Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Monday, April 9, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, April 9, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1026] Egypt Megan McCormick starts her journey in the sprawling city of Cairo at the bazaar of Khan al-Khalili, open for business since the Middle Ages. From here she visits the mosque at Ibn Tulun, the legendary spot where Noah's Ark came to rest. Megan's next stop is Giza and the Great Pyramids, built as tombs for three Pharaohs. She arrives in the oasis town of Siwa, famous for its dates and olives, stops off in Bahariyya, where she is personally greeted by the mayor, and treks to Luxor for a hot-air balloon ride over the Valley of the Kings. Her final destination is Abu Simbel, the gateway to southern Egypt and home to the massive Sun Temple of Ramses. duration 56:08   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 am
    Revolutionaries [#108H] The Man Who Invented The Computer Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jane Smiley discusses The Man Who Invented the Computer, John Vincent Atanasoff, with John Hollar, ceo of the Computer History Museum. duration 53:06   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#113H] Gambling with Your Money You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of mercenary lobbyists, are working hard to diminish or destroy these protections. One of the biggest bull's-eyes is on the Volcker Rule, a section of the Dodd-Frank Law that aims to keep the banks in which you deposit your money from gambling it on their own - sometimes risky-- investments.
    This week, Bill talks with the namesake of the Volcker Rule - Paul Volcker, who served two terms as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1979-1987 and currently heads President Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Volcker contends the rule aims to end conflicts of interest between bankers and their customers. He suggests that former investment companies like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, which sought banking licenses during the economic crisis in order to access federal protection against failing, should now turn in those licenses if they want to do speculative trading. "You shouldn't run a financial system on the expectation of government support. We're supposed to be a free enterprise system," Volcker tells Moyers. "The problem of course is once they get rescued, does that lead to the conclusion they'll get rescued in the future?"
    If all that disillusions you about government, know you aren't entirely powerless to create change. So says Bill's second guest, Carne Ross. Once the rising star of British diplomacy and now a global activist, Ross' book "The Leaderless Revolution" outlines ways to create alternative systems of governance and commerce. "We have to accept that government is no longer fixing things for us. Whoever's in charge, whichever bunch of politicians has taken over government, they will not provide the answer," Ross tells Moyers. "We have to instead take on the burden ourselves. That is a fundamental cultural change, and I think it requires a real examination of our role in political circumstances." Ross, who resigned his British diplomatic role in objection to his government's positions during the Iraq War, shares nine crucial principles for effective citizen action. He also describes his work with the Occupy movement to devise an alternative banking system - an "Occupy Bank" - more aligned with the public interest.
    Moyers concludes the broadcast with an essay on what several American cities are doing to restructure Wall Street from the bottom up.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Panama Canal: American Experience [#2304] On August 15th, 1914, the Panama Canal opened connecting the world's two largest oceans and signaling America's emergence as a global superpower. American ingenuity and innovation had succeeded where, just a few years earlier, the French had failed disastrously. But the U.S. paid a price for victory: more than a decade of ceaseless, grinding toil, an outlay of more than 350 million dollars -- the largest single federal expenditure in history to that time -- and the loss of more than 5,000 lives. Along the way, Central America witnessed the brazen overthrow of a sovereign government, a revolutionary public health campaign, the backbreaking removal of hundreds of millions of tons of earth and construction on an unprecedented scale. The story of the canal features a cast of colorful characters ranging from an indomitable President to visionary engineers to tens of thousands of workers from around the world, rigidly segregated by race. Using an extraordinary archive of photographs and footage, Interviews with canal workers and first-hand accounts of life in the Canal zone, director Stephen Ives and producer Amanda Pollak (New Orleans, Roads to Memphis) unravel the story of one of the world's most significant technological achievements. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:30 am
    Grand Coulee Dam: American Experience Grand Coulee was more than a dam; it was a proclamation. In the wake of the Great Depression, America turned from private enterprise to public works - not simply to provide jobs, but to restore faith. The ultimate expression of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, Grand Coulee played a central role in transforming the Northwest; it was the largest hydroelectric power producing facility in the world when it was completed in March 1941. After WWII, a vast irrigation project made possible by the dam helped turn the barren deserts of central Washington into rich farmland. But the dam prevented access to one of the greatest salmon rivers in the world. Deprived of the salmon - their most important resource - the native people who lived along the Columbia witnessed a profound cultural decline. Featuring the men and women who lived and worked at Grand Coulee and the native people whose lives were changed, as well as historians and engineers, this film explores how the tension between technological achievement and environmental impact hangs over the project's legacy. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1532Z] BOSTON BOY CHOIR - On this Easter weekend of great religious music, we visit the Boston Archdiocesan Choir School. It is the only Catholic all-boy choir school in the country and has been described not as a school with a choir, but as a choir with a school.
    PARISH NURSES - "As a parish nurse one of the greatest things we do is be present and just listen," says Diane Tieman of Queen of the Rosary Roman Catholic Church in suburban Chicago. There is a growing number of registered nurses on the staffs of churches of many denominations, helping people with both physical and spiritual care.
    NEW PASSOVER SEDER HAGGADAH - "This haggadah is trying to draw in as many people as possible to participate in the service," says artist Mark Podwal, who describes his illustrations for the text of Sharing the Journey. "For me," says Podwal, "my art is prayer."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 am
    Closer to Truth [#1001] Is The Universe Religiously Ambiguous? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#113H] Gambling with Your Money You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of mercenary lobbyists, are working hard to diminish or destroy these protections. One of the biggest bull's-eyes is on the Volcker Rule, a section of the Dodd-Frank Law that aims to keep the banks in which you deposit your money from gambling it on their own - sometimes risky-- investments.
    This week, Bill talks with the namesake of the Volcker Rule - Paul Volcker, who served two terms as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1979-1987 and currently heads President Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Volcker contends the rule aims to end conflicts of interest between bankers and their customers. He suggests that former investment companies like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, which sought banking licenses during the economic crisis in order to access federal protection against failing, should now turn in those licenses if they want to do speculative trading. "You shouldn't run a financial system on the expectation of government support. We're supposed to be a free enterprise system," Volcker tells Moyers. "The problem of course is once they get rescued, does that lead to the conclusion they'll get rescued in the future?"
    If all that disillusions you about government, know you aren't entirely powerless to create change. So says Bill's second guest, Carne Ross. Once the rising star of British diplomacy and now a global activist, Ross' book "The Leaderless Revolution" outlines ways to create alternative systems of governance and commerce. "We have to accept that government is no longer fixing things for us. Whoever's in charge, whichever bunch of politicians has taken over government, they will not provide the answer," Ross tells Moyers. "We have to instead take on the burden ourselves. That is a fundamental cultural change, and I think it requires a real examination of our role in political circumstances." Ross, who resigned his British diplomatic role in objection to his government's positions during the Iraq War, shares nine crucial principles for effective citizen action. He also describes his work with the Occupy movement to devise an alternative banking system - an "Occupy Bank" - more aligned with the public interest.
    Moyers concludes the broadcast with an essay on what several American cities are doing to restructure Wall Street from the bottom up.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Revolutionaries [#108H] The Man Who Invented The Computer Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jane Smiley discusses The Man Who Invented the Computer, John Vincent Atanasoff, with John Hollar, ceo of the Computer History Museum. duration 53:06   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1532Z] BOSTON BOY CHOIR - On this Easter weekend of great religious music, we visit the Boston Archdiocesan Choir School. It is the only Catholic all-boy choir school in the country and has been described not as a school with a choir, but as a choir with a school.
    PARISH NURSES - "As a parish nurse one of the greatest things we do is be present and just listen," says Diane Tieman of Queen of the Rosary Roman Catholic Church in suburban Chicago. There is a growing number of registered nurses on the staffs of churches of many denominations, helping people with both physical and spiritual care.
    NEW PASSOVER SEDER HAGGADAH - "This haggadah is trying to draw in as many people as possible to participate in the service," says artist Mark Podwal, who describes his illustrations for the text of Sharing the Journey. "For me," says Podwal, "my art is prayer."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Closer to Truth [#1001] Is The Universe Religiously Ambiguous? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#113H] Gambling with Your Money You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of mercenary lobbyists, are working hard to diminish or destroy these protections. One of the biggest bull's-eyes is on the Volcker Rule, a section of the Dodd-Frank Law that aims to keep the banks in which you deposit your money from gambling it on their own - sometimes risky-- investments.
    This week, Bill talks with the namesake of the Volcker Rule - Paul Volcker, who served two terms as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1979-1987 and currently heads President Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Volcker contends the rule aims to end conflicts of interest between bankers and their customers. He suggests that former investment companies like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, which sought banking licenses during the economic crisis in order to access federal protection against failing, should now turn in those licenses if they want to do speculative trading. "You shouldn't run a financial system on the expectation of government support. We're supposed to be a free enterprise system," Volcker tells Moyers. "The problem of course is once they get rescued, does that lead to the conclusion they'll get rescued in the future?"
    If all that disillusions you about government, know you aren't entirely powerless to create change. So says Bill's second guest, Carne Ross. Once the rising star of British diplomacy and now a global activist, Ross' book "The Leaderless Revolution" outlines ways to create alternative systems of governance and commerce. "We have to accept that government is no longer fixing things for us. Whoever's in charge, whichever bunch of politicians has taken over government, they will not provide the answer," Ross tells Moyers. "We have to instead take on the burden ourselves. That is a fundamental cultural change, and I think it requires a real examination of our role in political circumstances." Ross, who resigned his British diplomatic role in objection to his government's positions during the Iraq War, shares nine crucial principles for effective citizen action. He also describes his work with the Occupy movement to devise an alternative banking system - an "Occupy Bank" - more aligned with the public interest.
    Moyers concludes the broadcast with an essay on what several American cities are doing to restructure Wall Street from the bottom up.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    Revolutionaries [#108H] The Man Who Invented The Computer Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jane Smiley discusses The Man Who Invented the Computer, John Vincent Atanasoff, with John Hollar, ceo of the Computer History Museum. duration 53:06   STEREO TVG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#1181] duration 59:00   TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    BBC World News America [#16100] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2575Z] Tavis talks with four-time Oscar-nominated filmmaker Lawrence Kasdan about his most recent projects, as well as the 20th anniversary of his film The Bodyguard. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#3008] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#8071] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    BBC World News America [#18100] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#31201Z] Wall Street got a chance to react to Friday's employment reports and it's not good. New York Correspondent Erika Miller explains why the economic outlook isn't the only worry in investors' minds. Economist Simon Johnson says Europe's troubles are not over. NBR Co-Anchor Susie Gharib talks to him about why he more taxes are the answer to the U.S. deficit. AOL gets cash, but why is Microsoft paying up for their patents? Washington Correspondent Darren Gersh reports. Today President Obama and Brazil's leader announced that they would scale up economic cooperation. A JP Morgan strategist talks to NBR Co-Anchor Susie Gharib about the deal. Coffee stocks-- mild, medium, or dark roast? TheStreet.com's Debra Borchardt talks to NBR Co-Anchor Tom Hudson about java. What's in store for the economy at the end of the year. The Parthenon Group's Richard DeKaser shares his prediction. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10302H] Violence In Syria Spreads * "Stand Your Ground" Laws * Ms. Rousseff Goes To Washington * Remembering A Television News Icon * Japanese Scrolls In Washington duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    BBC World News America [#18100] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3051] duration 1:00  
  • 5:30 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10302H] Violence In Syria Spreads * "Stand Your Ground" Laws * Ms. Rousseff Goes To Washington * Remembering A Television News Icon * Japanese Scrolls In Washington duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:27 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3051] duration 1:00  
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#3008] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Panetta Institute Lectures [#702] The Economy Discussing the economy will be Robert Reich, professor, author, advisor to presidents and former Secretary of Labor; and Alan Simpson, co-chair of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, and former US Senator. Ron Insana, CNBC senior analyst and financial industry expert will moderate. duration 1:29:30   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 pm
    Charlie Rose [#18076] (original broadcast date: 04/09/12)
    * Mike Allen, Jon Meacham and Evan Thomas on their e-book about the Republican Primaries called 'Inside the Circus'
    * James Gorman, Chief Executive Officer of Morgan Stanley
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3051] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2576Z] Tavis talks with Olympic swimming champion Janet Evans. The four-time Olympic gold medalist and mother of two discusses her renewed love for swimming, balancing training with motherhood and how her return to the Olympics impacts her legacy. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3051] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10302H] Violence In Syria Spreads * "Stand Your Ground" Laws * Ms. Rousseff Goes To Washington * Remembering A Television News Icon * Japanese Scrolls In Washington duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3051] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#1181] duration 59:00   TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31201Z] Wall Street got a chance to react to Friday's employment reports and it's not good. New York Correspondent Erika Miller explains why the economic outlook isn't the only worry in investors' minds. Economist Simon Johnson says Europe's troubles are not over. NBR Co-Anchor Susie Gharib talks to him about why he more taxes are the answer to the U.S. deficit. AOL gets cash, but why is Microsoft paying up for their patents? Washington Correspondent Darren Gersh reports. Today President Obama and Brazil's leader announced that they would scale up economic cooperation. A JP Morgan strategist talks to NBR Co-Anchor Susie Gharib about the deal. Coffee stocks-- mild, medium, or dark roast? TheStreet.com's Debra Borchardt talks to NBR Co-Anchor Tom Hudson about java. What's in store for the economy at the end of the year. The Parthenon Group's Richard DeKaser shares his prediction. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    Newsline [#3008] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
Monday, April 9, 2012

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too