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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

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KQED World: Sunday, January 29, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, January 29, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1022] Southern Mexico Ian participates in the unique Day of the Dead festival in Pazcuaro. After reveling late into the night, he goes to the old colonial town of Guanajuato, where he spends time with some Mexican cowboys and enjoys delicious Mexican food. From there Ian goes to Acapulco, where he takes in the glitzy nightlife before watching the famous cliff divers. Continuing his search for the perfect beach, he heads to Puerto Escondido for the annual surfing festival. He then travels to the Mayan ruins of Palenque, before visiting the Zapatista stronghold of San Cristobal and ending his journey with an amazing trek through the Lancondon jungle. duration 56:42   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2315H] January 27, 2012 NEWS PANEL:
    * California's sweeping new auto emission regulations, requiring that 15% of new cars sold in the state by 2025 produce little or no smog, could reshape the entire American automobile industry.
    * The city of Richmond wins the intense competition by half a dozen Bay Area cities to be the coveted site of the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's second campus.
    * The 49ers stadium project in Santa Clara hits another snag with a petition drive to put it back on the ballot before voters, a week after the team loses its chance to be in the Super Bowl.
    Guests: Paul Roger, San Jose Mercury News; Amy Standen, KQED's QUEST; and C.W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    OAKLAND MAYOR JEAN QUAN - Scott Shafer talks with Oakland Mayor Jean Quan. Her first year in office has been a turbulent one, with the challenges of the Occupy Oakland movement, the city budget, job cuts due to the loss of state redevelopment funding, and a recall effort.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    QUEST [#309H] Wastewater Woes/Eclipse Chasers QUEST investigates the causes of frequent sewage spills into San Francisco Bay. And journey with the eclipse chasers - adventurers who travel the world to document solar eclipses. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1010] Globe Trekker Special: Best American Hikes Go climb a mountain with the Globe Trekkers! Among the challenges awaiting them include the Grand Tetons in Wyoming, Mount Rainier in Washington and the Sangre de Cristo mountains in Colorado. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Nature [#2906H] Fortress of the Bears Part of the massive Tongass National Forest, Admiralty Island in southeast Alaska supports the largest concentration of bears anywhere in the world. Sustained by a wealth of salmon streams, isolated and protected by their environment, some 1,700 Alaskan brown bears are part of a unique circle of life that has played out here for centuries. Beginning in August, millions of salmon -- pink and chum, coho and sockeye -- return to the island to spawn, providing a feast for the bears, eagles, orcas, sea lions and even the trees themselves. As long as the salmon continue to arrive, all is well. But this year, for the first time, the salmon fail to arrive and the bears get a bitter taste of what the future may hold. duration 56:17   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 am
    Nova [#3904H] Mystery of a Masterpiece In October 2009, a striking portrait of a young woman in Renaissance dress made world news headlines. Originally sold two years before for around $20,000, the portrait is now thought to be an undiscovered masterwork by Leonardo da Vinci worth more than $100 million. How did cutting edge imaging analysis help tie the portrait to Leonardo? NOVA meets a new breed of experts who are approaching "cold case" art mysteries as if they were crime scenes, determined to discover "who committed the art," and follows art sleuths as they deploy new techniques to combat the multi-billion dollar criminal market in stolen and fraudulent art. duration 55:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 am
    Conquistadors with Michael Wood [#104] All The World Is Human In the last segment, the story shifts to the North American continent. In April 1528, 400 conquistadors, dreaming of gold, land in Florida to begin the exploration and conquest of what is now the southern United States. After terrible months of trekking northward, fighting off hostile Indians in the swamps of Florida, they build boats and try to escape to Mexico. Most are never seen again. This is the tale of four survivors shipwrecked on the shores of Texas and in particular that of Alvar Nu many years later. Living among the Indians of the coast for five years, Cabeza de Vaca finally rejoins the three others; together they embark on an epic walk across America to the Pacific coast, reappearing in Mexico eight years after they were lost. Riding through the north Mexican desert, sleeping at prehistoric campsites and staying in caves with the Tarahumara Indians in the wild gorges by Copper Canyon, Wood travels to the Pacific along ancient Indian trails walked by the Spaniards and visits the spectacular Native- American city of Casas Grandes. Cabeza de Vaca, in a book recounting his adventures, came to identify with the Indians against his fellow Spanish and Christians. At the end of this episode, Wood considers how the message of people like Cabeza de Vaca awakened the conscience of Europe about the brutality of the conquistadors, the justice of the conquest and the rights of the native peoples of the New World. duration 56:25   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Need To Know [#220H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 am
    Natural Heroes [#408] Power of Community: How Cuba Survived Peak Oil Cuba, an isolated island nation, rebuilt its quality of life following the collapse of cheap oil, supplied by the former Soviet Union. This fascinating and empowering film shows how communities pulled together, created solutions, and ultimately thrived in spite of their decreased dependence on imported energy. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    QUEST [#309H] Wastewater Woes/Eclipse Chasers QUEST investigates the causes of frequent sewage spills into San Francisco Bay. And journey with the eclipse chasers - adventurers who travel the world to document solar eclipses. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#103H] Big banks are rewriting the rules of our economy to the exclusive benefit of their own bottom line. But how did our political and financial class shift the benefits of the economy to the very top, while saddling us with greater debt and tearing new holes in the safety net? Bill Moyers talks with former Citigroup Chairman John Reed and former Senator Byron Dorgan to explore a momentous instance: how the late-90's merger of Citicorp and Travelers Group - and a friendly Presidential pen - brought down the Glass-Steagall Act, a crucial firewall between banks and investment firms which had protected consumers from financial calamity since the aftermath of the Great Depression. In effect, says Moyers, they "put the watchdog to sleep."
    There's no clearer example of the collusion between government and corporate finance than the Citicorp-Travelers merger, which - thanks to the removal of Glass-Steagall - enabled the formation of the financial behemoth known as Citigroup. But even behemoths are vulnerable; when the meltdown hit, the bank cut more than 50,000 jobs, and the taxpayers shelled out more than $45 billion to save it. Senator Dorgan tells Moyers, "If you were to rank big mistakes in the history of this country, that was one of the bigger ones because it has set back this country in a very significant way."
    Now, John Reed regrets his role in the affair, and says lifting the Glass-Steagall protections was a mistake. Given the 2008 meltdown, he's surprised Wall Street still has so much power over Washington lawmakers. "I'm quite surprised the political establishment would listen to groups that have been so discredited," Reed tells Moyers. "It wasn't that there was one or two or institutions that, you know, got carried away and did stupid things. It was, we all did. And then the whole system came down."
    How Wall Street and Washington got together and stacked the deck against the rest of us, on tonight's show.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#831] Great Investors: Donald Yacktman WealthTrack explores why one "Great Investor" calls the values in the stock market "amazing!" Don Yacktman, founder and co-manager of the Yacktman Fund and a finalist for Morningstar's 2011 Domestic Manager of the Year award, has a history of spotting value. His funds have placed in the top one percent of all large cap mutual funds over the past 3-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year periods. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#126H] Host Ric Edelman details the inherent problems investing in gold, talks with a live audience about rollover IRAs and what young couples should do to start out on the right financial footing. He also interviews economist Bob McCooey about the NASDAQ stock exchange. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2341] 1. Gingrich and Romney neck and neck in Florida.
    2. The last debate before the Florida Republican primary.
    3. The President's combative State of the Union address and the Republican response.
    4. The fight for the Hispanic vote.
    5. The debate over taxes and a starring role for billionaire Warren Buffett's secretary.
    duration 26:46   TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3005] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5131H] This week Mitt Romney released his 2010 taxes and Newt Gingrich released his consulting contract with Freddie Mac, but is that what matters to Florida voters preparing to head to the polls next Tuesday?
    * Thursday night the 4 Republican presidential candidates face off in Jacksonville for the final debate before next week's winner-take-all Florida primary. Romney used Monday's debate to attack Gingrich as an "influence peddler" for his work with Freddie Mac. Gingrich fought back accusing Romney of being an opportunistic venture capitalist and not a true conservative. Gingrich gained momentum with his South Carolina win, but Romney appears to have a stronger organization and resources to win the Sunshine State's 50 delegates. With the economy lagging in their state, what do Florida voters think and are they a good indicator of the national electorate? We will get analysis on the 2-man race for the GOP presidential nomination from the reporters who have been covering the campaigns in Florida: Dan Balz of The Washington Post and John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News.
    * Pivoting off his State of the Union Address, President Obama hit the road this week to push his vision to revive the economy and create jobs. He's maintained a defiant tone during the early stops to 5 battleground states about the need for higher taxes on the wealthy, more incentives for companies to create jobs, and lower taxes on average Americans. Republicans say Mr. Obama's plan is nothing more than class warfare and a strategy by his campaign to win re-election. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times and David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will have analysis of President Obama's plan to address what he calls economic inequalities in America.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2315H] January 27, 2012 NEWS PANEL:
    * California's sweeping new auto emission regulations, requiring that 15% of new cars sold in the state by 2025 produce little or no smog, could reshape the entire American automobile industry.
    * The city of Richmond wins the intense competition by half a dozen Bay Area cities to be the coveted site of the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's second campus.
    * The 49ers stadium project in Santa Clara hits another snag with a petition drive to put it back on the ballot before voters, a week after the team loses its chance to be in the Super Bowl.
    Guests: Paul Roger, San Jose Mercury News; Amy Standen, KQED's QUEST; and C.W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    OAKLAND MAYOR JEAN QUAN - Scott Shafer talks with Oakland Mayor Jean Quan. Her first year in office has been a turbulent one, with the challenges of the Occupy Oakland movement, the city budget, job cuts due to the loss of state redevelopment funding, and a recall effort.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#103H] Big banks are rewriting the rules of our economy to the exclusive benefit of their own bottom line. But how did our political and financial class shift the benefits of the economy to the very top, while saddling us with greater debt and tearing new holes in the safety net? Bill Moyers talks with former Citigroup Chairman John Reed and former Senator Byron Dorgan to explore a momentous instance: how the late-90's merger of Citicorp and Travelers Group - and a friendly Presidential pen - brought down the Glass-Steagall Act, a crucial firewall between banks and investment firms which had protected consumers from financial calamity since the aftermath of the Great Depression. In effect, says Moyers, they "put the watchdog to sleep."
    There's no clearer example of the collusion between government and corporate finance than the Citicorp-Travelers merger, which - thanks to the removal of Glass-Steagall - enabled the formation of the financial behemoth known as Citigroup. But even behemoths are vulnerable; when the meltdown hit, the bank cut more than 50,000 jobs, and the taxpayers shelled out more than $45 billion to save it. Senator Dorgan tells Moyers, "If you were to rank big mistakes in the history of this country, that was one of the bigger ones because it has set back this country in a very significant way."
    Now, John Reed regrets his role in the affair, and says lifting the Glass-Steagall protections was a mistake. Given the 2008 meltdown, he's surprised Wall Street still has so much power over Washington lawmakers. "I'm quite surprised the political establishment would listen to groups that have been so discredited," Reed tells Moyers. "It wasn't that there was one or two or institutions that, you know, got carried away and did stupid things. It was, we all did. And then the whole system came down."
    How Wall Street and Washington got together and stacked the deck against the rest of us, on tonight's show.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2341] 1. Gingrich and Romney neck and neck in Florida.
    2. The last debate before the Florida Republican primary.
    3. The President's combative State of the Union address and the Republican response.
    4. The fight for the Hispanic vote.
    5. The debate over taxes and a starring role for billionaire Warren Buffett's secretary.
    duration 26:46   TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3005] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    John McLaughlin's One on One [#2734] duration 27:30   TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2046H] HILLARY CLINTON WANTS OUT OF POLITICS: Clinton says she is ready to step off "the high wire of American politics."
    NEW REGULATIONS ON SCHOOL LUNCHES: First Lady Michelle Obama supports new regulations to offer healthy lunches in schools while opponents worry about the involvement of government in school food.
    TAMMY BALDWIN FOR SENATE: Rep. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) on her run for Senate, which would make her the first female Senator in the state of Wisconsin.
    Panelists: Global Summit of Women President Irene Natividad; Center for Equal Opportunity Chair Linda Chavez; Former Judge and Federal Prosecutor Debra Carnahan; and Republican Strategist Cheri Jacobus.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    QUEST [#309H] Wastewater Woes/Eclipse Chasers QUEST investigates the causes of frequent sewage spills into San Francisco Bay. And journey with the eclipse chasers - adventurers who travel the world to document solar eclipses. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#220H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#103H] Big banks are rewriting the rules of our economy to the exclusive benefit of their own bottom line. But how did our political and financial class shift the benefits of the economy to the very top, while saddling us with greater debt and tearing new holes in the safety net? Bill Moyers talks with former Citigroup Chairman John Reed and former Senator Byron Dorgan to explore a momentous instance: how the late-90's merger of Citicorp and Travelers Group - and a friendly Presidential pen - brought down the Glass-Steagall Act, a crucial firewall between banks and investment firms which had protected consumers from financial calamity since the aftermath of the Great Depression. In effect, says Moyers, they "put the watchdog to sleep."
    There's no clearer example of the collusion between government and corporate finance than the Citicorp-Travelers merger, which - thanks to the removal of Glass-Steagall - enabled the formation of the financial behemoth known as Citigroup. But even behemoths are vulnerable; when the meltdown hit, the bank cut more than 50,000 jobs, and the taxpayers shelled out more than $45 billion to save it. Senator Dorgan tells Moyers, "If you were to rank big mistakes in the history of this country, that was one of the bigger ones because it has set back this country in a very significant way."
    Now, John Reed regrets his role in the affair, and says lifting the Glass-Steagall protections was a mistake. Given the 2008 meltdown, he's surprised Wall Street still has so much power over Washington lawmakers. "I'm quite surprised the political establishment would listen to groups that have been so discredited," Reed tells Moyers. "It wasn't that there was one or two or institutions that, you know, got carried away and did stupid things. It was, we all did. And then the whole system came down."
    How Wall Street and Washington got together and stacked the deck against the rest of us, on tonight's show.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5131H] This week Mitt Romney released his 2010 taxes and Newt Gingrich released his consulting contract with Freddie Mac, but is that what matters to Florida voters preparing to head to the polls next Tuesday?
    * Thursday night the 4 Republican presidential candidates face off in Jacksonville for the final debate before next week's winner-take-all Florida primary. Romney used Monday's debate to attack Gingrich as an "influence peddler" for his work with Freddie Mac. Gingrich fought back accusing Romney of being an opportunistic venture capitalist and not a true conservative. Gingrich gained momentum with his South Carolina win, but Romney appears to have a stronger organization and resources to win the Sunshine State's 50 delegates. With the economy lagging in their state, what do Florida voters think and are they a good indicator of the national electorate? We will get analysis on the 2-man race for the GOP presidential nomination from the reporters who have been covering the campaigns in Florida: Dan Balz of The Washington Post and John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News.
    * Pivoting off his State of the Union Address, President Obama hit the road this week to push his vision to revive the economy and create jobs. He's maintained a defiant tone during the early stops to 5 battleground states about the need for higher taxes on the wealthy, more incentives for companies to create jobs, and lower taxes on average Americans. Republicans say Mr. Obama's plan is nothing more than class warfare and a strategy by his campaign to win re-election. Jackie Calmes of The New York Times and David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal will have analysis of President Obama's plan to address what he calls economic inequalities in America.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2341] 1. Gingrich and Romney neck and neck in Florida.
    2. The last debate before the Florida Republican primary.
    3. The President's combative State of the Union address and the Republican response.
    4. The fight for the Hispanic vote.
    5. The debate over taxes and a starring role for billionaire Warren Buffett's secretary.
    duration 26:46   TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3005] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2315H] January 27, 2012 NEWS PANEL:
    * California's sweeping new auto emission regulations, requiring that 15% of new cars sold in the state by 2025 produce little or no smog, could reshape the entire American automobile industry.
    * The city of Richmond wins the intense competition by half a dozen Bay Area cities to be the coveted site of the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's second campus.
    * The 49ers stadium project in Santa Clara hits another snag with a petition drive to put it back on the ballot before voters, a week after the team loses its chance to be in the Super Bowl.
    Guests: Paul Roger, San Jose Mercury News; Amy Standen, KQED's QUEST; and C.W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle.
    OAKLAND MAYOR JEAN QUAN - Scott Shafer talks with Oakland Mayor Jean Quan. Her first year in office has been a turbulent one, with the challenges of the Occupy Oakland movement, the city budget, job cuts due to the loss of state redevelopment funding, and a recall effort.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    QUEST [#309H] Wastewater Woes/Eclipse Chasers QUEST investigates the causes of frequent sewage spills into San Francisco Bay. And journey with the eclipse chasers - adventurers who travel the world to document solar eclipses. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#102H] Reality Is Broken Why Games Make us Better and How They Can Change the World. Author Dr. Jane McGonigal in conversation with NPR's Laura Sydell. duration 53:05   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#103H] Big banks are rewriting the rules of our economy to the exclusive benefit of their own bottom line. But how did our political and financial class shift the benefits of the economy to the very top, while saddling us with greater debt and tearing new holes in the safety net? Bill Moyers talks with former Citigroup Chairman John Reed and former Senator Byron Dorgan to explore a momentous instance: how the late-90's merger of Citicorp and Travelers Group - and a friendly Presidential pen - brought down the Glass-Steagall Act, a crucial firewall between banks and investment firms which had protected consumers from financial calamity since the aftermath of the Great Depression. In effect, says Moyers, they "put the watchdog to sleep."
    There's no clearer example of the collusion between government and corporate finance than the Citicorp-Travelers merger, which - thanks to the removal of Glass-Steagall - enabled the formation of the financial behemoth known as Citigroup. But even behemoths are vulnerable; when the meltdown hit, the bank cut more than 50,000 jobs, and the taxpayers shelled out more than $45 billion to save it. Senator Dorgan tells Moyers, "If you were to rank big mistakes in the history of this country, that was one of the bigger ones because it has set back this country in a very significant way."
    Now, John Reed regrets his role in the affair, and says lifting the Glass-Steagall protections was a mistake. Given the 2008 meltdown, he's surprised Wall Street still has so much power over Washington lawmakers. "I'm quite surprised the political establishment would listen to groups that have been so discredited," Reed tells Moyers. "It wasn't that there was one or two or institutions that, you know, got carried away and did stupid things. It was, we all did. And then the whole system came down."
    How Wall Street and Washington got together and stacked the deck against the rest of us, on tonight's show.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 pm
    Nova scienceNOW [#506H] What's The Next Big Thing? What are the technologies most likely to revolutionize life in the future? duration 55:15   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    This Emotional Life [#103] Rethinking Happiness The last episode explores happiness. It is critical to well-being, yet it remains such an elusive goal for many. What is it, why is it important and how can we attain more of it? Viewers meet individuals facing major turning points in their lives - a job loss, a cancer diagnosis, the death of a child, an accident - as well as those facing more common struggles. Viewers discover the latest research that says we often incorrectly predict what will bring greater happiness, leading us to look for it in the wrong places. As the study of behavior turns more toward positive emotions, the episode explores the latest research on the activities and qualities that foster them, such as meditation, compassion, forgiveness and altruism. The series features remarkable stories of resilient individuals whom scientists are studying to learn more about us all, including a man who overcame an abusive childhood to become a renowned surgeon and a Vietnam veteran who survived torture, solitary confinement and seven years as a POW, and yet emerged emotionally unscathed. Understanding why some people have the ability to bounce back after disaster strikes, while others do not, sheds light on how all of us can lead happier, more fulfilling lives. The film ends by coming full circle to the understanding that the quality of our relationships - with friends, family and larger community - ultimately defines our happiness. duration 1:56:22   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1010] Globe Trekker Special: Best American Hikes Go climb a mountain with the Globe Trekkers! Among the challenges awaiting them include the Grand Tetons in Wyoming, Mount Rainier in Washington and the Sangre de Cristo mountains in Colorado. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Sunday, January 29, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
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      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

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    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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