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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, April 7, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, April 7, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31200Z] Jobs were added in March, but the numbers are still a big disappointment. BNP Paribas' Julia Coronado shares her analysis with NBR Co-Anchor Susie Gharib. From New York to Las Vegas and Miami, a recap of our special coverage of the spring housing market. A Harvard economist talks to NBR Co-Anchor Tom Hudson about the housing outlook. A perspective on real estate from someone who approves and denies mortgages. North Jersey Community Bank President Frank Sorrentino talks to NBR Co-Anchor Susie Gharib. Have you ever had a great idea inspired by a trip to the store? Author and Educator Lou Heckler on finding useful tools in unexpected places. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17097] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10301H] Jobs Report: Less Jobs, Lower Unemployment * Discouraged Workers * The "Bounty" Scandal * Ponnuru & Shields * Blues Legend Buddy Guy duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18075] (original broadcast date: 04/06/12)
    * Ahmed Rashid on "Pakistan on the Brink: The Future of America, Pakistan, and Afghanistan."
    * Peter Beinart of the Daily Beast on "The Crisis of Zionism."
    * Tim Weiner of The New York Times on his book "Enemies: A History of the FBI."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    BBC World News [#98] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2575Z] Tavis talks with four-time Oscar-nominated filmmaker Lawrence Kasdan about his most recent projects, as well as the 20th anniversary of his film The Bodyguard. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10301H] Jobs Report: Less Jobs, Lower Unemployment * Discouraged Workers * The "Bounty" Scandal * Ponnuru & Shields * Blues Legend Buddy Guy duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#1180] duration 59:00   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#413] Micro-Banking Takes Root In Pakistan The first Portuguese settlers landed on the coast of Angola in 1483. This had devastating consequences for the native people, thousands of whom were abducted and shipped to Europe and the U.S. as slaves. Now the Angolan capital Luanda is a booming metropolis, a magnet for a young generation of Portuguese in search of work. The details:
    ANGOLA: THE RISE OF A COLONY - Until 1975, Angola was a Portuguese colony. Independence was followed by a lengthy civil war, which left the country in ruins. Now the tables have turned, and the former colony has become a booming economy and job engine for its former colonial master. 100,000 Portuguese have emigrated to Angola since the Eurozone crisis began. The trade in diamonds and oil has sparked a construction boom in Luanda. Our reporter meets an architect from Portugal who is shaping the new Angola.
    PORTUGAL: THE DECLINE OF A COLONIAL POWER - Along with Greece and Ireland, Portugal was the third EU member to receive an international bailout. It's now deep in recession, forcing a generation to go abroad in search of work. The old and very young are often left behind. Rosy and Anthony Almeida have been taking care of their grandchildren since their daughter Sonia moved to Angola. The children keep in touch with their mother via Skype. She regularly sends money home to pay for the family's upkeep. Even after deep spending cuts, the Portuguese economy is forecast to shrink by over 3 percent this year.
    CLIMATE: BIOMASS BRIQUETTES FROM CAMBODIA - Wood is the main source of energy in Cambodia, which has resulted in widespread deforestation. In response, Carlo Talamanca of Spain has developed an alternative - briquettes made from coconut shells and dried organic waste. The fuel does not use chopped lumber - giving it a clear advantage. The briquettes are inexpensive and burn longer than wood. To reach a wider market, Talamanca is working with a French aid group that turns students into a sales force.
    PAKISTAN: FARMERS BECOME BANKERS - In the mountains of northern Pakistan, conventional bank loans are hard to come by. Microfinance offers an avenue for poor communities to obtain credit. It is based on the principles of solidarity and empowerment. In 2004, the people banded together and started to pool their resources. They decide who will receive credit and what the interest rate will be democratically. Yasmen Akhtarhat used a small loan to expand her garden. Now she sells fruit and vegetables at the market to supplement her family's income.
    duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    European Journal [#3013] A New Anti-Semitism In France FRANCE: A NEW ANTI-SEMITISM - France has been stunned by an Islamist gunman's attack on a Jewish school in Toulouse. The incident showed that France is also vulnerable to homegrown anti-Semitic terrorism. The perpetrator shot dead three pupils and a teacher in cold blood, days after murdering three soldiers. The brutal nature of the attacks has startled people in France. But observers report a worrying trend - a rise in anti-Semitic attacks in recent years. France's Jewish community numbers over half a million, making it the largest in Western Europe.
    GREECE: THE THESSALONIKI MODEL - In crisis-plagued Greece, Thessaloniki is considered an "island of hope. " Mayor Yannis Boutaris, who has been in office for a year, has been pushing ahead with reforms in the city. An independent politician, Boutaris is completely overhauling the city's administration. It now has an auditor, book keeping and a budget plan - things that aren't common in Greek cities. Boutaris says the country must build it strengths, rather than senselessly wasting European Union funds. Thessaloniki's tourism marketing is showing first signs of success. < br />DENMARK: A PARADISE FOR GPS - General practitioners are becoming an endangered species in rural areas of France and Germany. Denmark shows how this problem can be avoided. Denmark has no shortage of general practitioners - a profession that is considered a privilege in the country. But they differ from the cliche of the doctor on call 24 hours a day, devoted to families for a lifetime. Danish GPs have the capacity to give intensive attention to patients when required - occasionally taking time-out to recharge their batteries before returning to service.
    BULGARIA: BISHOPS WITH A SECRET POLICE PAST - The Christian community of Bulgaria is in shock. A number of high-ranking members of the Orthodox clergy apparently worked as agents for the Cold War communist regime. When the communists came to power in 1945, the church came under considerable pressure. The persecution began with the killing of churchgoers and members of the clergy, but later took a more subtle form. Church representatives were recruited as agents - some actually volunteered. With reports now claiming that almost three quarters of the church leadership worked for the Bulgarian secret police, congregations across the country are shocked.
    SPAIN: TOO MANY HORSES - More and more Spanish farmers are giving up raising horses due to the financial crisis. There's hardly anyone willing to take them, so the animals are usually slaughtered- or set free. Spain's biggest horse rescue operation is located in Malaga in Andalucia. When police find abandoned horses, they bring them there. At night the horses pose a big danger on the unlit country roads. Most of the abandoned horses don't have a microchip and can't be slaughtered. Horses with the chips are ending up in slaughter houses more and more frequently, even steeds that once cost 15,000 Euros. Many farmers just can't afford their expensive upkeep anymore.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1532Z] BOSTON BOY CHOIR - On this Easter weekend of great religious music, we visit the Boston Archdiocesan Choir School. It is the only Catholic all-boy choir school in the country and has been described not as a school with a choir, but as a choir with a school.
    PARISH NURSES - "As a parish nurse one of the greatest things we do is be present and just listen," says Diane Tieman of Queen of the Rosary Roman Catholic Church in suburban Chicago. There is a growing number of registered nurses on the staffs of churches of many denominations, helping people with both physical and spiritual care.
    NEW PASSOVER SEDER HAGGADAH - "This haggadah is trying to draw in as many people as possible to participate in the service," says artist Mark Podwal, who describes his illustrations for the text of Sharing the Journey. "For me," says Podwal, "my art is prayer."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#113H] Gambling with Your Money You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of mercenary lobbyists, are working hard to diminish or destroy these protections. One of the biggest bull's-eyes is on the Volcker Rule, a section of the Dodd-Frank Law that aims to keep the banks in which you deposit your money from gambling it on their own - sometimes risky-- investments.
    This week, Bill talks with the namesake of the Volcker Rule - Paul Volcker, who served two terms as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1979-1987 and currently heads President Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Volcker contends the rule aims to end conflicts of interest between bankers and their customers. He suggests that former investment companies like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, which sought banking licenses during the economic crisis in order to access federal protection against failing, should now turn in those licenses if they want to do speculative trading. "You shouldn't run a financial system on the expectation of government support. We're supposed to be a free enterprise system," Volcker tells Moyers. "The problem of course is once they get rescued, does that lead to the conclusion they'll get rescued in the future?"
    If all that disillusions you about government, know you aren't entirely powerless to create change. So says Bill's second guest, Carne Ross. Once the rising star of British diplomacy and now a global activist, Ross' book "The Leaderless Revolution" outlines ways to create alternative systems of governance and commerce. "We have to accept that government is no longer fixing things for us. Whoever's in charge, whichever bunch of politicians has taken over government, they will not provide the answer," Ross tells Moyers. "We have to instead take on the burden ourselves. That is a fundamental cultural change, and I think it requires a real examination of our role in political circumstances." Ross, who resigned his British diplomatic role in objection to his government's positions during the Iraq War, shares nine crucial principles for effective citizen action. He also describes his work with the Occupy movement to devise an alternative banking system - an "Occupy Bank" - more aligned with the public interest.
    Moyers concludes the broadcast with an essay on what several American cities are doing to restructure Wall Street from the bottom up.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2351] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5141H] * Mitt Romney's victories in Wisconsin, Maryland and Washington, DC. this week pushed him past the halfway mark toward the 1144 delegates needed to clinch the GOP nomination. But the internal battle for the party's nomination continues with Rick Santorum vowing to stay in the race.
    * Meanwhile the real battleground shifted on the national stage this week when President Obama called out Mitt Romney by name and accused him of "thinly veiled social Darwinism" for supporting Republican budget proposals. Mitt Romney countered with sharp criticism of President Obama over his economic record and accused him of shifting his positions to win a second term. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News will explain how Mitt Romney is trying to unite his party as the general election campaign gets underway.
    * For women voters - and the candidates - social issues could be as much of a factor as the economy in the upcoming presidential race. A new USA TODAY/Gallup Poll found President Obama holding an overwhelming lead with women over Mitt Romney. Did the recent political battle over health care and government-sponsored contraception alienate women and widen the gender gap? Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post returns from the campaign trail with analysis.
    * Earlier in the week President Obama's controversial remarks about the Supreme Court's review of his signature healthcare reform law sparked outrage among conservatives who accused Mr. Obama of trying to "bully" the justices. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times will explain why the high court's final decision on the health care law could become a major issue for both parties in the presidential campaign and how the Justice Department is being forced to back up President Obama's comments.
    * First-time applications for unemployment benefits fell last week to the lowest numbers since April 2008 fueling optimism ahead of Friday's release of March's official unemployment numbers. Has the economy found solid footing on the road to recovery? We'll get answers and analysis from David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2325H] April 6, 2012 * In the wake of the devastating shooting at Oikos University in Oakland, hundreds of community members attend an international prayer vigil. Meanwhile, Mayor Jean Quan calls for a renewed effort to curb gun violence and improve access to mental health services.
    * Yahoo hands out pink slips to 2000 employees, implementing the most significant layoff in the company's history. New CEO Scott Thompson is expected to make further cuts this year as part of a monumental corporate restructuring.
    * Oil giant Chevron is dealt an unexpected blow as the Contra Costa County Assessment Appeals Board slaps an additional estimated $26.7 million in taxes on its Richmond refinery, claiming the property was previously undervalued by the county.
    * As baseball season kicks off, the San Francisco Giants sign a record $127.5 million deal with All-Star pitcher Matt Cain and unveil plans for "Mission Rock," a new waterfront development next to AT&T Park.
    Guests: Mina Kim, KQED News; Lisa Vorderbrueggen, Contra Costa Times; Kara Swisher, All Things D; and Rachel Gordon, San Francisco Chronicle.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17097] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2104H] OBAMA AND ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN: As President Obama seeks to re-energize his female base, the White House is focusing on the Administration's commitment to women and jobs. Cecilia Munoz, the Director of the Domestic Policy Council talks to TTC about what the administration has done for women.
    GENDER DISCRIMINATION IN GOLF CLUBS: The new IBM CEO, Virginia Rometty, unlike the previous male CEOs of IBM, was not given membership to the Augusta National Golf Club. This renewed the controversy over the club's gender policy.
    THE FACE OF PAY EQUITY: The pioneer for equal pay, Lily Ledbetter, shares her story and thoughts on a future of pay equity for women.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Center for Equal Opportunity Chair Linda Chavez; Progressive Magazine's Ruth Conniff; The Heritage Foundation's Genevieve Wood.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3015] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    John McLaughlin's One on One [#2745] duration 27:30   TVG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#113H] Gambling with Your Money You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of mercenary lobbyists, are working hard to diminish or destroy these protections. One of the biggest bull's-eyes is on the Volcker Rule, a section of the Dodd-Frank Law that aims to keep the banks in which you deposit your money from gambling it on their own - sometimes risky-- investments.
    This week, Bill talks with the namesake of the Volcker Rule - Paul Volcker, who served two terms as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1979-1987 and currently heads President Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Volcker contends the rule aims to end conflicts of interest between bankers and their customers. He suggests that former investment companies like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, which sought banking licenses during the economic crisis in order to access federal protection against failing, should now turn in those licenses if they want to do speculative trading. "You shouldn't run a financial system on the expectation of government support. We're supposed to be a free enterprise system," Volcker tells Moyers. "The problem of course is once they get rescued, does that lead to the conclusion they'll get rescued in the future?"
    If all that disillusions you about government, know you aren't entirely powerless to create change. So says Bill's second guest, Carne Ross. Once the rising star of British diplomacy and now a global activist, Ross' book "The Leaderless Revolution" outlines ways to create alternative systems of governance and commerce. "We have to accept that government is no longer fixing things for us. Whoever's in charge, whichever bunch of politicians has taken over government, they will not provide the answer," Ross tells Moyers. "We have to instead take on the burden ourselves. That is a fundamental cultural change, and I think it requires a real examination of our role in political circumstances." Ross, who resigned his British diplomatic role in objection to his government's positions during the Iraq War, shares nine crucial principles for effective citizen action. He also describes his work with the Occupy movement to devise an alternative banking system - an "Occupy Bank" - more aligned with the public interest.
    Moyers concludes the broadcast with an essay on what several American cities are doing to restructure Wall Street from the bottom up.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Natural Heroes [#505] The Edge of the Sea Since the late 1960's, Puerto Rico's small fishing villages have undergone expansive coastal development, driven by tourism and the growing demand for beachfront property. The Edge of the Sea follows a third generation fisherman in his battle against a developer planning to build a mega condo project on one of Rincon's most popular public beaches. This film explores both sides of the privatization of public areas, and the sensitive social and environmental consequences of excessive coastal development. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:30 pm
    QUEST [#402] Catching Up on Sleep Science / Landslide Detectives QUEST investigates how sleep affects our minds and bodies, and meet the geologists studying the devastating potential for landslides in the Bay Area. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1301] Terry McAuliffe - Green Transportation Terry McAuliffe, chairman of GreenTech Automotive developing and producing environmentally friendly, energy efficient vehicles. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Lost Treasures of the Ancient World [#101] Ancient Rome: The Glorious Empire This episode provides a unique record of the treasures left by the remarkable civilization that was ancient Rome. It includes virtual reconstructions of the Coliseum and the Pantheon, which provide insight into their actual operations and functions in ancient times. duration 48:22   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Community Concern, A This film gives visibility to the power of organizing as a way to improve urban public schools. Across the US, graduation rates in most urban districts still remain between 50 and 60 percent. This documentary is about people who refuse to accept the system's failures, and are working for change. Their spirit, passion and commitment shows that when organizers, parents, youth and educators work together, they are successful. It brings together stories of people facing different challenges, but share similar goals. Included: a story from Oakland, CA, which shows how it is possible for community members, educators, and policy makers to come together to transform their School District. duration 56:50   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Earth: The Operators' Manual Humans need energy. We always have and always will. But if we continue to burn fossil fuels until they're all used up, we'll cook our planet through the inevitable warming effects of carbon dioxide. But we don't have to do that: there are many sustainable energy options. If we look at Earth as if we have an operators' manual, we can create clean energy for a growing population, bring power to the billion and a half who live off the grid, improve the environment and create an age of technological innovation full of new "green" jobs. Hosted by Penn State geologist Richard Alley, and taped on location worldwide (New Zealand, Brazil, China, Morocco and Spain, and all across the United States) the program includes case studies of how and why the US military is reducing its "carbon bootprint," targeting emissions levels and energy efficiencies more ambitious than many nations. The program also looks at wind energy and communities coming back to life in West Texas, and provides hard numbers on how much power we can harvest from other sustainable resources such as solar, geothermal and biomass. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3015] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5141H] * Mitt Romney's victories in Wisconsin, Maryland and Washington, DC. this week pushed him past the halfway mark toward the 1144 delegates needed to clinch the GOP nomination. But the internal battle for the party's nomination continues with Rick Santorum vowing to stay in the race.
    * Meanwhile the real battleground shifted on the national stage this week when President Obama called out Mitt Romney by name and accused him of "thinly veiled social Darwinism" for supporting Republican budget proposals. Mitt Romney countered with sharp criticism of President Obama over his economic record and accused him of shifting his positions to win a second term. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News will explain how Mitt Romney is trying to unite his party as the general election campaign gets underway.
    * For women voters - and the candidates - social issues could be as much of a factor as the economy in the upcoming presidential race. A new USA TODAY/Gallup Poll found President Obama holding an overwhelming lead with women over Mitt Romney. Did the recent political battle over health care and government-sponsored contraception alienate women and widen the gender gap? Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post returns from the campaign trail with analysis.
    * Earlier in the week President Obama's controversial remarks about the Supreme Court's review of his signature healthcare reform law sparked outrage among conservatives who accused Mr. Obama of trying to "bully" the justices. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times will explain why the high court's final decision on the health care law could become a major issue for both parties in the presidential campaign and how the Justice Department is being forced to back up President Obama's comments.
    * First-time applications for unemployment benefits fell last week to the lowest numbers since April 2008 fueling optimism ahead of Friday's release of March's official unemployment numbers. Has the economy found solid footing on the road to recovery? We'll get answers and analysis from David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2325H] April 6, 2012 * In the wake of the devastating shooting at Oikos University in Oakland, hundreds of community members attend an international prayer vigil. Meanwhile, Mayor Jean Quan calls for a renewed effort to curb gun violence and improve access to mental health services.
    * Yahoo hands out pink slips to 2000 employees, implementing the most significant layoff in the company's history. New CEO Scott Thompson is expected to make further cuts this year as part of a monumental corporate restructuring.
    * Oil giant Chevron is dealt an unexpected blow as the Contra Costa County Assessment Appeals Board slaps an additional estimated $26.7 million in taxes on its Richmond refinery, claiming the property was previously undervalued by the county.
    * As baseball season kicks off, the San Francisco Giants sign a record $127.5 million deal with All-Star pitcher Matt Cain and unveil plans for "Mission Rock," a new waterfront development next to AT&T Park.
    Guests: Mina Kim, KQED News; Lisa Vorderbrueggen, Contra Costa Times; Kara Swisher, All Things D; and Rachel Gordon, San Francisco Chronicle.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#402] Catching Up on Sleep Science / Landslide Detectives QUEST investigates how sleep affects our minds and bodies, and meet the geologists studying the devastating potential for landslides in the Bay Area. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1101] Mid-Atlantic States Brianna Barnes begins her travels in New Jersey with a visit to Atlantic City and Wildwoods on a 1950s themed weekend. Next it's on to Delaware, with stops in Lewes and Annapolis, followed by crabbing on the Chesapeake Bay. Brianna journeys through the Brandywine Valley, which stretches through Delaware and Pennsylvania, on her way to Philadelphia for a taste of the famous cheesesteaks and a look at the Art Museum. She continues west through Amish country, takes in the new Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville and checks out the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. Brianna makes her way to Virginia, where she encounters a replica of Stonehenge made entirely from Styrofoam and concludes her trip at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson. duration 55:01   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2411H] Dogs That Changed The World, Pt. 1 - The Rise of the Dog From the tiniest Chihuahua to the largest St. Bernard, all dogs claim the wolf as their ancestor. Using DNA analysis and other research, scientists have now pieced together the puzzle of canine evolution, creating a fascinating picture of some of the essential dogs vital to the canine population. Part one chronicles the evolution of dogs and how they infiltrated human society. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3906H] Hunting The Elements What are things made of? It's a simple question with an astonishing answer. Fewer than 100 naturally occurring elements form the ingredients of everything in our world -- from solid rocks to ethereal gases, from scorching acids to the living cells in our body. David Pogue, lively host of Nova's popular "Making Stuff" series and personal technology correspondent for "The New York Times," spins viewers through the world of weird, extreme chemistry on a quest to unlock the secrets of the elements. Why are some elements, like platinum and gold, relatively inert while others, like phosphorus and potassium, are violently explosive? Why are some vital to every breath we take while others are potentially lethal? Punctuated by surprising and often alarming experiments, Pogue takes NOVA on a roller coaster ride through nature's hidden lab and the compelling stories of discovery that revealed its secrets. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1010] Globe Trekker Special: Best American Hikes Go climb a mountain with the Globe Trekkers! Among the challenges awaiting them include the Grand Tetons in Wyoming, Mount Rainier in Washington and the Sangre de Cristo mountains in Colorado. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, April 7, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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