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Nova Previous Broadcasts

Who Killed Lindbergh's Baby? (Episode #4004)

KQED 9: Wed, Jul 31, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

In the aftermath of his 1927 solo transatlantic flight, Charles Lindbergh became the most famous human being on earth. When he and his wife, Anne, had a son, Charlie, the press dubbed him Little Lindy. On March 1, 1932, kidnappers snatched Little Lindy from the family home near Hopewell, New Jersey. Negotiations stretched out for weeks, but Charlie never returned. His body was discovered not five miles from Hopewell. Now, Nova is reopening one of the most confounding crime mysteries of all time as a team of expert investigators employs state-of-the-art forensic and behavioral science techniques in an effort to determine what really happened to Lindbergh's baby - and why.

3D Spies of WWII (Episode #3903H)

KQED World: Sat, Jul 27, 2013 -- 10:00 PM

Hitler's scientists developed terrifying new weapons of mass destruction. Alarmed by rumors about advanced rockets and missiles, Allied intelligence recruited a team of brilliant minds from British universities and Hollywood studios to a country house near London. Here, they secretly pored over millions of air photos shot at great risk over German territory by specially converted, high-flying Spitfires. Peering at the photos through 3D stereoscopes, the team spotted telltale clues that revealed hidden Nazi rocket bases. The photos led to devastating Allied bombing raids that were crucial setbacks to the German rocket program and helped ensure the success of the D-Day landings. With 3D graphics that recreate exactly what the photo spies saw, NOVA tells the suspenseful, previously untold story of air photo intelligence that played a vital role in defeating Hitler.

Ghosts of Machu Picchu (Episode #3704)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 26, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

Perched atop a mountain crest, mysteriously abandoned more than four centuries ago, Machu Picchu is the most famous archeological ruin in the Western hemisphere and an iconic symbol of the power and engineering prowess of the Inca. In the years since Machu Picchu was discovered by Hiram Bingham in 1911, there have been countless theories about this "Lost City of the Incas," yet it remains an enigma. Why did the Incas build it on such an inaccessible site, clinging to the steep face of a mountain? Who lived among its stone buildings, farmed its emerald green terraces, and drank from its sophisticated aqueduct system? NOVA joins a new generation of archeologists as they probe areas of Machu Picchu that haven't been touched since the time of the Incas and unearth burials of the people who built the sacred site. This program explores the extraordinary trail of clues that began on that fateful day in 1911 and continues to the present.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 26, 2013 -- 11:00 AM

Extreme Cave Diving (Episode #3705)

KQED Plus: Tue, Jul 23, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

Follow the charismatic Dr. Kenny Broad as he dives into Blue Holes -- underwater caves that formed during the last ice age when sea level was nearly 400 feet below what it is today. They are Earth's least explored and perhaps most dangerous frontiers. With an interdisciplinary team of climatologists, paleontologists and anthropologists, Broad investigates the hidden history of Earth's climate as revealed by finds in this spectacularly beautiful "alternate universe."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Jul 24, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Ghosts of Machu Picchu (Episode #3704)

KQED 9: Wed, Jul 17, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Perched atop a mountain crest, mysteriously abandoned more than four centuries ago, Machu Picchu is the most famous archeological ruin in the Western hemisphere and an iconic symbol of the power and engineering prowess of the Inca. In the years since Machu Picchu was discovered by Hiram Bingham in 1911, there have been countless theories about this "Lost City of the Incas," yet it remains an enigma. Why did the Incas build it on such an inaccessible site, clinging to the steep face of a mountain? Who lived among its stone buildings, farmed its emerald green terraces, and drank from its sophisticated aqueduct system? NOVA joins a new generation of archeologists as they probe areas of Machu Picchu that haven't been touched since the time of the Incas and unearth burials of the people who built the sacred site. This program explores the extraordinary trail of clues that began on that fateful day in 1911 and continues to the present.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 26, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Jul 22, 2013 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Jul 21, 2013 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Jul 21, 2013 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 20, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Sat, Jul 20, 2013 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Jul 19, 2013 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jul 18, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

Building Pharaoh's Chariot (Episode #4005H)

KQED World: Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

Around 3,600 years ago, reliefs in Egyptian tombs and temples depicted pharaohs and warriors proudly riding into battle on horse-drawn chariots. Some historians claim that the chariot launched a technological and strategic revolution, and was the secret weapon behind Egypt's greatest era of conquest known as the New Kingdom. But was the Egyptian chariot really a revolutionary design? How decisive a role did it play in the bloody battles of the ancient world? In this film, a team of archaeologists, engineers, woodworkers and horse trainers join forces to build and test two highly accurate replicas of Egyptian royal chariots. They discover astonishingly advanced features, including spoked wheels, springs, shock absorbers, anti-roll bars and even a convex shaped rear mirror, leading one of them to compare the level of design to the engineering standards of 1930's-era Buicks! By driving our pair of replicas to their limits in the desert outside Cairo, NOVA's experts test the claim that the chariot marks a crucial turning point in ancient military history.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Sun, Jul 14, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Sat, Jul 13, 2013 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Sat, Jul 13, 2013 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 11:00 AM

Deadliest Earthquakes (Episode #3801H)

KQED Plus: Thu, Jul 11, 2013 -- 10:00 PM

In 2010, epic earthquakes all over the planet delivered one of the worst annual death tolls ever recorded. The deadliest strike was in Haiti, where a quake just southwest of the capital, Port-au-Prince, killed more than 200,000, reducing homes, hospitals, schools, and the presidential palace to rubble. In exclusive coverage, a Nova camera crew follows a team of US geologists as they first enter Haiti in the immediate aftermath of the tragedy. It is a race against time as they hunt for crucial evidence that will help them determine exactly what happened deep underground and what the risks are of a new killer quake. Barely a month after the Haiti quake, Chile was struck by a quake 100 times more powerful, unleashing a tsunami that put the entire Pacific coast on high alert. In a coastal town devastated by the rushing wave, Nova follows a team of geologists as they battle aftershocks to measure the displacement caused by the earthquake. Could their work, and the work of geologists at earthquake hot-spots around the US, one day lead to a breakthrough in predicting quakes before they happen? Nova investigates new leads in its investigation of a deadly scientific conundrum.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 4:00 AM

Building Pharaoh's Chariot (Episode #4005H)

KQED 9: Wed, Jul 10, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

Around 3,600 years ago, reliefs in Egyptian tombs and temples depicted pharaohs and warriors proudly riding into battle on horse-drawn chariots. Some historians claim that the chariot launched a technological and strategic revolution, and was the secret weapon behind Egypt's greatest era of conquest known as the New Kingdom. But was the Egyptian chariot really a revolutionary design? How decisive a role did it play in the bloody battles of the ancient world? In this film, a team of archaeologists, engineers, woodworkers and horse trainers join forces to build and test two highly accurate replicas of Egyptian royal chariots. They discover astonishingly advanced features, including spoked wheels, springs, shock absorbers, anti-roll bars and even a convex shaped rear mirror, leading one of them to compare the level of design to the engineering standards of 1930's-era Buicks! By driving our pair of replicas to their limits in the desert outside Cairo, NOVA's experts test the claim that the chariot marks a crucial turning point in ancient military history.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Sun, Jul 14, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Sat, Jul 13, 2013 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Sat, Jul 13, 2013 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 12, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jul 11, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Dogs Decoded (Episode #3714)

KQED 9: Wed, Jul 3, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Dogs have been domesticated for longer than any other animal on the planet and humans have developed a unique relationship with these furry friends. We treat our pets like a part of the family and we feel that they can understand us in a way other animals cannot. Now, new research is revealing what dog lovers have suspected all along: dogs have an uncanny ability to read and respond to human emotions. What is surprising, however, is new research showing that humans, in turn, respond to dogs with the same hormone responsible for bonding mothers to their babies. How did this incredible relationship between humans and dogs come to be? And how can dogs, so closely related to fearsome wild wolves, behave so differently? It's all in the genes. "Dogs Decoded" investigates new discoveries in genetics that are illuminating the origin of dogs -- with revealing implications for the evolution of human culture as well. NOVA also travels to Siberia, where the mystery of dogs' domestication is being repeated -- in foxes. A 50-year-old breeding program is creating an entirely new kind of creature, a tame fox with some surprising similarities to man's best friend. This film reveals the science behind the remarkable bond between humans and their dogs and spurs new questions about what this could mean for our relationships with other animal species.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 6, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 5, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 5, 2013 -- 5:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Jul 5, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Thu, Jul 4, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jul 4, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

Manhunt - Boston Bombers (Episode #4014H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Jul 2, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

At 2:50pm on April 15, two bomb blasts turned the Boston Marathon finish line from a scene of triumph to tragedy, leaving 3 dead, hundreds injured, and a city gripped by heartbreak and terror. Less than 5 days later, the key suspects were identified and apprehended - with one dead, the other in custody. How did investigators transform the chaos of the bombing into a coherent trail of clues, pointing to the accused killers?
Nova follows the manhunt step by step, examining the role modern technology - combined with old-fashioned detective work - played in cracking the case. Given hundreds of hours of surveillance and bystander videos, how did agents spot the bad guys in a sea of spectators? Why couldn't facial recognition software I.D. the criminals? How much could bomb chemistry analysis, cell phone GPS, infrared imagery and crowd sourcing reveal about the secrets behind this horrific crime? With the help of top criminal investigators and anti-terrorism experts, Nova explores which technological innovations worked - and which didn't - in the most notorious case of today, and how the world of crime fighting could be transformed tomorrow.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Jul 3, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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