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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, August 4, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 4, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31285Z] Surprisingly strong news on the nation's job market put stock investors in a buying mood. NBR's Susie Gharib speaks with JPMorgan's Chief Global Economist Bruce Kasman U.S. factories are having a tough time finding skilled workers as baby boomers prepare for retirement. NBR Chicago Correspondent Diane Eastabrook visits one firm that's training the next generation of workers. And, we wrap up our week long look at small banks and how some are finding their way by finding their niche. NBR New York Correspondent Erika Miller has details. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17216] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10425H] For The US Economy, A Mixed Jobs Report * Potential Defense Cuts Take Center Stage * Shields And Brooks * Looking Ahead To A New Rover's Exploration Of Mars * For David Pogue, Twitter Leads The Way To A Lost iPhone duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18160H] (original broadcast date: 08/03/12)
    an appreciation of Gore Vidal, who died on Tuesday from complications of pneumonia.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2660Z] (repeat) Tavis talks with singer-songwriter Shawn Colvin. The multiple Grammy winner talks about her new CD, "All Fall Down," and her candid new memoir, Diamond in the Rough, and reveals what she uses as her healing factors during times of clinical depression. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31285Z] Surprisingly strong news on the nation's job market put stock investors in a buying mood. NBR's Susie Gharib speaks with JPMorgan's Chief Global Economist Bruce Kasman U.S. factories are having a tough time finding skilled workers as baby boomers prepare for retirement. NBR Chicago Correspondent Diane Eastabrook visits one firm that's training the next generation of workers. And, we wrap up our week long look at small banks and how some are finding their way by finding their niche. NBR New York Correspondent Erika Miller has details. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10425H] For The US Economy, A Mixed Jobs Report * Potential Defense Cuts Take Center Stage * Shields And Brooks * Looking Ahead To A New Rover's Exploration Of Mars * For David Pogue, Twitter Leads The Way To A Lost iPhone duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#2005] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#430] Cuba Tries Rebuilding A Slum to Attract Tourists AFRICA ON THE MOVE: OYSTER FARMING IN SENEGAL - Many people in Senegal depend on agriculture and aquaculture to make a living - with most of those involved working illegally. The country's economy has suffered from both chronic mismanagement and the effects of extreme weather - meaning hunger is a major concern for the population. People living along the Casamance River depend on rice production and logging for their livelihood. Now, one initiative is looking to help women earn a living via oyster farming - and protect the mangrove forest. With the help of a small loan, the project's leader Seynabou Diatta is pursuing an environmentally friendly way to harvest oysters.
    BANGLADESH: ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE - Bangladesh is one of the poorest countries in the world - and people here are among those suffering the most from the effects of climate change. Large swathes of land have been ruined through excessive shrimp farming - leaving too much salt in the soil. Women have been hardest hit by the problem. Sharmind Neelormi and Ahsan Achmed from the Centre for Global Change (CGC) help support a series of village committees in southeastern Bangladesh. The salty soil here is barely arable during the dry season. CGC is supporting efforts to promote sustainable crab farming and to plant salt-resistant varieties of rice. Through these projects, women are helping raise environmental consciousness in a patriarchal society.
    CUBA: A NEW FACE FOR OLD HOMES - Since assuming power, Fidel Castro's younger brother, Raul, has gradually started implementing liberal economic reforms. One reason is the 2.5 million tourists Cuba attracts each year. That's underscored the need to give crumbling building facades in the Cuban capital Havana a facelift. Havanna's historic center with its colonial-era buildings has significant architectural appeal. The city's charm is a major money-maker - and among the political changes being made is the liberalization of the real estate market. As of November, real estate can be bought and sold in Cuba, for the first time since the revolution. Global 3000 takes a look at the dilapidated state of most buildings in the capital - and the efforts being made to renovate them and create new places to live.
    duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3030] Britain's Middle Class Fights Back RUSSIA: PUNKS IN CHURCH - Feminist punk-rockers called on the Virgin Mary to chase Putin out. Now they are in jail. Members of the Pussy Riot collective held a surprise performance in Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior in February. Three women alleged to have taken part were arrested and have been refused bail. They are to be tried on hooliganism charges because of their protest, pointing out the close ties between the Kremlin and the Russian Orthodox Church. The story is causing quite a stir as it addresses many issues troubling Russia. Human rights activists are furious at what they consider a political trial.
    FRANCE: AMERICAN VILLAGES - Val d'Europe is an artificial development just outside Paris - a picture-book village, thought up by the Walt Disney Company and missing just one thing: life. In 1987, when Disney signed a contract with the French government on building Disneyland Paris, its subsidiary running the site set an additional condition. It stipulated that it would have a say in town planning in the surrounding area. What resulted was a model village in pastel tones reminiscent of Barbie doll houses. Everything is neat and tidy and utterly sterile. Val d'Europe is said to have 33,000 residents, most of them young families. But its empty streets most resemble those of a ghost town.
    BRITAIN: THE MIDDLE CLASS FIGHTS BACK - In the financial crisis, Britain's middle classes are making themselves heard again. Citizens' action groups are running pubs threatened with closure and taking over libraries local councils no longer want to fund. Neo-liberalism became a dominant force in Britain in the late 1970s and the 1980s. The later return to power of the Labour Party did very little to change its affects on the country's economy. Now, however, a counter-movement is spreading to increasing numbers of traditionally middle-class villages: the cooperative movement. It includes cooperative societies, volunteer work and people's banks. Some communities are planting food crops together and sharing the harvest. This time, ideas that originated with hippies in the late1960s are being put into action by the middle classes.
    NETHERLANDS: SQUATTERS VERSUS ANTI-SQUATTERS - Squatting in uninhabited buildings has actually been illegal in the Netherlands since 2010. Property owners who want to play it safe are offering lodging to anti-squatters, who usually have to pay only water, electricity and gas costs and be prepared to vacate the premises at very short notice. The service is also attractive to students who are more conservative in their convictions and have little sympathy for the squatting movement. The competition is, of course, extremely annoying for real squatters.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1549Z] SHARIAH CONTROVERSY - A debate is under way over banning US courts from considering Islamic religious law in their decision-making. "It targets one community, one faith," says Naeem Baig, vice president for public affairs of the Islamic Circle of North America, of proposed legislation to ban US state courts from considering shariah. "It is to create this fear of Islam and Muslims in the larger society. "
    EPISCOPAL-TO-CATHOLIC CONVERTS - Why did St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Bladensburg, Maryland choose to join the Catholic Church? "The theology of Rome, the authority of Rome - that was appealing to us," says Father Mark Lewis. St. Luke's was the first US Episcopal church to join the Catholic Church under new Vatican rules.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#130H] Suppressing The Vote * The fight against voter fraud is a solution in search of a problem - documented instances of voter fraud these days are surprisingly few. Nevertheless, since the 2010 midterm elections, new election laws passed by Republican-dominated legislatures in 14 states have sought to limit voter registration or require photo IDs in order to vote - identification that for many is too expensive or otherwise difficult to obtain. Such laws, according to a recent report from the Brennan Center for Justice "will make it harder for hundreds of thousands of poor Americans to vote." That's why some say the real goal isn't about fighting voter fraud; it's about enabling voter suppression. < br />This week, Bill talks to Keesha Gaskins, an attorney and co-author of that report, and Michael Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice, about modern efforts to keep minorities and the poor in particular from exercising one of the most fundamental American rights. "When these votes come under attack by this level of partisan gamesmanship, it's completely inappropriate and antithetical to our history," Gaskins tells Bill. "This is a very real political issue, but beyond that, this is a real issue of real Americans being able to access and be self-determinative in how we're governed."
    * Also on the program, Bill talks with Anthony Baxter, director of You've Been Trumped!, an upcoming documentary about Donald Trump's aggressive efforts to build "the greatest golf course in the world" along ancient sand dunes on the coast of Scotland. A veteran journalist, Baxter says what Trump and even local media are hailing an economic boon is actually a disaster threatening the environment and callously disrupting peoples' lives - a perfect example of capitalism run amuck, and how the rest of us pay the price. "It seems to me there's one rule for the super-rich and one rule for everybody else," Baxter says. "And the 99% of people in the world are tired and fed up of having money and power riding roughshod over their lives and our planet. Our planet, I don't think, can afford these kinds of decisions."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2416] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5205H] * Mitt Romney returned to the campaign trail on Thursday following a week-long overseas trip that generated a lot of controversy. New polls show the presumptive Republican nominee has lost ground in Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida where President Obama leads. Amy Walter of ABC News will have a report on how President Obama and Mitt Romney are both working to energize their campaigns ahead of their party's political conventions and the concentrated efforts both candidates are making to win independent voters in battleground states.
    * Republicans are talking about the Tea Party's big victory in Texas Tuesday night when former state solicitor general Ted Cruz upset Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst in the Republican runoff for the US Senate. Cruz, who has never been elected to public office, heads into the November election as the favorite to replace retiring Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the influence the Tea Party and other grassroots conservative groups are having on establishment Republicans and the 2012 elections.
    * David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will have analysis of the July unemployment numbers due out Friday and the state of the economic recovery. Plus he'll explain why the budget process on Capitol Hill has grown wildly out of control as he reports in his new book, Red Ink: Inside the High-Stakes Politics of the Federal Budget.
    * This week Congress approved a stop-gap measure to avoid a government shutdown but left a number of bills unfinished ahead of its August recess. Susan Davis of USA Today will report on some of the pending legislation including an overhaul of the US Postal Service, an extension of agriculture subsidies, the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, and the administration backed Cybersecurity Act to protect the nation's electrical grid and water supply.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2339H] August 3, 2012 CPMC PLANS ON HOLD: Plans to build a new hospital in San Francisco at Cathedral Hill, currently home to several churches, and to rebuild St. Luke's in the Mission District, are on hold until November. The Board of Supervisors put the decision on the backburner while questions about an escape clause that would allow the hospital to be closed based on weak financial performance by the company raises a red flag.
    DROUGHT DRIVING UP FOOD PRICES: The drought gripping more than half the country is driving up food prices - including milk, beef, chicken and pork - due to the scorching heat and minimal rainfall. Drought is affecting over 80% of the county's corn crops. Consumers can expect to pay 3% to 4% more for groceries next year. < br />MARS ROVER LANDING: Excitement is more than sky high over a large rover that NASA is gearing up to land on Mars Sunday night. The 1-ton Curiosity will feed vivid images of the Red Planet back to Earth and work to find evidence of microbial life.
    Guests: Rachel Gordon, San Francisco Chronicle; Tom Vacar, KTVU; and Lisa Krieger, San Jose Mercury News.
    "JANE DOE" OF YOUR BLACK MUSLIM BAKERY: On the fifth year anniversary of the killing of Oakland journalist Chauncey Bailey by members of Your Black Muslim Bakery, the woman who exposed bakery owner Yusuf Bey Sr. for acts of sexual abuse, welfare fraud and violence has come forward. Previously identified as Jane Doe #1, Kowana Banks tells her personal story of abuse to Center for Investigative Reporting journalist Louise Rafkin. The story was reported in collaboration with the Chauncey Bailey Project. Belva Davis interviews Rafkin and Banks.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    QUEST [#501H] Track Elephant Seals/Life On Mars Meet scientists tracking elephant seals along San Mateo County's' coast and search for life on Mars with NASA's new rover. Your Videos on QUEST highlights an excerpt of Bay Area filmmaker Joshua Cassidy's short film, Life by the Tide. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2121H] HEALTH CARE CHANGES: There were celebrations, caution and concern as new provisions that benefit women kick in as part of the Affordable Care Act.
    MALE BOSS SURPRISE: Male bosses may discriminate against female employees if they have stay-at-home wives, a new study indicates. But, most of them don't know they're doing it.
    FEMALE DEBATE MODERATOR: No woman moderator a Presidential Debate since 1992? That's what 3 high schoolers found out and they say they want to change that - and they just might succeed.
    Panelists: Feminist Majority Foundation's Kim Gandy;The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood; Global Summit of Women President Irene Natividad; Conservative Policy Analyst Shelby Emmett.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3032] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#247H] CHICAGO INFRASTRUCTURE: NTK reports on Chicago's crumbling infrastructure and Mayor Rahm Emanuel's controversial plan to fix it by partnering with private businesses in lieu of raising taxes.
    INTERVIEW: ED RENDELL: Ray Suarez interviews the former Governor of Pennsylvania about whether or not Chicago's infrastructure plan may be scaled for use in other cities.
    AMERICAN VOICES: GARRETT EBLING: A survivor of the 1-35 bridge collapse in Minneapolis in 2007, Ebling talks about the need to raise awareness about the nation's infrastructure woes.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#130H] Suppressing The Vote * The fight against voter fraud is a solution in search of a problem - documented instances of voter fraud these days are surprisingly few. Nevertheless, since the 2010 midterm elections, new election laws passed by Republican-dominated legislatures in 14 states have sought to limit voter registration or require photo IDs in order to vote - identification that for many is too expensive or otherwise difficult to obtain. Such laws, according to a recent report from the Brennan Center for Justice "will make it harder for hundreds of thousands of poor Americans to vote." That's why some say the real goal isn't about fighting voter fraud; it's about enabling voter suppression. < br />This week, Bill talks to Keesha Gaskins, an attorney and co-author of that report, and Michael Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice, about modern efforts to keep minorities and the poor in particular from exercising one of the most fundamental American rights. "When these votes come under attack by this level of partisan gamesmanship, it's completely inappropriate and antithetical to our history," Gaskins tells Bill. "This is a very real political issue, but beyond that, this is a real issue of real Americans being able to access and be self-determinative in how we're governed."
    * Also on the program, Bill talks with Anthony Baxter, director of You've Been Trumped!, an upcoming documentary about Donald Trump's aggressive efforts to build "the greatest golf course in the world" along ancient sand dunes on the coast of Scotland. A veteran journalist, Baxter says what Trump and even local media are hailing an economic boon is actually a disaster threatening the environment and callously disrupting peoples' lives - a perfect example of capitalism run amuck, and how the rest of us pay the price. "It seems to me there's one rule for the super-rich and one rule for everybody else," Baxter says. "And the 99% of people in the world are tired and fed up of having money and power riding roughshod over their lives and our planet. Our planet, I don't think, can afford these kinds of decisions."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    This American Land [#201] Critical Colorado, Checkups for Manatees, Appalachian Forests The Colorado River brings drinking water, irrigation, recreation and livelihood to millions of people in the West. But it's clear now that there's not an unlimited supply of this precious resource. Business owners on and near the river are working to make sure their neighbors, and policy makers in Washington, get a complete picture of how critical this river is. Traveling through Arizona and northern Mexico, Bruce Burkhardt shows us there's a lot that needs to be done to protect these waters now and for the future.
    Different hikers get different inspiration from the Cherokee National Forest in Tennessee. An artist takes photos that she will later paint; a woodworker studies how trees grow to get ideas for the furniture he builds; and a retired Marine gives back to his community by clearing fallen limbs from the trail. They all support a Congressional designation of this beautiful area as wilderness, so it will be preserved from development for future generations. From the amphibians to the wildflowers to the fishes the array of diversity in the southern Appalachian forest is just astounding!
    Shy, smart, curious and vulnerable: Manatees are slow-moving marine mammals that have not had it easy in recent decades. Diseases and red tide, but mostly strikes from boats and propellers, have killed and injured hundreds of them. Both Florida and federal authorities are stepping up protection of manatees, especially in their winter sanctuaries on the state's west coast. Veterinarians and volunteers conduct physicals on these gentle giants to gauge their health and long- term outlook. Our host Caroline Raville swims with some manatees to bring us the story!
    Removing a dam can cause big changes to a community, and to the environment. Before cities make the decision to take down a dam that's either deteriorating or no longer needed, they must be prepared. Researchers at Dartmouth College use sophisticated tools to study river systems to help predict what will happen when the dam is gone. It's all about "shoring up" what we know about how rivers flow, in order to make smart choices when it is time for a dam to come down.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    QUEST [#501H] Track Elephant Seals/Life On Mars Meet scientists tracking elephant seals along San Mateo County's' coast and search for life on Mars with NASA's new rover. Your Videos on QUEST highlights an excerpt of Bay Area filmmaker Joshua Cassidy's short film, Life by the Tide. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1411] John Lewis Gaddis - "George F. Kennan: An American Life" John Lewis Gaddis is a noted historian of the Cold War and grand strategy, who has been hailed as the "Dean of Cold War Historians" by The New York Times. He is the Robert A. Lovett Professor of Military and Naval History at Yale University. He is also the official biographer of the seminal 20th century statesman George F. Kennan. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Making Waves This program explores Philadelphia's historic Boathouse Row, where great rowers and Olympic champions have trained for over 150 years. It looks at the elite world of rowing and how it perpetrates exclusion in subtle ways. The documentary focuses on several passionate rowers from diverse backgrounds. Recounting their own experiences in the sport, their stories also reveal how far the sport needs to change to truly reflect today's diverse society. duration 51:37   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Global Health Frontiers: Foul Water, Fiery Serpent This film, narrated by Academy Award-winner Sigourney Weaver, documents the efforts of American health workers and community partners over the course of 3 years as they track the last-known reports of guinea worm in Ghana and Sudan. Through a relentless cycle of success and failure, facing ignorance and tribal superstitions in a harsh, vast landscape ravaged by war, these dedicated young men and women struggle to drive an ancient enemy into extinction. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Truly CA: Our State, Our Stories [#801H] Beaverbrook The story of Camp Beaverbook, the much-loved summer camp that operated in Northern California from 1961-1985. This often humorous film offers a poignant reminder of a more innocent time. Archival footage and former campers' life-changing stories belie the camp's demise and the decline of the summer camp industry, in general. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3032] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5205H] * Mitt Romney returned to the campaign trail on Thursday following a week-long overseas trip that generated a lot of controversy. New polls show the presumptive Republican nominee has lost ground in Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida where President Obama leads. Amy Walter of ABC News will have a report on how President Obama and Mitt Romney are both working to energize their campaigns ahead of their party's political conventions and the concentrated efforts both candidates are making to win independent voters in battleground states.
    * Republicans are talking about the Tea Party's big victory in Texas Tuesday night when former state solicitor general Ted Cruz upset Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst in the Republican runoff for the US Senate. Cruz, who has never been elected to public office, heads into the November election as the favorite to replace retiring Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the influence the Tea Party and other grassroots conservative groups are having on establishment Republicans and the 2012 elections.
    * David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will have analysis of the July unemployment numbers due out Friday and the state of the economic recovery. Plus he'll explain why the budget process on Capitol Hill has grown wildly out of control as he reports in his new book, Red Ink: Inside the High-Stakes Politics of the Federal Budget.
    * This week Congress approved a stop-gap measure to avoid a government shutdown but left a number of bills unfinished ahead of its August recess. Susan Davis of USA Today will report on some of the pending legislation including an overhaul of the US Postal Service, an extension of agriculture subsidies, the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, and the administration backed Cybersecurity Act to protect the nation's electrical grid and water supply.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2339H] August 3, 2012 CPMC PLANS ON HOLD: Plans to build a new hospital in San Francisco at Cathedral Hill, currently home to several churches, and to rebuild St. Luke's in the Mission District, are on hold until November. The Board of Supervisors put the decision on the backburner while questions about an escape clause that would allow the hospital to be closed based on weak financial performance by the company raises a red flag.
    DROUGHT DRIVING UP FOOD PRICES: The drought gripping more than half the country is driving up food prices - including milk, beef, chicken and pork - due to the scorching heat and minimal rainfall. Drought is affecting over 80% of the county's corn crops. Consumers can expect to pay 3% to 4% more for groceries next year. < br />MARS ROVER LANDING: Excitement is more than sky high over a large rover that NASA is gearing up to land on Mars Sunday night. The 1-ton Curiosity will feed vivid images of the Red Planet back to Earth and work to find evidence of microbial life.
    Guests: Rachel Gordon, San Francisco Chronicle; Tom Vacar, KTVU; and Lisa Krieger, San Jose Mercury News.
    "JANE DOE" OF YOUR BLACK MUSLIM BAKERY: On the fifth year anniversary of the killing of Oakland journalist Chauncey Bailey by members of Your Black Muslim Bakery, the woman who exposed bakery owner Yusuf Bey Sr. for acts of sexual abuse, welfare fraud and violence has come forward. Previously identified as Jane Doe #1, Kowana Banks tells her personal story of abuse to Center for Investigative Reporting journalist Louise Rafkin. The story was reported in collaboration with the Chauncey Bailey Project. Belva Davis interviews Rafkin and Banks.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#501H] Track Elephant Seals/Life On Mars Meet scientists tracking elephant seals along San Mateo County's' coast and search for life on Mars with NASA's new rover. Your Videos on QUEST highlights an excerpt of Bay Area filmmaker Joshua Cassidy's short film, Life by the Tide. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1101] Mid-Atlantic States Brianna Barnes begins her travels in New Jersey with a visit to Atlantic City and Wildwoods on a 1950s themed weekend. Next it's on to Delaware, with stops in Lewes and Annapolis, followed by crabbing on the Chesapeake Bay. Brianna journeys through the Brandywine Valley, which stretches through Delaware and Pennsylvania, on her way to Philadelphia for a taste of the famous cheesesteaks and a look at the Art Museum. She continues west through Amish country, takes in the new Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville and checks out the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. Brianna makes her way to Virginia, where she encounters a replica of Stonehenge made entirely from Styrofoam and concludes her trip at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson. duration 55:01   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2406H] Supersize Crocs Tall tales of giant man-eating crocodiles inhabit a world between fact and fiction. The truth is that some crocodile species have been known to exceed 20 feet, such as Nile crocs, American crocs and the Asian-Pacific saltwater croc, which has been reported up to even 23 feet. Hosted by world-renowned herpetologist Romulus Whitaker, the program attempts to discover the last of these leviathans. duration 56:17   SRND51 TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#803H] Executed In Error The program profiles Hawley Crippen, who was convicted of poisoning and brutally dismembering his wife in 1910, and made even more infamous for being the first criminal to be caught with the help of the new wireless telegraph (soon to be called "radio"). However, analysis of the remains done this year proves that not only was the body not his wife, it wasn't even a woman and it may have been put there by the police. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    History Detectives [#1004H] What does the evocative symbol of a bird dropping a bomb mean? Did two patches with the symbol belong to a World War II unit? Then, Gwen Wright connects a tiny swatch of tattered red fabric to a pivotal moment in US Civil War history. Did a neckpiece and leggings once belong to Chief Black Kettle, known as a Cheyenne Peace Chief? Finally, did President Lincoln actually sign this note? duration 54:10   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1114] Globe Trekker Special: The Making of Globe Trekker Go behind the scenes of Globe Trekker to find out how the world's longest running and most popular travel series is made. Viewers will join a crew on the road to witness the logistical challenges of shooting this series, hearing the perspectives of hosts, producers, directors and crew. They'll also uncover never-before-seen moments from shoots over the years. duration 54:57   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, August 4, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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