Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, October 24, 2009

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, October 24, 2009
  • 12:00 am
    Worldfocus [#2015] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#29160] * Home Sales Build on First Time Buyer Tax Credit * The UK's GDP is Cause for Concern in the US * Starwood Capital Buys Corus Bank's Condo Portfolio * Market Monitor-Derwood Chase, CIO, Chase Investment Counsel duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    NewsHour with Jim Lehrer [#9583] FLU FEVER - Officials acknowledged Friday there is a shortage of the H1N1 vaccine and confirmed that the virus has spread to nearly every state. For more on the troubles with the vaccine, Ray Suarez speaks with Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health.
    AFGHANISTAN - Margaret Warner speaks with Rory Stewart, a foreign policy expert who also walked across Afghanistan. It is the latest in a series of conversations about Afghanistan.
    BRITISH BLOW-UP - The head of an extreme-right wing political party appeared on a popular BBC talk show this week, sparking a freedom of speech debate across the United Kingdom. Simon Marks reports.
    SHIELDS AND BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks review the top news of the week with Judy Woodruff.
    HIGHEST DUTY - Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, the pilot of "the miracle on the Hudson," discusses his new book, "Highest Duty," with Jeffrey Brown.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#15215] (original broadcast date: 10/23/09)
    * Stephen Roach, Morgan Stanley Asia
    * Peter King of Sports Illustrated
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Bill Moyers Journal [#1327] A damning report from the UN Human Rights Council on the violence in Gaza late last year has put Israel on the defensive. Bill Moyers talks with the man at the center of the storm, Justice Richard Goldstone, who despite working with many pro-Israel groups and Israeli institutions in the past, has drawn intense criticism from some of Israel's supporters for his report, which said Israel's Defense Forces, as well as Hamas, may have committed war crimes in Gaza earlier this year. Goldstone is a renowned war-crimes investigator who's looked into human rights abuses in his native South Africa, as well as the former Yugoslavia, Argentina, and Rwanda. duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 4:00 am
    NewsHour with Jim Lehrer [#9583] FLU FEVER - Officials acknowledged Friday there is a shortage of the H1N1 vaccine and confirmed that the virus has spread to nearly every state. For more on the troubles with the vaccine, Ray Suarez speaks with Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health.
    AFGHANISTAN - Margaret Warner speaks with Rory Stewart, a foreign policy expert who also walked across Afghanistan. It is the latest in a series of conversations about Afghanistan.
    BRITISH BLOW-UP - The head of an extreme-right wing political party appeared on a popular BBC talk show this week, sparking a freedom of speech debate across the United Kingdom. Simon Marks reports.
    SHIELDS AND BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks review the top news of the week with Judy Woodruff.
    HIGHEST DUTY - Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, the pilot of "the miracle on the Hudson," discusses his new book, "Highest Duty," with Jeffrey Brown.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#1815] Legendary entertainer Andy Williams shares stories from his new memoir, including his feelings about being raised during the Depression and his friendship with Robert Kennedy, and reflects on highlights of his career. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#29160] * Home Sales Build on First Time Buyer Tax Credit * The UK's GDP is Cause for Concern in the US * Starwood Capital Buys Corus Bank's Condo Portfolio * Market Monitor-Derwood Chase, CIO, Chase Investment Counsel duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    John McLaughlin's One on One [#2521] duration 27:30   TVG
  • 6:30 am
    This is America with Dennis Wholey [#1304] U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Kathleen Stephens duration 26:46   TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1308] CONVERSATION: THE VATICAN'S NEW POLICY ON ANGLICANS - Bob Abernethy is joined by Kim Lawton and John Allen, senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter to discuss the Vatican's new policy welcoming dissatisfied Anglicans.
    DOCTORS, PATIENTS AND PRAYER - Neurosurgeon Dr. Stephanie Einhaus who was raised Catholic and is now a Southern Baptist was reluctant to pray with patients in the beginning of her career for fear of being ridiculed. But now she is part of a growing trend among physicians who feel more comfortable asking patients if they would like to pray. Bob Faw travels to Memphis, Tennessee to talk with Dr. Einhaus and with cardiac surgeon Dr. Alim Khandekhar, a practicing Muslim, and with scholar Mark Muesse, about praying with patients; its power and its pitfalls.
    PROFILE: MARY SETTERHOLM - Correspondent Lucky Severson traveled to California to meet Mary Setterholm, the US Woman's national surfing champion of 1972, who now owns and operates the Surf Academy in Santa Monica, teaching kids how to ride the waves. But her joy of surfing the waves started with a childhood of heartbreak and tragedy, leading to an adulthood of prostitution and abusive relationships. After a transformational experience, Mary is now giving back and has started a support group for women with deep emotional problems called Serenity Sisters.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Bill Moyers Journal [#1327] A damning report from the UN Human Rights Council on the violence in Gaza late last year has put Israel on the defensive. Bill Moyers talks with the man at the center of the storm, Justice Richard Goldstone, who despite working with many pro-Israel groups and Israeli institutions in the past, has drawn intense criticism from some of Israel's supporters for his report, which said Israel's Defense Forces, as well as Hamas, may have committed war crimes in Gaza earlier this year. Goldstone is a renowned war-crimes investigator who's looked into human rights abuses in his native South Africa, as well as the former Yugoslavia, Argentina, and Rwanda. duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2127] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#4916] Health, wealth, war and national security were front and center this week.
    * The Obama administration's pay czar is ordering a drastic reduction in executive compensation at companies that received federal bailout funds including Bank of America, Citicorp, General Motors and Chrysler. The move comes amid questions about how the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) has operated. In addition, President Obama announced a series of steps to help stimulate small business. Deborah Solomon of The Wall Street Journal will report on the real impact these programs may have on growing the economy and getting taxpayer money back from firms that received government funds.
    * The goal of health care reform is to reduce costs and expand coverage but is that possible without a "public option?" A government-run insurance plan remains one of the main points of contention not only between Republicans and Democrats but among Democrats themselves. New polls indicate most Americans support a government program but what about doctors and health care providers? And will this week's bipartisan defeat of a Senate proposal to boost Medicare payments to doctors prove to be a setback in efforts to pass insurance reform this year? Dan Balz of The Washington Post will have answers and analysis.
    * It took 5 days and nearly 20 hours of negotiations but Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai finally agreed to accept a runoff election next month. Senator John Kerry (D-MA) traveled to Kabul to convince Karzai that reports of voter fraud and corruption raised serious questions and uncertainties about the legitimacy and credibility of his government. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will report on how the runoff election may factor into the White House's decision about troop levels in the war-torn country.
    * David Sanger of The New York Times returns from Vienna where this week Iranian negotiators tentatively agreed to delay the country's ability to build a nuclear weapon. He'll explain why the accord marks a solid first step in helping the Obama administration negotiate a more comprehensive and complicated agreement to reduce Iran's nuclear threat and how the strategy differs significantly from that of the Bush administration.
    * Plus, we pause to remember a WW friend and Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jack Nelson.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2103] October 23, 2009 BUSINESS ETHICS - Our panel discusses the role of ethics in business by examining Attorney General Brown's lawsuit against State Street Bank and Trust for alleged fraud against CalPERS and CalSTRS, and the Galleon Group hedge fund insider-trading scandal unfolding in Silicon Valley. Guests: Andrew Ross, Business Columnist, San Francisco Chronicle, Stu Woo, Reporter, Wall Street Journal, Sally Baack, Professor, College of Business, San Francisco State University.
    LOCAL AUTHOR'S VISIT TO AFGHANISTAN - Solomon, author and Director of the Institute for Public Accuracy, visited Kabul a week after Afghanistan's disputed presidential election in August. Since then, a United Nations investigation found widespread fraud and a runoff election is scheduled for November 7th. Solomon shares his observations and discusses the debate over the upcoming election and the Obama administration's imminent decision on whether to send more US troops.
    SEBASTIAO SALGADO - The exhibition "Then and Now" at the David Brower Center in Berkeley features work by acclaimed photographer Sebastiao Salgado. Salgado is known for images that reveal the human condition - from laborers in Latin America to refugees from war and famine in Africa and elsewhere. In the tradition of social documentary photography, he often makes his work available to social change organizations, such as Doctors without Borders, Amnesty International, and UNICEF. Produced by SPARK for This Week in Northern California.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    Now on PBS [#543] Imagine you lived in a world of water. Your home is 2 feet under. You wade through it, cook on it, and sleep above it. This is the reality for hundreds of thousands of people around the world, coastal populations on the front lines of climate change. Only weeks before world leaders meet in Copenhagen to discuss climate change, Maria Hinojosa travels to Bangladesh to examine some innovative solutions - from floating schools to rice that can "hold its breath" underwater - being implemented in a country where entire communities are inundated by water, battered by cyclones, and flooded from their homes.
    The Denmark conference can't come soon enough. Scientists project global seas will flood 20% of Bangladesh by 2030, stranding some 35 million climate refugees. Some are proposing that industrial nations who contribute to global warming should open their doors to displaced Bangladeshis. Is a coastal catastrophe approaching, and what should we be doing about it?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#1833] INTERNATIONAL VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN ACT: Celebrities and members of Congress are taking action to combat violence against women around the world.
    CATHOLIC CHURCH WELCOMING ANGLICANS: The Vatican is inviting traditionalist Anglicans, who oppose female and openly gay priests, to join the Catholic Church while preserving their religious traditions.
    LATINAS DROPPING OUT: Latina students in the US are at a high-risk for dropping out of school without completing their education.
    Panelists: National Council of Negro Women's Dr. Avis Jones-DeWeever; Former Labor Department Official Karen Czarnecki; Center for Equal Opportunity Chair Linda Chavez; and Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#2743] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2127] duration 26:46   TVG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Bill Moyers Journal [#1327] A damning report from the UN Human Rights Council on the violence in Gaza late last year has put Israel on the defensive. Bill Moyers talks with the man at the center of the storm, Justice Richard Goldstone, who despite working with many pro-Israel groups and Israeli institutions in the past, has drawn intense criticism from some of Israel's supporters for his report, which said Israel's Defense Forces, as well as Hamas, may have committed war crimes in Gaza earlier this year. Goldstone is a renowned war-crimes investigator who's looked into human rights abuses in his native South Africa, as well as the former Yugoslavia, Argentina, and Rwanda. duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 1:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1308] CONVERSATION: THE VATICAN'S NEW POLICY ON ANGLICANS - Bob Abernethy is joined by Kim Lawton and John Allen, senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter to discuss the Vatican's new policy welcoming dissatisfied Anglicans.
    DOCTORS, PATIENTS AND PRAYER - Neurosurgeon Dr. Stephanie Einhaus who was raised Catholic and is now a Southern Baptist was reluctant to pray with patients in the beginning of her career for fear of being ridiculed. But now she is part of a growing trend among physicians who feel more comfortable asking patients if they would like to pray. Bob Faw travels to Memphis, Tennessee to talk with Dr. Einhaus and with cardiac surgeon Dr. Alim Khandekhar, a practicing Muslim, and with scholar Mark Muesse, about praying with patients; its power and its pitfalls.
    PROFILE: MARY SETTERHOLM - Correspondent Lucky Severson traveled to California to meet Mary Setterholm, the US Woman's national surfing champion of 1972, who now owns and operates the Surf Academy in Santa Monica, teaching kids how to ride the waves. But her joy of surfing the waves started with a childhood of heartbreak and tragedy, leading to an adulthood of prostitution and abusive relationships. After a transformational experience, Mary is now giving back and has started a support group for women with deep emotional problems called Serenity Sisters.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    QUEST [#309H] Wastewater Woes/Eclipse Chasers QUEST investigates the causes of frequent sewage spills into San Francisco Bay. And journey with the eclipse chasers - adventurers who travel the world to document solar eclipses. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#603] After a Zorbing adventure the team are at the halfway point of their roadtrip. In Rotorua, they meet with Doug Tamaki, local personality John "Bertie" Cocking, and political blogger David Farrar. After a ferry ride to the South Island, the team meets with mountaineer Mark Ingalls. They head to Christchurch where they talk with Robin Judkins, an artist, author, and creator of adventure racing events. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 2:30 pm
    Natural Heroes [#304] Edward Abbey: A Voice in the Wilderness Known as the "Thoreau of the American West," Edward Abbey, author and essayist is noted for his advocacy of environmental issues and criticism of public land policies. Biography of Edward Abbey as remembered by his family and friends. Location: American West: New Mexico, Utah, Arizona. duration 26:43   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Dakota's Pride A heartwarming documentary about a father's search for the truth about Down Syndrome. Tough questions are posed to a noted Harvard physician Dr. Alan Crocker, the head of the Children's Hospital Boston LEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities) program; a revered national spokesperson for the disability movement; and parents of children with Down Syndrome. The answers are surprising and inspiring. In addition to being informative, this documentary celebrates the successes that have been and can be achieved by individuals with Down Syndrome. duration 28:24   STEREO TVG
  • 3:30 pm
    Charlie's Lake This program delves into a typical year in the life of Jon Whitmer, a man who refuses to allow the day-to-day challenges of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy to slow him. During the course of the program, Jon turns 30, defying doctors who did not expect him to live past the age of 15. Ultimately, the documentary exposes Jon's keys to exceeding his grim prognosis: optimism, a sense of humor and family. Filmed over two years, it provides a glimpse into the realities of one working-class Montana family face as they try to manage Jon's terminal illness with very few resources. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Journey of the Heart: The Life of Henri Nouwen A profile of one of the most significant spiritual leaders of the last 50 years: priest, professor, author and social activist Henri Nouwen (1932-1996). Narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Susan Sarandon, the program is a thought-provoking look at the life of this unassuming, charismatic scholar who wrote passionately and eloquently about humankind's communion of "frailty and brokenness." Seeking a deeper connection to his calling, Nouwen abandoned the insular world of academia to embark on a radical and personal pilgrimage that led him to L'Arche, a community of people in Toronto, Canada with developmental disabilities. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Including Samuel Photojournalist Dan Habib rarely thought about inclusion before he had his son Samuel 7 years ago. Now he thinks about inclusion every day. Habib's documentary examines the educational and social inclusion of youth with disabilities as a civil rights issue. duration 57:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#2743] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2103] October 23, 2009 BUSINESS ETHICS - Our panel discusses the role of ethics in business by examining Attorney General Brown's lawsuit against State Street Bank and Trust for alleged fraud against CalPERS and CalSTRS, and the Galleon Group hedge fund insider-trading scandal unfolding in Silicon Valley. Guests: Andrew Ross, Business Columnist, San Francisco Chronicle, Stu Woo, Reporter, Wall Street Journal, Sally Baack, Professor, College of Business, San Francisco State University.
    LOCAL AUTHOR'S VISIT TO AFGHANISTAN - Solomon, author and Director of the Institute for Public Accuracy, visited Kabul a week after Afghanistan's disputed presidential election in August. Since then, a United Nations investigation found widespread fraud and a runoff election is scheduled for November 7th. Solomon shares his observations and discusses the debate over the upcoming election and the Obama administration's imminent decision on whether to send more US troops.
    SEBASTIAO SALGADO - The exhibition "Then and Now" at the David Brower Center in Berkeley features work by acclaimed photographer Sebastiao Salgado. Salgado is known for images that reveal the human condition - from laborers in Latin America to refugees from war and famine in Africa and elsewhere. In the tradition of social documentary photography, he often makes his work available to social change organizations, such as Doctors without Borders, Amnesty International, and UNICEF. Produced by SPARK for This Week in Northern California.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    QUEST [#309H] Wastewater Woes/Eclipse Chasers QUEST investigates the causes of frequent sewage spills into San Francisco Bay. And journey with the eclipse chasers - adventurers who travel the world to document solar eclipses. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 pm
    Wild Chronicles [#412] Looking Back * News from Nature - Following the surprising discovery of a fossil in a limestone countertop in Italy, National Geographic researchers search for the remains of the first mammals to migrate from Eurasia to Africa. Evidence suggests floods of Asian animals entered Africa through Egypt when the two continents were joined 20 million years ago and evolved over millions of years to become some of today's iconic African animals, including zebras, rhinoceroses, wildebeests and giraffes.
    * Stories from the Wild - Using satellite transmitters, researchers track the daily travels of long-tailed ducks wintering along Nantucket's shores to determine if building a wind farm in Nantucket Sound is a threat to the ducks' habitat. While satellite imagery shows the ducks roost away from the proposed wind farm location, conservationists continue to monitor the birds to learn more about their daily journeys and migratory patterns.
    * Adventure and Exploration - Nat Geo grantee Jon Waterman attempts to travel the Colorado River's almost 1500 miles from start to finish. But the river, siphoned off for industrial use throughout the United States, vanishes underground in Mexico, turning a once lush wetland into a dry wasteland. Forced to walk the rest of the way, Waterman hopes his journey will inspire people to conserve water and truly appreciate the amazing resource.
    * Conservation News - WC travels to Cairo, Egypt where Nat Geo Emerging Explorer Thomas Taha Culhane is helping lower-income Egyptians build solar-powered rooftop water heaters out of recycled trash. Utilizing Egypt's abundant sunshine, the solar heaters improve the quality of life and sanitation, while cutting down on potential energy costs. Culhane hopes the water heater project will lead to other low-tech innovations using recycled materials.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#823] Panama & Colombia Megan McCormick takes a trip through Colombia and Panama, two countries that are refreshingly untouched by mass tourism. In Panama City, Megan tries different Panama hats, which she learns are really from Ecuador but were misnamed as far back as the1850s when Americans were building the railroad during the Gold Rush. She visits the Panama Canal, the crucial byway that generates $1 billion a year for the Panamanian economy. In Colombia, Megan finds herself witness to a point-blank shooting. Undeterred, she decides to learn more about the country's crime-ridden history. She stops by Bogota's police museum to see an exhibition of the infamous drug dealer Pablo Escobar, and then visits the Caribbean coast and the beautiful historic city of Cartagena, where she learns about the city's Spanish colonial past and listens to some of Colombia's most popular rhythms, Vallenato. duration 56:27   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2405] Rhinoceros Millions of rhinos once roamed the Earth. There were hundreds of species of all shapes and sizes. But today, the rhinoceros is one of the planet's rarest animals, with three of its species on the brink of extinction. The program follows a team of experts who are working to protect rhinos from poachers -- relocating them to better habitats and breeding them in captivity. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3616H] Lizard Kings They look like dragons. Armed with sharp teeth, tearing claws and a whip-like tail, these fearsome creatures are not only powerful, they're also smart. Top predators with intelligence, who learn as they hunt, and who use their brain to track down prey, no matter what. Sounds like these cunning hunters should be a big-brained mammal, but these creatures are reptiles, members of a family that evolved when the dinosaurs roamed the earth. They are the largest lizards still walking the planet, the monitor lizards -- the Lizard Kings. duration 55:21   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Warplane [#102] Air Force to Air Power Part 2 examines the innovative air technologies of World War II and the creation of national air forces. The invention of radar and the birth of the fighter ace made airplanes a vital part in wartime tactics. Evolving from their roles as spotters, reconnaissance planes transformed into bombers and fighters became capable of mass destruction. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#813] Pakistan Neil Gibson begins his trip in Karachi, Pakistan's most bustling metropolis. He takes a horse and cart to the Saddar Bazaar, the city's main shopping area, and pays a visit to one of Karachi's leprosy hospitals. Neil journeys by train to Multan, the ancient valley civilization of the Multan, where he has his fortune told by a bird, stuffs his turban with onions and rides by camelback to the spectacular Derawar Fort in the Cholistan desert. He visits the Khyber Pass, the exotic valley of Chitral (birthplace of polo) and stays with the Kalash people, believed to have descended from Alexander the Great. Neil then takes a three-day trek through the Hunza Valley, crossing two incredible glaciers and ending with a view from the magnificent Rush Peak. duration 56:18   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, October 24, 2009

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too