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Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly Previous Broadcasts

Episode #1830

KQED World: Sat, Mar 28, 2015 -- 3:00 AM

* Jim and Jill Kelly - This coming week (March 30-April 1) PBS broadcasts a new Ken Burn series on "Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies," based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Siddhartha Mukherjee. R&E takes you to Buffalo, New York to visit a beloved retired star athlete to talk about cancer, faith, and family. Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly led the Buffalo Bills to a record four consecutive Super Bowls in the 1990s. But off the field, he and his wife Jill have faced some tough challenges, including the death of a terminally ill son, marital problems, and Jim's cancer diagnoses. They say their evangelical faith has given them the strength to persevere.
* Who Is My Neighbor? - In Minneapolis, dozens of retired engineers and other volunteers at Compatible Technology International are making water purifiers, threshers, grain tools, and other inventions designed to improve the lives of poor farmers in small villages around the world. They see it as being good neighbors in a global community.
* Atul Gawande on Being Mortal - Watch our interview with best-selling author, surgeon, and New Yorker staff writer Atul Gawande about aging, dying, end-of-life care, and the limits of medicine - all themes in his latest book Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 30, 2015 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 30, 2015 -- 4:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Mar 29, 2015 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Mar 28, 2015 -- 12:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Mar 28, 2015 -- 7:00 AM

Episode #1829

KQED World: Sat, Mar 21, 2015 -- 3:00 AM

* Selma Civil Rights March 50th Anniversary - After two previous attempts, on March 7 and March 9, 1965 to cross Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge, civil rights marchers left from Brown Chapel AME Church on March 21 under government protection and five days later, on March 25, thousands gathered at the steps of the capitol in Montgomery to listen to Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. speak. "Had it not been for the Lord on our side we would have perished," says Rev. F.D. Reese, a movement leader in 1965 and now the senior pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Selma.
* Average Mohamed - Radical Islamic groups are using high-quality videos to recruit young Muslims in the US and Europe to join their fight. Now, a Somali Muslim immigrant in Minnesota is fighting back with his own videos - an animated series called "Average Mohamed" that counters extremist ideas about Islam. < br>* Baha'i Nineteen-Day Fast - This Saturday (March 20th) marks the New Year for several faith groups, including Hindus, Zoroastrians, and Baha'is. The Baha'i faith began in Persia, now Iran, in the 19th century. There are up to five million Baha'is now around the world, preaching the unity of all people. Baha'is prepare spiritually for their New Year with a nineteen-day fast. We visit a school administrator in Washington, DC, Abdu'l Karim Ewing-Boyd, as he and his family prepare to break their daily sunrise-to-sunset fast.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 23, 2015 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 23, 2015 -- 4:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Mar 22, 2015 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Mar 21, 2015 -- 12:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Mar 21, 2015 -- 7:00 AM

Episode #1828

KQED World: Sat, Mar 14, 2015 -- 3:03 AM

*Syrian Refugees in Turkey - Almost half the population of Syria has been displaced by the violent conflict between the government, rebels, and ISIS. Many Syrians have fled to Turkey, where they rely on support for their basic needs from the government and civilian volunteers, many of them motivated by their Muslim faith. Originally broadcast December 19, 2014.
*Millennials and Religion - We visit Mosaic Church in Hollywood, California, a Christian house of worship that focuses on ministering to the millennial generation, young men and women born in the eighties and nineties. Many of them grew up with no strong religious beliefs, but now they are searching for more meaning in their lives. Originally broadcast November 7, 2014.
* Jean Vanier - This week, French-Canadian humanitarian Jean Vanier received the 2015 Templeton Prize for affirming life's spiritual dimension? in his dedication to helping the mentally disabled live in dignity. Forty-two years ago, in a village south of Paris, he created a home where the mentally disabled could live in dignity and where others could learn from them the value of sharing and acceptance. There is now a worldwide network of these communities called L'Arche, the French word for Ark, a symbol of hope. Originally broadcast May 26, 2006.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 16, 2015 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 16, 2015 -- 4:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Mar 15, 2015 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Mar 14, 2015 -- 12:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Mar 14, 2015 -- 7:00 AM

Episode #1827

KQED World: Sat, Mar 7, 2015 -- 3:00 AM

*Selma Civil Rights March 50th Anniversary - Fifty years ago, civil rights activists organized a march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama to demand the right to vote in that deeply segregated state. When they were violently beaten by police on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, an event now known as "Bloody Sunday," many faith leaders were moved to action. "When you saw black and white moving forward to get rid of segregation, get rid of misuse of people, it made a difference in all America," says movement and march organizer Rev. C.T. Vivian, who famously confronted Selma?'s notorious sheriff, Jim Clark, on the city?'s courthouse steps.
*Recruiting Radical Muslims - Islamic terrorist groups like ISIS and the Taliban are finding some success appealing to young Muslims from Western Europe and the United States. They use the internet and social media to convince uneducated or marginalized men and women they will be rewarded by Allah for joining their cause. While some recruits are drawn by their own extremist beliefs, others are lured in much more deceptive ways. Originally broadcast November 21, 2014.
*B Corp Business Ethics - We talk with three Stanford University schoolmates who co-founded the B Corp, or Benefit Corporation, movement and started a nonprofit organization called B Lab, dedicated to using the power of for-profit businesses to try to solve social and environmental problems. A growing number of states are approving legislation that will make it easier for companies to join the B Corp movement, be certified, and commit to higher standards of purpose and accountability. Originally broadcast October 31, 2014.
*Blind Boys of Alabama - The Blind Boys of Alabama talk about gospel music and the spiritual dimensions of their recent album, I'll Find a Way, produced by Justin Vernon of Bon Iver. The group collaborates here with young musicians, including Shara Worden on the title song. Originally broadcast December 20, 2013.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 9, 2015 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 9, 2015 -- 4:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Mar 8, 2015 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Mar 7, 2015 -- 12:30 PM

Episode #1826

KQED World: Sun, Mar 1, 2015 -- 12:00 PM

*Muslim Initiatives Against Extremism - As Islamic terrorists around the world attempt to recruit young Muslims to join their cause, many US Muslims are coming together to protect their communities from radicalization with new programs. Muslim Public Affairs Council national policy analyst Hoda Elshishtawy says MPAC's Safe Spaces initiative is "creating these safe spaces so that people can talk about issues and grievances that they have and work through them in a healthy way." (Originally broadcast November 14, 2014)
*India's Sacred Cows - Cows are considered sacred by Hindus in India. They were the favorite animal of Lord Krishna, and they serve as a symbol of wealth, strength, and abundance. But people who want to protect these creatures must also deal with those in modern, urban India who think cows are little more than a nuisance. (Originally broadcast February 7, 2014)
*Women's Purim - The highlight of the Jewish celebration of Purim features reading aloud the complex and heroic account in the Book of Esther of Esther'?'s willingness to risk her life to save the Jewish people from annihilation by the King of Persia. Traditionally, among Orthodox Jews the story was read aloud by men. But now Orthodox women are leading Purim services, too. R&E visits a Modern Orthodox synagogue, Washington Heights Congregation in New York City (also known as ?The Bridge Shul?), where the Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance holds its annual reading of the Book of Esther. (Originally broadcast March 21, 2014)

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 2, 2015 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Mar 2, 2015 -- 4:30 AM
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