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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, July 21, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, July 21, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31275Z] Concerns about Europe and Spain weigh on the markets. NBR's Susie Gharib speaks with Nicholas Colas, Chief Market Strategist at ConvergEx Kayak and Palo Alto Networks started trading today. New York Bureau Chief Suzanne Pratt takes a look at whether we might see more IPOs in the second half of 2012 In our weekly series on "Immigration & The Economy" we take a look at the impact immigration has on U.S. wages and jobs duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17202] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10415H] An Update On The Mass Shooting In Colorado * Refugees Flee Syria As Rebels Take Control Of Crossings * In California, Some Skepticism Over Smart Meters * Brooks And Dionne * A Preview Of The PBS Documentary 'Homeland' duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18150H] (original broadcast date: 07/20/12)
    Brain Series 2 Episode 10: Disorders of Motor Neurons - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Spinal Muscular Atrophy
    Eric Kandel of Columbia University, Dr. Richard Finkel of Nemours Children's Hospital, Dr. Neil Shneider of Columbia University; Peter Frates, Griffen Kingkiner, and Beth Kingkiner
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2650Z] Tavis concludes his two-part conversation with famed postmodern architect Frank Gehry about his imprint on skylines around the world. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31275Z] Concerns about Europe and Spain weigh on the markets. NBR's Susie Gharib speaks with Nicholas Colas, Chief Market Strategist at ConvergEx Kayak and Palo Alto Networks started trading today. New York Bureau Chief Suzanne Pratt takes a look at whether we might see more IPOs in the second half of 2012 In our weekly series on "Immigration & The Economy" we take a look at the impact immigration has on U.S. wages and jobs duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10415H] An Update On The Mass Shooting In Colorado * Refugees Flee Syria As Rebels Take Control Of Crossings * In California, Some Skepticism Over Smart Meters * Brooks And Dionne * A Preview Of The PBS Documentary 'Homeland' duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#1255] duration 59:00   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#428] Supporting Emerging Entrepreneurs In Zimbabwe CAMBODIAN RAIL EXPANSION - From Turkey to Singapore, the Trans-Asian Railway is a massive undertaking. Planned in 1960s, it was to connect Europe with Asia. More than 17,000 kilometers of track across the continents, the Trans-Siberian line is only one part of the project. Now, in Cambodia, tracks first laid in the colonial era are to be rebuilt. The UN hopes this will give local trade a boost and encourage tourism, helping a nation still reeling from the aftermath of war to get back on its feet.
    CLIMATE: CAMEL MILK FROM KENYA - Camels instead of cows. Lots of Europeans think that's a standard drink in Africa but it couldn't be further from the truth. Camels are used for transportation through the desert, while cows are raised for milk production. But climate change is forcing a rethink. Droughts are becoming more frequent, making it difficult to maintain grazing land for cows. NGOs are now encouraging people to try camels as an alternative. They can be milked all year round, the milk itself is healthier and it fetches a higher price at the market.
    A CHANCE FOR THE FUTURE - Berlinda Mkangawi was born in Zimbabwe and has founded a company with a friend in Harare. She offers consultations on how to start a business and market it. Now, the Kofi-Annan Foundation has sent the 35 year old to the European School of Management and Technology in Berlin. She is learning how to better support young entrepreneurs and emerging professionals in her country. We joined her during her time in Berlin.
    duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3028] The Return of Spain's Vultures (And We're Not Talking About Banks) BELGIUM: CONTROVERSIAL ORGAN DONATION - Last year, doctors in Belgium fulfilled a patient's request to die and have her organs donated. In Germany, breaking such a taboo could send the attending doctor to prison. After suffering a stroke, 43-year-old Diane gave up hope of getting better. Besides just wanting to die, she expressly stated a wish to donate her organs - a wish that can be fulfilled in Belgium. Germany, meanwhile, has a relatively low donation rate, despite there being some 12,000 patients on organ waiting lists. With the EU now also having applied pressure, the German parliament has introduced legislation that it hopes will prompt more people to consent to donation.
    MONTENEGRO: YACHT PARKING FOR MILLIONAIRES - On the Mediterranean coast of Montenegro, a marina for luxury yachts has been developing in recent years. The project shows how some have sailed through the economic crisis unscathed. A group led by Canadian billionaire Peter Munk has invested around 100 million euros in the Porto Montenegro marina and waterside development in the Bay of Kotor. In addition to berths for yachts up to 100 meters long, the development caters for the wealthy with vacation apartments, luxury brand boutiques and upscale restaurants. The complex's capacity is currently being doubled.
    TURKEY: CIRCUMCISION - The vast majority of boys in Turkey are circumcised. A court in Germany recently ruled that circumcisions performed for religious reasons should now be considered assault. The ruling has caused uproar in both the Muslim and Jewish communities in Germany - and further afield. In Turkey the news also hit the headlines. "Sunnet", as the procedure is known there, is completely normal practice in the country. It is considered an important element of Muslim identity, and is later linked to the transition from boy to man. A 9-year-old who is not circumcised will be treated like an outcast. For poorer families in Istanbul, the authorities cover the costs involved.
    SPAIN: VULTURES SOARING - Cinereous vultures, also known as black vultures, are among the biggest birds in Europe. They have a wing span of up to 2.90 meters. They've long been in danger of extinction, but now there's a growing population of black vultures on the island of Mallorca. Mallorca is today home to perhaps 200 of the impressive birds. The island now has a team who take care of any vultures that get injured. As recently as the early 1980s they were at acute risk of extinction in the area. The government even issued a bounty on the birds, because they were accused of snatching sheep. But in fact, cinereous vultures feed on cadavers - essentially helping out the local hygiene police.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1547Z] MINDFULNESS GOES MAINSTREAM - "I find that starting the day with a little bit of quiet time changes the whole complexion of the rest of the day. It's almost like warming up before you go into an athletic event. But the key is that you can do it anywhere," says Congressman Tim Ryan, author of A Mindful Nation.
    SYRIA MONASTERY - "We are together in front of God and recognize each other as believers - these Muslim, Christian and Jewish, they worship God in a kind of choir," Father Paolo Dall'Oglio told correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro in describing the work of his monastery before violence erupted in Syria.
    RAMADAN QURAN RECITATION - "When you are reciting the Quran you feel like you are talking to Allah," says Quran reciter Sheikh Mohammad Alraee. During Ramadan last year in 2011, he chanted the Quran from memory at the Islamic Center of Northern Virginia.
    MUSLIM OLYMPIC ATHLETES AND RAMADAN - "We asked religious scholars and they said that if we're out on a mission like this, there is no problem with not fasting on the condition that when you return, you fast the days you lost, because fasting like prayer is obligatory," says Abu Rmeileh, the first Palestinian to qualify for the Olympics.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#128H] America's "Sacrifice Zones" * There are forgotten corners of this country where Americans are trapped in endless cycles of poverty, powerlessness, and despair as a direct result of capitalistic greed. Journalist Chris Hedges calls these places "sacrifice zones," and joins Bill this week to explore how areas like Camden, New Jersey; Immokalee, Florida; and parts of West Virginia suffer while the corporations that plundered them thrive. "These are areas that have been destroyed for quarterly profit. We're talking about environmentally destroyed, communities destroyed, human beings destroyed, families destroyed," Hedges tells Bill. "It's the willingness on the part of people who seek personal enrichment to destroy other human beings. And because the mechanisms of governance can no longer control them, there is nothing now within the formal mechanisms of power to stop them from creating essentially a corporate oligarchic state." Hedges also makes the case that journalists "take sides," describing the difference between truth and news. "The really great reporters - and I've seen them in all sorts of news organizations - are management headaches because they care about truth at the expense of their own career," he says.
    * Also in the broadcast, a Bill Moyers Essay on how the failure of The DISCLOSE Act should bring anything BUT closure to the fight for government transparency.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2414] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5203H] * President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney spent the week on the campaign trail trying to define the presidential election and stakes and distinguish their individual strengths from their opponent's weaknesses. The Obama campaign and even some Republicans continue to put pressure on the former Massachusetts governor to release more income tax returns and be more transparent about his wealth and tax history. Meanwhile the Romney campaign ramped up its criticism of President Obama's economic policies and has begun using the president's own words on entrepreneurship against him. Polls show the campaign is in large part a battle for the middle-class, but are the attack ads and sharp campaign rhetoric winning supporters or turning off voters? We'll get answers and analysis from Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post and Jeff Zeleny of The New York Times. Plus Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News will report on just how much money both presidential campaigns and outside groups are spending in what will likely be the most expensive presidential election in history.
    * Overseas the 16-month old uprising in Syria between government troops and rebel forces continued. In the capital Damascus four major government officials were killed in a deadly bombing attack. On Thursday the UN Security Council tried to pass a resolution to impose further sanctions on President Basha al-Assad's regime but it was vetoed by Russia and China. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will have the latest on growing concerns about the Syrian government's next move amidst reports that chemical weapons have been moved within the country.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2337H] July 20, 2012 TRUVADA HIV DRUG - Just a week before the International AIDS Conference takes place in Washington, DC - the first time in 22 year that it will be held in the US - the drug Truvada has been approved for HIV prevention by the Food and Drug Administration. The news brings hope to those in high risk categories, but there are also concerns that it could lead to a return of risky behaviors.
    CEO MARISSA MAYER - Can Yahoo's new CEO Marissa Mayer balance running the high-profile tech company with being a new mother? Mayer has proven to be innovative as a former lead engineer and vice president at Google, but there's speculation over whether the 37-year-old Silicon Valley star can save the faltering Internet giant.
    CHALLENGES FOR MAYOR ED LEE - As embattled San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi's misconduct trial continues this week with testimony from his wife, Eliana Lopez, Mayor Ed Lee himself is the subject of an investigation for possible perjury by the Ethics Commission. This comes as a vote on Lee's major development deal with the California Pacific Medical Center is put on hold for two weeks and he encounters a backlash by the Board of Supervisors and the public to his push for a stop-and-frisk policy.
    Guests: Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health Blog; Jolie O'Dell, VentureBeat; and Rachel Gordon, San Francisco Chronicle.
    CAROLYN HOUSE STEWART, INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT, ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY, INC. - Attorney Carolyn House Stewart is the leader of the world's oldest and largest sorority for college educated African American women. The group holds their conference in San Francisco next week for the first time since the 1950s.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17202] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2119H] PREGNANT CEO: Yahoo's new CEO Marissa Mayer is not only one of only 20 Fortune 500 female CEO's, but also six months pregnant. Panelists debate whether working mothers really can have it all, or if 'having it all' is an outmoded concept.
    GLOBAL EQUALITY: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says data doesn't only measure progress, it inspires progress. She calls for closing the gap in the collection and use of gender-sensitive data. Panelists explore how this will help not only women but communities and societies.
    MEGHAN MCCAIN: We speak with the darling of moderate Republicans about whether she wants to go into politics.
    Panelists: Women's Campaign Fund President Siobhan "Sam" Bennett; National Council of Negro Women Executive Director Avis Jones-DeWeever; Republican Commentator Mercy Viana Schlapp and Conservative Blogger Crystal Wright.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3030] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#245H] CROSSING THE LINE, PART 2 - This groundbreaking report has been produced with assistance from the Nation Institute and the Investigative News Network. NTK airs its second investigation into alleged abuses by US Border Patrol agents. In the rush to stem the tide of undocumented immigrants, has Border Patrol committed widespread abuse on American soil? A former Border Patrol agent blows the whistle on unacceptable conditions in detention centers, including massive over-crowding and detainees who claim they were deprived of food and water. Correspondent John Larson investigates stories of physical abuse, sexual assault and even torture. Jeff Greenfield anchors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#128H] America's "Sacrifice Zones" * There are forgotten corners of this country where Americans are trapped in endless cycles of poverty, powerlessness, and despair as a direct result of capitalistic greed. Journalist Chris Hedges calls these places "sacrifice zones," and joins Bill this week to explore how areas like Camden, New Jersey; Immokalee, Florida; and parts of West Virginia suffer while the corporations that plundered them thrive. "These are areas that have been destroyed for quarterly profit. We're talking about environmentally destroyed, communities destroyed, human beings destroyed, families destroyed," Hedges tells Bill. "It's the willingness on the part of people who seek personal enrichment to destroy other human beings. And because the mechanisms of governance can no longer control them, there is nothing now within the formal mechanisms of power to stop them from creating essentially a corporate oligarchic state." Hedges also makes the case that journalists "take sides," describing the difference between truth and news. "The really great reporters - and I've seen them in all sorts of news organizations - are management headaches because they care about truth at the expense of their own career," he says.
    * Also in the broadcast, a Bill Moyers Essay on how the failure of The DISCLOSE Act should bring anything BUT closure to the fight for government transparency.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Natural Heroes [#407] Sea Animal Rescuers Papa Tortuga - Fernando Manzano was just 16 years old when he found his calling. For the last 31 years, he has dedicated himself to bringing the Lora turtle back from the edge of extinction. In the small town of Tecolutla, Mexico, he has battled mother nature, natural predators and poachers. All without any outside financial support. Salton Sea Rescue Rangers - The mysterious Salton Sea is a critical stopover for the survival of millions of migrating birds. A devastating outbreak of avian botulism killed thousands of birds, including the endangered California brown pelican. The US Fish & Wildlife rangers of the Sonny Bono National Refuge now run daily airboat patrols around the Sea looking for sick birds, as early detection is essential for survival. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:30 pm
    QUEST [#316] Algae Power/Condors Vs. Lead Bullets Could algae become tomorrow's fuel? QUEST investigates and California condors are making a steady recovery. But a new threat - lead poisoning from old bullets - is slowing progress. duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1409] Frank Costigliola - "Roosevelt's Lost Alliances: How Personal Politics Helped Start the Cold War" Frank Costigliola is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Connecticut. He is a recipient of fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Norwegian Nobel Institute. In 2002 he received the Chancellor's award for excellence in research and the Alumni Association's award for excellence in research. In 2009, he served as president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR). This is the Gordon and Mary Beth Smyth History Forum. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Queen & Country [#103H] The Queen's Possessions The Queen has some surprising possessions. Among them are Westminster Abbey and the Chapels Royal. These are "peculiars of the crown" -- as are the Channel Islands, where they still call Her Majesty the Duke of Normandy to remind outsiders that they were with William the Conqueror on the winning side at the Battle of Hastings. The queen also owns the Tower of London -- part of a collection of Historic Royal Palaces. Not forgetting the Royal Collection -- to which she has added nearly 150 portraits over the past six decades. duration 56:16   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Small Farm Rising Right now, in our back yards, a new generation of farmers is redefining agriculture in America. Small, modern, sustainable and rooted in the community, these local farms are in the forefront of a movement growing across the nation. A family owned and operated farm produces award-winning goat milk cheeses; a farm powered solely by horses provides members with a full diet year-round; and two youthful entrepreneurs run an organic vegetable farm. This documentary invites you to explore the sustainable practices, creative business models and deep connections to the communities of these three small farms in the shadow of the Adirondack Mountains. Experience one full growing season through the eyes of first-generation farmers as they enrich and enliven their rural environments. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Home Fields: Digging Into Local Food Reporter/producer Clay Masters looks through the lens of Midwest producers, consumers, grocery store owners, restaurateurs and researchers to understand how local food networks operate. Supporters of the "local food movement" reason that the industry is growing because local food is fresher, tastier and more nutritious. They say it means fewer miles traveled to deliver food to the seller, which results in a smaller carbon footprint. Because smaller local farms don't limit the type of crops produced for economic efficiency, followers say they can offer more variety. Plus, supporters cite the fact that the system benefits local farmers.
    Masters reports there are disadvantages, too. Local food is often limited by seasonal availability, and the true size of the carbon footprint for local food is being debated as well. This program looks at questions such as what "local" means to people; how local food systems are developing; what barriers are there to making them work; and how consumers can be convinced to pay more for local food, as well as afford it.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    Food Forward [#101H] Urban Agriculture Across America From the rooftop farms of New York City to the food deserts of Detroit, join us as Food Forward explores the explosion of urban agriculture across America. Meet food rebel John Mooney, whose space-age hydroponic farm on top of a historic building in the West Village of Manhattan is a window into the future of rooftop farming. In Milwaukee, meet the biggest name in urban agriculture, Will Allen, who inspires a new generation of aquaponic innovators. We then learn of one woman's transition from hanging out to harvesting food on the streets of West Oakland.
    Finally, we finish in Detroit with Travis Roberts, an eighteen-year-old who grew up watching the city struggle with increasing urban blight. In trouble and more than 100 pounds overweight, he discovered the city's urban agriculture movement and found a new purpose in life through urban chicken farming. Travis is joined by a cast of powerful characters in Detroit that are rebuilding their city, block by block. Food Forward opens the door into a new world of possibility, where pioneers and visionaries are creating viable alternatives to food systems.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3030] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5203H] * President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney spent the week on the campaign trail trying to define the presidential election and stakes and distinguish their individual strengths from their opponent's weaknesses. The Obama campaign and even some Republicans continue to put pressure on the former Massachusetts governor to release more income tax returns and be more transparent about his wealth and tax history. Meanwhile the Romney campaign ramped up its criticism of President Obama's economic policies and has begun using the president's own words on entrepreneurship against him. Polls show the campaign is in large part a battle for the middle-class, but are the attack ads and sharp campaign rhetoric winning supporters or turning off voters? We'll get answers and analysis from Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post and Jeff Zeleny of The New York Times. Plus Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News will report on just how much money both presidential campaigns and outside groups are spending in what will likely be the most expensive presidential election in history.
    * Overseas the 16-month old uprising in Syria between government troops and rebel forces continued. In the capital Damascus four major government officials were killed in a deadly bombing attack. On Thursday the UN Security Council tried to pass a resolution to impose further sanctions on President Basha al-Assad's regime but it was vetoed by Russia and China. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will have the latest on growing concerns about the Syrian government's next move amidst reports that chemical weapons have been moved within the country.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2337H] July 20, 2012 TRUVADA HIV DRUG - Just a week before the International AIDS Conference takes place in Washington, DC - the first time in 22 year that it will be held in the US - the drug Truvada has been approved for HIV prevention by the Food and Drug Administration. The news brings hope to those in high risk categories, but there are also concerns that it could lead to a return of risky behaviors.
    CEO MARISSA MAYER - Can Yahoo's new CEO Marissa Mayer balance running the high-profile tech company with being a new mother? Mayer has proven to be innovative as a former lead engineer and vice president at Google, but there's speculation over whether the 37-year-old Silicon Valley star can save the faltering Internet giant.
    CHALLENGES FOR MAYOR ED LEE - As embattled San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi's misconduct trial continues this week with testimony from his wife, Eliana Lopez, Mayor Ed Lee himself is the subject of an investigation for possible perjury by the Ethics Commission. This comes as a vote on Lee's major development deal with the California Pacific Medical Center is put on hold for two weeks and he encounters a backlash by the Board of Supervisors and the public to his push for a stop-and-frisk policy.
    Guests: Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health Blog; Jolie O'Dell, VentureBeat; and Rachel Gordon, San Francisco Chronicle.
    CAROLYN HOUSE STEWART, INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT, ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY, INC. - Attorney Carolyn House Stewart is the leader of the world's oldest and largest sorority for college educated African American women. The group holds their conference in San Francisco next week for the first time since the 1950s.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#316] Algae Power/Condors Vs. Lead Bullets Could algae become tomorrow's fuel? QUEST investigates and California condors are making a steady recovery. But a new threat - lead poisoning from old bullets - is slowing progress. duration 26:19   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1116] Globe Trekker Special: World History-England Justine Shapiro starts her historical journey dodging swords in a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings, then travels up the coast to visit the Royal Pavilion in Brighton. Passing through London, she takes a canal ride up to the Yorkshire Moors where she boards a double-decker bus/hotel. The next stop is Whitby, the eerie coastal town that inspired Bram Stoker to write "Dracula." Justine strolls along Hadrian's Wall, has a chance meeting with a centurion and rides a steam train before visiting Liverpool, home of The Beatles. Venturing south into England's West Country, Justine meets the very eccentric Marquess of Bath and joins a pagan celebration in Glastonbury before ending her journey in Ottery St. Mary, where the locals run through the narrow streets with huge, flaming tar barrels to celebrate Guy Fawkes Night. duration 57:43   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2814] Bears of the Last Frontier: The Road North Part 2 of 3: The Road North - This hour explores the world of black bears caught in the crossroads of urban development in Anchorage and the wilderness. This is a new normal for bears and for their human neighbors. Some bears are so comfortable living in urban surroundings that their primary habitat is a golf course. In residential areas, bears frequently raid garbage bins and birdfeeders for easy snacks. But these behaviors are less than ideal for bears and residents alike. Morgan heads north out of Anchorage to Denali National Park, where the mountains loom over treeless plains and bears get by on a diet of thousands of berries a day. The grizzlies share the enormous park with foxes, wolves, and moose - and with one intrepid bear biologist and his team. Morgan continues his journey north on a bone-shaking 610-mile motorcycle journey from Denali to Prudhoe Bay along the only Alaskan Highway to reach the Arctic. Prudhoe Bay, a once-pristine area at the edge of the Arctic Ocean, has been changed forever by the oil industry. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3013Z] The Elegant Universe: The String's The Thing Part 2 of 3: The second hour opens with a whimsical movie scene in which the history of the universe runs backwards to the Big Bang, the moment at which general relativity and quantum mechanics both come into play - therefore the point at which the conventional model of reality breaks down. Then it's string theory to the rescue as Greene describes the serendipitous steps that led from a forgotten 200-year-old mathematical formula to the first glimmerings of strings - quivering strands of energy whose different vibrations give rise to quarks, electrons, photons and all other elementary particles. Strings are truly tiny - smaller than an atomby the same factor that a tree is smaller than the entire universe. But, as Greene explains, it is possible - for the first time ever - to combine the laws of the large and the laws of the small into a proposal for a single, harmonious Theory of Everything. duration 54:34   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Leonardo's Dream Machines [#101] This two-part program follows the world's leading experts as they attempt for the first time to build some of Leonardo da Vinci's dream machines - to his exact specification and scale - 500 years after he first committed his ideas to paper. Were Leonardo's ideas the flights of fancy of a gifted artist or revolutionary designs hundreds of years ahead of their time? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1112] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Scandinavia Merrilees Parker takes a culinary tour around Scandinavia, a region infused with Viking history and heritage. She begins her travels at a Viking festival, learns how to smoke herring in a Swedish village, assists with the smorgasbord at the Midsummer Festival, prepares moose with Lars Backman - the inspiration for the Swedish Chef on "The Muppet Show" - and cooks with the Sami people at the Arctic Circle. duration 57:32   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, July 21, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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