Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, April 8, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, April 8, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1010] Globe Trekker Special: Best American Hikes Go climb a mountain with the Globe Trekkers! Among the challenges awaiting them include the Grand Tetons in Wyoming, Mount Rainier in Washington and the Sangre de Cristo mountains in Colorado. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2325H] April 6, 2012 * In the wake of the devastating shooting at Oikos University in Oakland, hundreds of community members attend an international prayer vigil. Meanwhile, Mayor Jean Quan calls for a renewed effort to curb gun violence and improve access to mental health services.
    * Yahoo hands out pink slips to 2000 employees, implementing the most significant layoff in the company's history. New CEO Scott Thompson is expected to make further cuts this year as part of a monumental corporate restructuring.
    * Oil giant Chevron is dealt an unexpected blow as the Contra Costa County Assessment Appeals Board slaps an additional estimated $26.7 million in taxes on its Richmond refinery, claiming the property was previously undervalued by the county.
    * As baseball season kicks off, the San Francisco Giants sign a record $127.5 million deal with All-Star pitcher Matt Cain and unveil plans for "Mission Rock," a new waterfront development next to AT&T Park.
    Guests: Mina Kim, KQED News; Lisa Vorderbrueggen, Contra Costa Times; Kara Swisher, All Things D; and Rachel Gordon, San Francisco Chronicle.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    QUEST [#402] Catching Up on Sleep Science / Landslide Detectives QUEST investigates how sleep affects our minds and bodies, and meet the geologists studying the devastating potential for landslides in the Bay Area. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1101] Mid-Atlantic States Brianna Barnes begins her travels in New Jersey with a visit to Atlantic City and Wildwoods on a 1950s themed weekend. Next it's on to Delaware, with stops in Lewes and Annapolis, followed by crabbing on the Chesapeake Bay. Brianna journeys through the Brandywine Valley, which stretches through Delaware and Pennsylvania, on her way to Philadelphia for a taste of the famous cheesesteaks and a look at the Art Museum. She continues west through Amish country, takes in the new Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville and checks out the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. Brianna makes her way to Virginia, where she encounters a replica of Stonehenge made entirely from Styrofoam and concludes her trip at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson. duration 55:01   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Nature [#2411H] Dogs That Changed The World, Pt. 1 - The Rise of the Dog From the tiniest Chihuahua to the largest St. Bernard, all dogs claim the wolf as their ancestor. Using DNA analysis and other research, scientists have now pieced together the puzzle of canine evolution, creating a fascinating picture of some of the essential dogs vital to the canine population. Part one chronicles the evolution of dogs and how they infiltrated human society. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG
  • 4:00 am
    Nova [#3906H] Hunting The Elements What are things made of? It's a simple question with an astonishing answer. Fewer than 100 naturally occurring elements form the ingredients of everything in our world -- from solid rocks to ethereal gases, from scorching acids to the living cells in our body. David Pogue, lively host of Nova's popular "Making Stuff" series and personal technology correspondent for "The New York Times," spins viewers through the world of weird, extreme chemistry on a quest to unlock the secrets of the elements. Why are some elements, like platinum and gold, relatively inert while others, like phosphorus and potassium, are violently explosive? Why are some vital to every breath we take while others are potentially lethal? Punctuated by surprising and often alarming experiments, Pogue takes NOVA on a roller coaster ride through nature's hidden lab and the compelling stories of discovery that revealed its secrets. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Need To Know [#230H] Help Wanted In this month's "Help Wanted" edition, NTK travels to Philadelphia to examine the city's ambitious plan to reach out to and re-engage high school dropouts. The story is part of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's "American Graduate" initiative.
    * Princeton economics professor Cecilia Rouse explores how the nation's high dropout rate undermines the nation's competitive position in the world.
    * Jon Meacham contributes an essay on "American Voices."
    Maria Hinojosa anchors.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 am
    Natural Heroes [#505] The Edge of the Sea Since the late 1960's, Puerto Rico's small fishing villages have undergone expansive coastal development, driven by tourism and the growing demand for beachfront property. The Edge of the Sea follows a third generation fisherman in his battle against a developer planning to build a mega condo project on one of Rincon's most popular public beaches. This film explores both sides of the privatization of public areas, and the sensitive social and environmental consequences of excessive coastal development. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    QUEST [#402] Catching Up on Sleep Science / Landslide Detectives QUEST investigates how sleep affects our minds and bodies, and meet the geologists studying the devastating potential for landslides in the Bay Area. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#113H] Gambling with Your Money You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of mercenary lobbyists, are working hard to diminish or destroy these protections. One of the biggest bull's-eyes is on the Volcker Rule, a section of the Dodd-Frank Law that aims to keep the banks in which you deposit your money from gambling it on their own - sometimes risky-- investments.
    This week, Bill talks with the namesake of the Volcker Rule - Paul Volcker, who served two terms as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1979-1987 and currently heads President Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Volcker contends the rule aims to end conflicts of interest between bankers and their customers. He suggests that former investment companies like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, which sought banking licenses during the economic crisis in order to access federal protection against failing, should now turn in those licenses if they want to do speculative trading. "You shouldn't run a financial system on the expectation of government support. We're supposed to be a free enterprise system," Volcker tells Moyers. "The problem of course is once they get rescued, does that lead to the conclusion they'll get rescued in the future?"
    If all that disillusions you about government, know you aren't entirely powerless to create change. So says Bill's second guest, Carne Ross. Once the rising star of British diplomacy and now a global activist, Ross' book "The Leaderless Revolution" outlines ways to create alternative systems of governance and commerce. "We have to accept that government is no longer fixing things for us. Whoever's in charge, whichever bunch of politicians has taken over government, they will not provide the answer," Ross tells Moyers. "We have to instead take on the burden ourselves. That is a fundamental cultural change, and I think it requires a real examination of our role in political circumstances." Ross, who resigned his British diplomatic role in objection to his government's positions during the Iraq War, shares nine crucial principles for effective citizen action. He also describes his work with the Occupy movement to devise an alternative banking system - an "Occupy Bank" - more aligned with the public interest.
    Moyers concludes the broadcast with an essay on what several American cities are doing to restructure Wall Street from the bottom up.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#841] Great Investors Exclusive: Bill Miller & Paul McCulley, Part 1 This week: two "Great Investors" who are calling for new thinking and strategies by investors, economists and policy makers. Consuelo Mack interviews Legg Mason's legendary fund manager Bill Miller and bond guru Paul McCulley together from Paris, in part one of this WealthTrack television exclusive. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#110H] Host Ric Edelman sits down with Kim Clark, US News & World Report editor, to discuss ways to pay for college. He also explains common misconceptions about IRAs, how to ensure real satisfaction in retirement and the crucial importance of rebalancing a stock portfolio. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2351] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3015] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5141H] * Mitt Romney's victories in Wisconsin, Maryland and Washington, DC. this week pushed him past the halfway mark toward the 1144 delegates needed to clinch the GOP nomination. But the internal battle for the party's nomination continues with Rick Santorum vowing to stay in the race.
    * Meanwhile the real battleground shifted on the national stage this week when President Obama called out Mitt Romney by name and accused him of "thinly veiled social Darwinism" for supporting Republican budget proposals. Mitt Romney countered with sharp criticism of President Obama over his economic record and accused him of shifting his positions to win a second term. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News will explain how Mitt Romney is trying to unite his party as the general election campaign gets underway.
    * For women voters - and the candidates - social issues could be as much of a factor as the economy in the upcoming presidential race. A new USA TODAY/Gallup Poll found President Obama holding an overwhelming lead with women over Mitt Romney. Did the recent political battle over health care and government-sponsored contraception alienate women and widen the gender gap? Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post returns from the campaign trail with analysis.
    * Earlier in the week President Obama's controversial remarks about the Supreme Court's review of his signature healthcare reform law sparked outrage among conservatives who accused Mr. Obama of trying to "bully" the justices. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times will explain why the high court's final decision on the health care law could become a major issue for both parties in the presidential campaign and how the Justice Department is being forced to back up President Obama's comments.
    * First-time applications for unemployment benefits fell last week to the lowest numbers since April 2008 fueling optimism ahead of Friday's release of March's official unemployment numbers. Has the economy found solid footing on the road to recovery? We'll get answers and analysis from David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2325H] April 6, 2012 * In the wake of the devastating shooting at Oikos University in Oakland, hundreds of community members attend an international prayer vigil. Meanwhile, Mayor Jean Quan calls for a renewed effort to curb gun violence and improve access to mental health services.
    * Yahoo hands out pink slips to 2000 employees, implementing the most significant layoff in the company's history. New CEO Scott Thompson is expected to make further cuts this year as part of a monumental corporate restructuring.
    * Oil giant Chevron is dealt an unexpected blow as the Contra Costa County Assessment Appeals Board slaps an additional estimated $26.7 million in taxes on its Richmond refinery, claiming the property was previously undervalued by the county.
    * As baseball season kicks off, the San Francisco Giants sign a record $127.5 million deal with All-Star pitcher Matt Cain and unveil plans for "Mission Rock," a new waterfront development next to AT&T Park.
    Guests: Mina Kim, KQED News; Lisa Vorderbrueggen, Contra Costa Times; Kara Swisher, All Things D; and Rachel Gordon, San Francisco Chronicle.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#113H] Gambling with Your Money You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of mercenary lobbyists, are working hard to diminish or destroy these protections. One of the biggest bull's-eyes is on the Volcker Rule, a section of the Dodd-Frank Law that aims to keep the banks in which you deposit your money from gambling it on their own - sometimes risky-- investments.
    This week, Bill talks with the namesake of the Volcker Rule - Paul Volcker, who served two terms as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1979-1987 and currently heads President Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Volcker contends the rule aims to end conflicts of interest between bankers and their customers. He suggests that former investment companies like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, which sought banking licenses during the economic crisis in order to access federal protection against failing, should now turn in those licenses if they want to do speculative trading. "You shouldn't run a financial system on the expectation of government support. We're supposed to be a free enterprise system," Volcker tells Moyers. "The problem of course is once they get rescued, does that lead to the conclusion they'll get rescued in the future?"
    If all that disillusions you about government, know you aren't entirely powerless to create change. So says Bill's second guest, Carne Ross. Once the rising star of British diplomacy and now a global activist, Ross' book "The Leaderless Revolution" outlines ways to create alternative systems of governance and commerce. "We have to accept that government is no longer fixing things for us. Whoever's in charge, whichever bunch of politicians has taken over government, they will not provide the answer," Ross tells Moyers. "We have to instead take on the burden ourselves. That is a fundamental cultural change, and I think it requires a real examination of our role in political circumstances." Ross, who resigned his British diplomatic role in objection to his government's positions during the Iraq War, shares nine crucial principles for effective citizen action. He also describes his work with the Occupy movement to devise an alternative banking system - an "Occupy Bank" - more aligned with the public interest.
    Moyers concludes the broadcast with an essay on what several American cities are doing to restructure Wall Street from the bottom up.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2351] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3015] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    John McLaughlin's One on One [#2745] duration 27:30   TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2104H] OBAMA AND ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN: As President Obama seeks to re-energize his female base, the White House is focusing on the Administration's commitment to women and jobs. Cecilia Munoz, the Director of the Domestic Policy Council talks to TTC about what the administration has done for women.
    GENDER DISCRIMINATION IN GOLF CLUBS: The new IBM CEO, Virginia Rometty, unlike the previous male CEOs of IBM, was not given membership to the Augusta National Golf Club. This renewed the controversy over the club's gender policy.
    THE FACE OF PAY EQUITY: The pioneer for equal pay, Lily Ledbetter, shares her story and thoughts on a future of pay equity for women.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Center for Equal Opportunity Chair Linda Chavez; Progressive Magazine's Ruth Conniff; The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#402] Catching Up on Sleep Science / Landslide Detectives QUEST investigates how sleep affects our minds and bodies, and meet the geologists studying the devastating potential for landslides in the Bay Area. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#230H] Help Wanted In this month's "Help Wanted" edition, NTK travels to Philadelphia to examine the city's ambitious plan to reach out to and re-engage high school dropouts. The story is part of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's "American Graduate" initiative.
    * Princeton economics professor Cecilia Rouse explores how the nation's high dropout rate undermines the nation's competitive position in the world.
    * Jon Meacham contributes an essay on "American Voices."
    Maria Hinojosa anchors.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#113H] Gambling with Your Money You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of mercenary lobbyists, are working hard to diminish or destroy these protections. One of the biggest bull's-eyes is on the Volcker Rule, a section of the Dodd-Frank Law that aims to keep the banks in which you deposit your money from gambling it on their own - sometimes risky-- investments.
    This week, Bill talks with the namesake of the Volcker Rule - Paul Volcker, who served two terms as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1979-1987 and currently heads President Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Volcker contends the rule aims to end conflicts of interest between bankers and their customers. He suggests that former investment companies like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, which sought banking licenses during the economic crisis in order to access federal protection against failing, should now turn in those licenses if they want to do speculative trading. "You shouldn't run a financial system on the expectation of government support. We're supposed to be a free enterprise system," Volcker tells Moyers. "The problem of course is once they get rescued, does that lead to the conclusion they'll get rescued in the future?"
    If all that disillusions you about government, know you aren't entirely powerless to create change. So says Bill's second guest, Carne Ross. Once the rising star of British diplomacy and now a global activist, Ross' book "The Leaderless Revolution" outlines ways to create alternative systems of governance and commerce. "We have to accept that government is no longer fixing things for us. Whoever's in charge, whichever bunch of politicians has taken over government, they will not provide the answer," Ross tells Moyers. "We have to instead take on the burden ourselves. That is a fundamental cultural change, and I think it requires a real examination of our role in political circumstances." Ross, who resigned his British diplomatic role in objection to his government's positions during the Iraq War, shares nine crucial principles for effective citizen action. He also describes his work with the Occupy movement to devise an alternative banking system - an "Occupy Bank" - more aligned with the public interest.
    Moyers concludes the broadcast with an essay on what several American cities are doing to restructure Wall Street from the bottom up.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5141H] * Mitt Romney's victories in Wisconsin, Maryland and Washington, DC. this week pushed him past the halfway mark toward the 1144 delegates needed to clinch the GOP nomination. But the internal battle for the party's nomination continues with Rick Santorum vowing to stay in the race.
    * Meanwhile the real battleground shifted on the national stage this week when President Obama called out Mitt Romney by name and accused him of "thinly veiled social Darwinism" for supporting Republican budget proposals. Mitt Romney countered with sharp criticism of President Obama over his economic record and accused him of shifting his positions to win a second term. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News will explain how Mitt Romney is trying to unite his party as the general election campaign gets underway.
    * For women voters - and the candidates - social issues could be as much of a factor as the economy in the upcoming presidential race. A new USA TODAY/Gallup Poll found President Obama holding an overwhelming lead with women over Mitt Romney. Did the recent political battle over health care and government-sponsored contraception alienate women and widen the gender gap? Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post returns from the campaign trail with analysis.
    * Earlier in the week President Obama's controversial remarks about the Supreme Court's review of his signature healthcare reform law sparked outrage among conservatives who accused Mr. Obama of trying to "bully" the justices. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times will explain why the high court's final decision on the health care law could become a major issue for both parties in the presidential campaign and how the Justice Department is being forced to back up President Obama's comments.
    * First-time applications for unemployment benefits fell last week to the lowest numbers since April 2008 fueling optimism ahead of Friday's release of March's official unemployment numbers. Has the economy found solid footing on the road to recovery? We'll get answers and analysis from David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2351] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3015] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2325H] April 6, 2012 * In the wake of the devastating shooting at Oikos University in Oakland, hundreds of community members attend an international prayer vigil. Meanwhile, Mayor Jean Quan calls for a renewed effort to curb gun violence and improve access to mental health services.
    * Yahoo hands out pink slips to 2000 employees, implementing the most significant layoff in the company's history. New CEO Scott Thompson is expected to make further cuts this year as part of a monumental corporate restructuring.
    * Oil giant Chevron is dealt an unexpected blow as the Contra Costa County Assessment Appeals Board slaps an additional estimated $26.7 million in taxes on its Richmond refinery, claiming the property was previously undervalued by the county.
    * As baseball season kicks off, the San Francisco Giants sign a record $127.5 million deal with All-Star pitcher Matt Cain and unveil plans for "Mission Rock," a new waterfront development next to AT&T Park.
    Guests: Mina Kim, KQED News; Lisa Vorderbrueggen, Contra Costa Times; Kara Swisher, All Things D; and Rachel Gordon, San Francisco Chronicle.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#402] Catching Up on Sleep Science / Landslide Detectives QUEST investigates how sleep affects our minds and bodies, and meet the geologists studying the devastating potential for landslides in the Bay Area. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#108H] The Man Who Invented The Computer Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jane Smiley discusses The Man Who Invented the Computer, John Vincent Atanasoff, with John Hollar, ceo of the Computer History Museum. duration 53:06   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#113H] Gambling with Your Money You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of mercenary lobbyists, are working hard to diminish or destroy these protections. One of the biggest bull's-eyes is on the Volcker Rule, a section of the Dodd-Frank Law that aims to keep the banks in which you deposit your money from gambling it on their own - sometimes risky-- investments.
    This week, Bill talks with the namesake of the Volcker Rule - Paul Volcker, who served two terms as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1979-1987 and currently heads President Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Volcker contends the rule aims to end conflicts of interest between bankers and their customers. He suggests that former investment companies like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, which sought banking licenses during the economic crisis in order to access federal protection against failing, should now turn in those licenses if they want to do speculative trading. "You shouldn't run a financial system on the expectation of government support. We're supposed to be a free enterprise system," Volcker tells Moyers. "The problem of course is once they get rescued, does that lead to the conclusion they'll get rescued in the future?"
    If all that disillusions you about government, know you aren't entirely powerless to create change. So says Bill's second guest, Carne Ross. Once the rising star of British diplomacy and now a global activist, Ross' book "The Leaderless Revolution" outlines ways to create alternative systems of governance and commerce. "We have to accept that government is no longer fixing things for us. Whoever's in charge, whichever bunch of politicians has taken over government, they will not provide the answer," Ross tells Moyers. "We have to instead take on the burden ourselves. That is a fundamental cultural change, and I think it requires a real examination of our role in political circumstances." Ross, who resigned his British diplomatic role in objection to his government's positions during the Iraq War, shares nine crucial principles for effective citizen action. He also describes his work with the Occupy movement to devise an alternative banking system - an "Occupy Bank" - more aligned with the public interest.
    Moyers concludes the broadcast with an essay on what several American cities are doing to restructure Wall Street from the bottom up.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 pm
    Panama Canal: American Experience [#2304H] On August 15th, 1914, the Panama Canal opened connecting the world's two largest oceans and signaling America's emergence as a global superpower. American ingenuity and innovation had succeeded where, just a few years earlier, the French had failed disastrously. But the U.S. paid a price for victory: more than a decade of ceaseless, grinding toil, an outlay of more than 350 million dollars -- the largest single federal expenditure in history to that time -- and the loss of more than 5,000 lives. Along the way, Central America witnessed the brazen overthrow of a sovereign government, a revolutionary public health campaign, the backbreaking removal of hundreds of millions of tons of earth and construction on an unprecedented scale. The story of the canal features a cast of colorful characters ranging from an indomitable President to visionary engineers to tens of thousands of workers from around the world, rigidly segregated by race. Using an extraordinary archive of photographs and footage, Interviews with canal workers and first-hand accounts of life in the Canal zone, director Stephen Ives and producer Amanda Pollak (New Orleans, Roads to Memphis) unravel the story of one of the world's most significant technological achievements. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:30 pm
    Grand Coulee Dam: American Experience Grand Coulee was more than a dam; it was a proclamation. In the wake of the Great Depression, America turned from private enterprise to public works - not simply to provide jobs, but to restore faith. The ultimate expression of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, Grand Coulee played a central role in transforming the Northwest; it was the largest hydroelectric power producing facility in the world when it was completed in March 1941. After WWII, a vast irrigation project made possible by the dam helped turn the barren deserts of central Washington into rich farmland. But the dam prevented access to one of the greatest salmon rivers in the world. Deprived of the salmon - their most important resource - the native people who lived along the Columbia witnessed a profound cultural decline. Featuring the men and women who lived and worked at Grand Coulee and the native people whose lives were changed, as well as historians and engineers, this film explores how the tension between technological achievement and environmental impact hangs over the project's legacy. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1026] Egypt Megan McCormick starts her journey in the sprawling city of Cairo at the bazaar of Khan al-Khalili, open for business since the Middle Ages. From here she visits the mosque at Ibn Tulun, the legendary spot where Noah's Ark came to rest. Megan's next stop is Giza and the Great Pyramids, built as tombs for three Pharaohs. She arrives in the oasis town of Siwa, famous for its dates and olives, stops off in Bahariyya, where she is personally greeted by the mayor, and treks to Luxor for a hot-air balloon ride over the Valley of the Kings. Her final destination is Abu Simbel, the gateway to southern Egypt and home to the massive Sun Temple of Ramses. duration 56:08   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Sunday, April 8, 2012

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too