti's poverty. The film features an exclusive interview with Jean-Bertrand Aristide and other great personalities such as Dr. Paul Farmer, Assistant Secretary of State Roger Noriega, John Shattuck, Gerald Latortue, Maxine Waters, Dr. Jeffrey Sachs, Laennec Hurbon, Guire Poulard, Noam Chomsky, Timothey Carney, Orlando Marville, Kim Ives, Rav Laforest, Brian Concannon, Mario Dupay, Danny Glover, James Dobbins, Claude Moise and many other Haitian voices. duration 58:59   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Designing Healthy Communities [#103] Social Policy In Concrete Dr. Jackson believes it is every citizen's right to live in a clean, healthy environment. This isn't the case for many low-income neighborhoods, built near big transportation hubs and former industrial cities like Oakland, CA and Detroit, Michigan. We meet a morbidly obese grandmother struggling to raise 7 grandchildren, all of whom have asthma from living near the Port of Oakland. Parts of the city of Detroit resemble abandoned war zones. Yet hope blossoms in both. Health officials, community activists and a new breed of young Urban Pioneers are working to fix their cities by transforming urban wilderness and food deserts into inspirational new models for other troubled, urban communities. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3034] Paul Ryan's Run, Joe Biden Unchained, Deportations Deferred. Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5207H] Mitt Romney's decision to pick Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate seems to have energized conservatives and even excited many liberals. The 7-term lawmaker is best known for his dramatic proposal to cut and transform government health and income security programs to balance the budget. Democrats believe Ryan exemplifies the distinct election-year choice voters will have to make between the Republican and Democratic visions about the size and role of the federal government.
    On the presidential campaign trail the rhetoric seemed to get louder and angrier as both candidates launched bus tours in key battleground states. During a 3-day trip to Iowa President Barack Obama talked about the need for drought relief and touted the benefits of renewable energy. Mitt Romney traveled to coal-rich eastern Ohio to talk about the importance of coal as one of the ways to make the US energy independent.
    Ryan faced tough questions about his proposed plan to reform Medicare which he says will protect and strengthen the program. The Obama campaign insists "it will end Medicare as we know it."
    But the debate over energy policy and Medicare was overshadowed by a firestorm Vice President Joe Biden ignited with his controversial comments suggesting Romney would put Americans "in chains."
    Is this negative war of words and remarkably nasty tone coming from both camps what voters can expect for the next 3 months until Election Day? Or will the upcoming conventions force both campaigns to refocus their attention to jobs, the weak economy, and a continuing war in Afghanistan?
    We will get analysis on the 2012 presidential race from Jackie Calmes of The New York Times, John Harris of Politico, and Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2341H] August 17, 2012 NEWSMAKER INTERVIEWS - PETE WILSON AND ANTONIO VILLARAIGOSA - Former California Governor Pete Wilson and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa talk with Belva Davis and San Francisco Chronicle political writer Carla Marinucci. Wilson is heading up the state's Republican delegation to the GOP convention in Tampa and Villaraigosa is chairman of the Democratic national convention in Charlotte. We'll get their thoughts on the presidential race and on issues of importance to California voters.
    NEWS PANEL:
    DEFERRED DEPORTATION FOR UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS - On Wednesday, the federal government launched a controversial program which would allow more than one million undocumented immigrants to live and work in the US legally, for 2 years. The program is open to people between the ages of 15 and 31 and who meet certain requirements, including continuous residency in the U.S. for the past 5 years.
    SF ETHICS COMMISSION AND ROSS MIRKARIMI - An Ethics Commission met one last time at San Francisco City Hall to hear closing arguments in the case against Ross Mirkarimi who has been suspended since March from his job as sheriff after he pleaded guilty to a domestic violence-related charge against his wife. This is the first time that the 5-member commission has been convened to determine if an elected official can be removed from office.
    Guests: Carla Marinucci, Rachel Gordon, and Matthai Kuruvila, San Francisco Chronicle.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Seeking Water from the Sun This documentary takes viewers on a journey into the drama of scientific innovation and the harsh reality of life without water. It ventures into university laboratories and across the Navajo reservation to explore a way of life that revolves around water - and its scarcity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1102] West Texas Zay Harding starts his journey in Austin, where he explores everything from rattlesnake hotdogs to bingo with chickens. He then heads south to San Antonio for a visit to the Alamo. Following a night in the most haunted hotel in Texas, Zay travels to the border city of El Paso. After meeting the locals, he treks into the surrounding desert to travel along the old Butterfield trail. Traveling in a 1960s Mustang, Zay embarks on a road trip along Route 66 where he takes in the stunning Palo Duro Canyon, competes in Amarillo's steak-eating challenge and concludes his trip in Glenrio, the mysterious ghost town that borders New Mexico. duration 57:45   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2411H] Dogs That Changed The World, Pt. 1 - The Rise of the Dog From the tiniest Chihuahua to the largest St. Bernard, all dogs claim the wolf as their ancestor. Using DNA analysis and other research, scientists have now pieced together the puzzle of canine evolution, creating a fascinating picture of some of the essential dogs vital to the canine population. Part one chronicles the evolution of dogs and how they infiltrated human society. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG
  • 10:00 pm
    Atchafalaya Houseboat Experiences of Gwen Roland and her companion, Calvin Voisin, who left civilization in the turmoil of the early 1970s the return to the simple, quiet lifestyle of their great-grandparents in the vast, unspoiled beauty of the nation's largest river swamp, Louisiana Atchafalaya Basin. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:30 pm
    Echoes of a Lost Valley Travel deep into California's past to its geological birth. See the plants, the animals and the Native Californians who thrived for hundreds of years before the first European explorers laid eyes on the Central Valley. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Biz Kid$ -- Three Minutes to Change The World 4 Kids from Around the Globe. 4 Ideas to Change the World. 3 Minutes to Sell Their Stories.
    Who wins? Find out in this special from the producers of public television's award-winning financial literacy series. Follow the 4 semi-finalists of the "Staples Ashoka Youth Social Entrepreneur Competition" and learn about their lives, passions, joys, and hardships as they work on projects to change the world. The goal of the project? Inspire people of all ages to use innovation and technology to bring about change in their communities.
    CANADA - Eden invented the SunSaluter, a solar power rotation system that increases the amount of energy captured by up to 40%. She traveled to Kenya, where she assembled and installed solar stations in villages that previously were without electricity. Her vision? Eden's goal is to electrify the developing world and to push solar technology to the forefront of the alternative energy effort throughout the developed world.
    INDIA - Using the power of social networks, Karthik developed a program to connect blood donors to those who need it most. In India, individual patients are responsible for locating blood donors prior to their surgeries. After meeting an inspiring four-year-old with a rare medical condition, and learning about chronic blood shortages, Karthik created Socialblood. org. His vision? Deploy localized versions of Socialblood.org around the world where similar problems exist.
    UNITED STATES - Vineet created Anjna Patient Education, an interactive health education program designed for use by patients and doctors based in free clinics in high-need areas. His vision? Vineet's goal is to empower patients to achieve stronger and healthier lives by increasing access to quality health education programs and reducing the rates of chronic, preventable disease.
    SINGAPORE - Using the waste emissions from a power plant, Vivek found a new, inexpensive way to create carbon nanotubes, a valuable element for strengthening products such as steel, rubber, and aluminum. The nanotubes, which are produced by his company Damascus Fortune, make steel and other products 10 times stronger than usual. Vivek's company also makes high performance batteries using the nanotubes. His vision? Reduce the environmental impact of carbon emissions by converting waste into carbon nanotubes for use in electronics, optics, and other fields of materials science.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 12:00 am
    Richard Bangs' Adventures with Purpose "Greece: Quest for the Gods" Ancient Greece produced one of humankind's most extraordinary period of cultural and intellectual transformation. From this prolific era sprang the very essence of Western civilization: poetry and architecture, the sciences and a democratic form of government. Essential to this revolution of human thought stood the powerful and revered deities of Greek mythology. They touched every aspect of life and influenced every action; yet somehow, they vanished from modern cosmology, leaving behind only temples, ruins, and a collection of strange but magnificent stories. In the seventh installment of his ADVENTURES WITH PURPOSE series of travel specials, renowned adventurer Richard Bangs embarks on a great odyssey through Greece to discover the meaning and relevance of Greek mythology today. Richard begins his time-travels in Athens, and then heads to Olympia, the birthplace of the Olympic Games. He visits the island of Ithaca, the site of the mystical oracles at Delphi, and finishes his journey at the home of the gods, Mt. Olympus. Joining Richard is author Agapi Stassinopolous and Greece native Arianna Huffington. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
Saturday, August 18, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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