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Secrets of the Dead Previous Broadcasts

Lost in the Amazon (Episode #1102)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 18, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

This program is a modern day quest to find the truth behind one of exploration's greatest mysteries: what happened to famed adventurer Col. Percy Fawcett, who went looking for a city of gold -- the Lost City of "Z" -- in the Amazon in 1925 and disappeared in the jungles of Brazil forever? New archaeological digs, the science behind the discovery of "newly found" jungle cities and clues collected over the years reveal the fate of Fawcett. The program unravels the truth of what really happened to Fawcett and shares surprising finds that are causing experts to re-think the image of a pristine uninhabited Amazon rainforest: a place that before Columbus, may have had large populations living in sophisticated towns and cities. Fawcett may have actually discovered these ruins fueling his fervor to find the city of gold. Cutting between stylized dramatic Fawcett recreations, old films and archival photos, interviews with family members of Fawcett, jungle villagers and scientists at ancient Indian archaeological sites -- the truth about Fawcett and new understandings of life in pre-Columbian America emerge. Trekking along the paths that Fawcett followed, the search for clues ends at a Xinguano-Kuikuro village in the heart of the Mato Grosso: where a new archaeological discovery may reveal the true location of the Lost City of Z.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 24, 2014 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 19, 2014 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 18, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

The Mona Lisa Mystery (Episode #1305H)

KQED Life: Sat, Jul 12, 2014 -- 3:00 AM

It is the most famous painting in the world, created by the hand of a genius, and marveled at by millions every year in the Louvre in Paris. But the Mona Lisa has a secret history. Using sophisticated scientific analysis we could now solve one of the greatest mysteries in art history: is the Mona Lisa the world knows so well the original version? Or had Leonardo da Vinci painted an earlier version of the iconic portrait?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Jul 13, 2014 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 12, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

Death on the Railroad (Episode #1203)

KQED World: Sat, Jul 12, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

A classic story involving foul play, cover ups, a murder mystery and a voyage of discovery to understand what happened to a group of Irish men who came to America for a better life but found only misery. In 1832, railroad contractor, Philip Duffy, hired 57 Irish immigrants to lay railroad tracks in West Chester, Pennsylvania. But, less than two months after their arrival, all 57 were dead. Did they all die - as was widely believed - due to a cholera pandemic? Or, were some of them murdered? In 2003, twin brothers discovered a secret file among their grandfather's papers that led them to investigate the deaths of these men and find the location of their final resting place in a valley now known as Duffy's Cut. Using the latest forensic and scientific investigative techniques, DNA, forensic analysis, facial reconstruction and historical detective work in Ireland and the USA, modern detectives and experts will unravel this extraordinary story.

The Mona Lisa Mystery (Episode #1305H)

KQED Life: Fri, Jul 11, 2014 -- 9:00 PM

It is the most famous painting in the world, created by the hand of a genius, and marveled at by millions every year in the Louvre in Paris. But the Mona Lisa has a secret history. Using sophisticated scientific analysis we could now solve one of the greatest mysteries in art history: is the Mona Lisa the world knows so well the original version? Or had Leonardo da Vinci painted an earlier version of the iconic portrait?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Jul 13, 2014 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 12, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

Death on the Railroad (Episode #1203)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 11, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

A classic story involving foul play, cover ups, a murder mystery and a voyage of discovery to understand what happened to a group of Irish men who came to America for a better life but found only misery. In 1832, railroad contractor, Philip Duffy, hired 57 Irish immigrants to lay railroad tracks in West Chester, Pennsylvania. But, less than two months after their arrival, all 57 were dead. Did they all die - as was widely believed - due to a cholera pandemic? Or, were some of them murdered? In 2003, twin brothers discovered a secret file among their grandfather's papers that led them to investigate the deaths of these men and find the location of their final resting place in a valley now known as Duffy's Cut. Using the latest forensic and scientific investigative techniques, DNA, forensic analysis, facial reconstruction and historical detective work in Ireland and the USA, modern detectives and experts will unravel this extraordinary story.

The Mona Lisa Mystery (Episode #1305H)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 11, 2014 -- 12:00 PM

It is the most famous painting in the world, created by the hand of a genius, and marveled at by millions every year in the Louvre in Paris. But the Mona Lisa has a secret history. Using sophisticated scientific analysis we could now solve one of the greatest mysteries in art history: is the Mona Lisa the world knows so well the original version? Or had Leonardo da Vinci painted an earlier version of the iconic portrait?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Jul 13, 2014 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 12, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

Death on the Railroad (Episode #1203)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 11, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

A classic story involving foul play, cover ups, a murder mystery and a voyage of discovery to understand what happened to a group of Irish men who came to America for a better life but found only misery. In 1832, railroad contractor, Philip Duffy, hired 57 Irish immigrants to lay railroad tracks in West Chester, Pennsylvania. But, less than two months after their arrival, all 57 were dead. Did they all die - as was widely believed - due to a cholera pandemic? Or, were some of them murdered? In 2003, twin brothers discovered a secret file among their grandfather's papers that led them to investigate the deaths of these men and find the location of their final resting place in a valley now known as Duffy's Cut. Using the latest forensic and scientific investigative techniques, DNA, forensic analysis, facial reconstruction and historical detective work in Ireland and the USA, modern detectives and experts will unravel this extraordinary story.

The Mona Lisa Mystery (Episode #1305H)

KQED 9: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 -- 10:00 PM

It is the most famous painting in the world, created by the hand of a genius, and marveled at by millions every year in the Louvre in Paris. But the Mona Lisa has a secret history. Using sophisticated scientific analysis we could now solve one of the greatest mysteries in art history: is the Mona Lisa the world knows so well the original version? Or had Leonardo da Vinci painted an earlier version of the iconic portrait?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Jul 13, 2014 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 12, 2014 -- 11:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 11, 2014 -- 6:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jul 10, 2014 -- 4:00 AM

Carthage's Lost Warriors (Episode #1303)

KQED World: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

Carthage, the proud capital of the vast Carthaginian Empire, is ablaze. Marauding Romans are mercilessly slaughtering and pillaging. Any survivors face a terrifying fate as slaves on Roman galleys or in their quarries. Escaping the bloody carnage is impossible... or is it? Could some of the once-mighty Carthaginians have got away? And even more incredibly -- could they have turned west on an epic journey across the vast Atlantic Ocean to new shores? Did they set foot in South America, long before Columbus ever walked the face of the Earth?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

China's Terracotta Warriors (Episode #1103)

KQED World: Sat, Jul 5, 2014 -- 11:00 PM

The extraordinary story of China's 8,000 terracotta warriors begins two centuries before the birth of Christ. The First Emperor of China was preparing an extravagant tomb for his journey into the afterlife, and decreed that he be protected forever by a monumental army. But how was a terracotta army of this size made in less than two years using the technology of 2200 years ago? Led by archaeologist Agnes Hsu, the investigation shows that the Chinese may have used assembly lines to produce the 8,000-strong terracotta army. After the revelation of what the army really looked like when it was buried, archaeologists use biometric analysis to find out if these clay soldiers were individually modeled on living men.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Jul 6, 2014 -- 5:00 PM

Carthage's Lost Warriors (Episode #1303)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 4, 2014 -- 1:00 PM

Carthage, the proud capital of the vast Carthaginian Empire, is ablaze. Marauding Romans are mercilessly slaughtering and pillaging. Any survivors face a terrifying fate as slaves on Roman galleys or in their quarries. Escaping the bloody carnage is impossible... or is it? Could some of the once-mighty Carthaginians have got away? And even more incredibly -- could they have turned west on an epic journey across the vast Atlantic Ocean to new shores? Did they set foot in South America, long before Columbus ever walked the face of the Earth?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 -- 1:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 5, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Bones of the Buddha (Episode #1206)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 4, 2014 -- 12:00 PM

This show is a modern day Indiana Jones story: a tale of deception, treasure, intrepid adventurers and international realpolitik. Did a 19th-century British landowner really discover gold, jewels and the charred bones of the Lord Buddha in an underground chamber on his estate? When Colonial estate manager, Willie Peppe, set his workers digging at a mysterious hill in Northern India in 1898, he had no idea what they'd find. Just over 20 feet down, they made an amazing discovery: a huge stone coffer, containing five reliquary jars, over 1000 separate jewels, and some ash and bone. One of the jars had an inscription that appeared to say that these were the remains of the Buddha himself. This seemed to be the most extraordinary find in Indian archaeology. But doubt and scandal have hung over this amazing find for over 100 years. For some, the whole thing is an elaborate hoax. For others, it is no less than the final resting place of the leader of one of the world's great religions, who died nearly 2,500 years ago.

Carthage's Lost Warriors (Episode #1303)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 4, 2014 -- 7:00 AM

Carthage, the proud capital of the vast Carthaginian Empire, is ablaze. Marauding Romans are mercilessly slaughtering and pillaging. Any survivors face a terrifying fate as slaves on Roman galleys or in their quarries. Escaping the bloody carnage is impossible... or is it? Could some of the once-mighty Carthaginians have got away? And even more incredibly -- could they have turned west on an epic journey across the vast Atlantic Ocean to new shores? Did they set foot in South America, long before Columbus ever walked the face of the Earth?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 -- 1:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 5, 2014 -- 2:00 AM

Bones of the Buddha (Episode #1206)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 4, 2014 -- 6:00 AM

This show is a modern day Indiana Jones story: a tale of deception, treasure, intrepid adventurers and international realpolitik. Did a 19th-century British landowner really discover gold, jewels and the charred bones of the Lord Buddha in an underground chamber on his estate? When Colonial estate manager, Willie Peppe, set his workers digging at a mysterious hill in Northern India in 1898, he had no idea what they'd find. Just over 20 feet down, they made an amazing discovery: a huge stone coffer, containing five reliquary jars, over 1000 separate jewels, and some ash and bone. One of the jars had an inscription that appeared to say that these were the remains of the Buddha himself. This seemed to be the most extraordinary find in Indian archaeology. But doubt and scandal have hung over this amazing find for over 100 years. For some, the whole thing is an elaborate hoax. For others, it is no less than the final resting place of the leader of one of the world's great religions, who died nearly 2,500 years ago.

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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