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Secrets of the Dead Previous Broadcasts

China's Terracotta Warriors (Episode #1103)

KQED 9: Sun, Feb 24, 2013 -- 7:00 PM

The extraordinary story of China's 8,000 terracotta warriors begins two centuries before the birth of Christ. The First Emperor of China was preparing an extravagant tomb for his journey into the afterlife, and decreed that he be protected forever by a monumental army. But how was a terracotta army of this size made in less than two years using the technology of 2200 years ago? Led by archaeologist Agnes Hsu, the investigation shows that the Chinese may have used assembly lines to produce the 8,000-strong terracotta army. After the revelation of what the army really looked like when it was buried, archaeologists use biometric analysis to find out if these clay soldiers were individually modeled on living men.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Mon, Feb 25, 2013 -- 1:00 AM

Slave Ship Mutiny (Episode #1004)

KQED World: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 -- 2:00 PM

When the Meermin set sail from Madagascar en route to South Africa on a hot summer's day in 1766, the Dutch crew had no idea they were about to make history. The ship was filled to capacity with human cargo, slaves bound for hard labor building the Dutch colony, Cape Town. But the Meermin with its crew and cargo would never make it to Cape Town. Instead, in a dramatic altercation, the slaves mutinied and managed to overpower the Dutch crew, ordering the ship be sailed back to Madagascar and freedom. But through a sinister act of deception the crew turned the boat around each evening and made full sail for Cape Town. And so the circumstances for a dramatic climax -- and shipwreck -- were laid when the ship and its desperate passengers finally spied land. This program tracks the efforts of archaeologists, historians and slave descendents to discover the full story of this dramatic historical event. They want to learn what happened on the Meermin, how the slaves were able to overpower their captors, and why the ship ended up wrecked on a wild, windswept beach 200 miles east of Cape Town.

Japanese Supersub (Episode #904H)

KQED World: Thu, Feb 21, 2013 -- 7:00 AM

Spring, 1946. Ten months after the end of World War II, an explosion rocked the Pacific off the coast of Hawaii. America had just destroyed one of Japan's most advanced weapons systems. But this was no belated attack against the defeated Japanese. Rather, it was an attempt to keep an advanced, top-secret submarine out of the hands of the Russians. What was this sub and where had it come from? This program investigates, revealing the startling story of Japan's successful creation of a technological masterpiece-an aircraft carrier submarine that could blow up the Panama Canal, reach the US main land undetected, and unleash panic-inducing air attacks on American civilians. How close did Japan's secret sub come to attacking America? And how did America's own top-secret super-weapon put an end to the Japanese threat?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 21, 2013 -- 1:00 PM

Slave Ship Mutiny (Episode #1004)

KQED 9: Wed, Feb 20, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

When the Meermin set sail from Madagascar en route to South Africa on a hot summer's day in 1766, the Dutch crew had no idea they were about to make history. The ship was filled to capacity with human cargo, slaves bound for hard labor building the Dutch colony, Cape Town. But the Meermin with its crew and cargo would never make it to Cape Town. Instead, in a dramatic altercation, the slaves mutinied and managed to overpower the Dutch crew, ordering the ship be sailed back to Madagascar and freedom. But through a sinister act of deception the crew turned the boat around each evening and made full sail for Cape Town. And so the circumstances for a dramatic climax -- and shipwreck -- were laid when the ship and its desperate passengers finally spied land. This program tracks the efforts of archaeologists, historians and slave descendents to discover the full story of this dramatic historical event. They want to learn what happened on the Meermin, how the slaves were able to overpower their captors, and why the ship ended up wrecked on a wild, windswept beach 200 miles east of Cape Town.

Mumbai Massacre (Episode #903)

KQED 9: Wed, Feb 20, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

On November 26, 2008, what began as a typical day in a buzzing cosmopolitan city devolved into a nightmare of explosions, gunfire and death when terrorists attacked. The world watched in horror as the escalating violence was broadcast live across the globe. But within the walls of the besieged hotels, a social networking revolution was taking place. Even as the terrorists watched CNN to find out where their victims were hiding, the prisoners were texting with terrorism experts, passing information to specially set up user-groups, and even searching the web for plans of the buildings to coordinate their escapes. Told completely from the victims' perspective using their own words, voicemails, texts, and user-group postings, this episode places viewers inside the deadly cat and mouse game as it played out.

Slave Ship Mutiny (Episode #1004)

KQED 9: Tue, Feb 19, 2013 -- 11:00 PM

When the Meermin set sail from Madagascar en route to South Africa on a hot summer's day in 1766, the Dutch crew had no idea they were about to make history. The ship was filled to capacity with human cargo, slaves bound for hard labor building the Dutch colony, Cape Town. But the Meermin with its crew and cargo would never make it to Cape Town. Instead, in a dramatic altercation, the slaves mutinied and managed to overpower the Dutch crew, ordering the ship be sailed back to Madagascar and freedom. But through a sinister act of deception the crew turned the boat around each evening and made full sail for Cape Town. And so the circumstances for a dramatic climax -- and shipwreck -- were laid when the ship and its desperate passengers finally spied land. This program tracks the efforts of archaeologists, historians and slave descendents to discover the full story of this dramatic historical event. They want to learn what happened on the Meermin, how the slaves were able to overpower their captors, and why the ship ended up wrecked on a wild, windswept beach 200 miles east of Cape Town.

Mumbai Massacre (Episode #903)

KQED 9: Tue, Feb 19, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

On November 26, 2008, what began as a typical day in a buzzing cosmopolitan city devolved into a nightmare of explosions, gunfire and death when terrorists attacked. The world watched in horror as the escalating violence was broadcast live across the globe. But within the walls of the besieged hotels, a social networking revolution was taking place. Even as the terrorists watched CNN to find out where their victims were hiding, the prisoners were texting with terrorism experts, passing information to specially set up user-groups, and even searching the web for plans of the buildings to coordinate their escapes. Told completely from the victims' perspective using their own words, voicemails, texts, and user-group postings, this episode places viewers inside the deadly cat and mouse game as it played out.

Churchill's Deadly Decision (Episode #1001)

KQED World: Thu, Feb 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM

In the summer of 1940 Winston Churchill faced a terrible dilemma. France had just surrendered and only the English Channel stood between the Nazi's and Britain. Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, one of the biggest in the world. With these ships in his hands, Hitler's threat to invade Britain could become a reality. Churchill had to make a choice. He could either trust the promises of the new French government that they would never hand over their ships to Hitler. Or he could make sure that the ships never joined the German navy by destroying them himself. Secrets of the Dead: Churchill's Deadliest Decision reveals the darkest side of Britain's Finest Hour. Some call his decision a turning point in the war, others call it a terrible betrayal and a war crime. This is the story of what Churchill did next, and why; and how 1,300 French sailors died as a result in what the French still call 'our Pearl Harbour'. In the words of French survivors, some of whom still regard Churchill as a war criminal, and one of the British sailors who opened fire on his former allies, this is the forgotten story of Churchill's deadliest decision - to sink the French Fleet.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Feb 9, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 7, 2013 -- 1:00 PM

Airmen and the Headhunters (Episode #902H)

KQED World: Sat, Feb 2, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

This episode investigates the survival story of a crew of airmen shot down over the jungles of Japanese occupied Borneo during Word War II. A US bomber crew, stranded in a snake infested jungle, was rescued by Dayak tribesmen -- a tribe known for taking the heads of their enemies. The Dayaks fed and protected the airmen before leading them to the base of the maverick British special ops officer, Major Tom Harrisson, who was fighting a guerrilla war against the Japanese with a band of Australian Commandoes. In what is the most unlikely survival story of World War II, the Airmen's hopes of escape were left in the hands of the eccentric Major Harrisson who orchestrated their rescue by building a bamboo runway deep in the Borneo interior.

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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