Donate

Nova Previous Broadcasts

Hunting The Elements (Episode #3906H)

KQED 9: Thu, Mar 28, 2013 -- 4:00 AM

What are things made of? It's a simple question with an astonishing answer. Fewer than 100 naturally occurring elements form the ingredients of everything in our world -- from solid rocks to ethereal gases, from scorching acids to the living cells in our body. David Pogue, lively host of Nova's popular "Making Stuff" series and personal technology correspondent for "The New York Times," spins viewers through the world of weird, extreme chemistry on a quest to unlock the secrets of the elements. Why are some elements, like platinum and gold, relatively inert while others, like phosphorus and potassium, are violently explosive? Why are some vital to every breath we take while others are potentially lethal? Punctuated by surprising and often alarming experiments, Pogue takes NOVA on a roller coaster ride through nature's hidden lab and the compelling stories of discovery that revealed its secrets.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Mar 30, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Mar 28, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Mar 28, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

Meteor Strike (Episode #4013)

KQED 9: Thu, Mar 28, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

A blinding streak of light screaming across the Russian sky, followed by a shuddering blast strong enough to damage buildings and send more than 1000 people to the hospital. On the morning of February 15th, a 7000 ton asteroid crashed into the Earth's atmosphere, exploded and fell to earth across a wide swath near the Ural mountains. According to NASA, the Siberian Meteor, which exploded with the power of 30 Hiroshima bombs, was the largest object to burst in the atmosphere since a 1908 event near Siberia's Tunguska river. That time there were few eyewitnesses and no record of the event except for thousands of acres of flattened trees. This time however the event was captured by countless digital dashboard cameras, which have lately become a common fixture in Russian autos and trucks.
Within days, armed with this unprecedented crowd-sourced material, Nova crews hit the ground in Russia along with impact scientists as they hunt for debris from the explosion and clues to the meteor's origin and makeup. To understand how lucky we were this time, we explore even greater explosions in the past, from Tunguska to the asteroid that extinguished the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. This episode puts it all together and asks: Is our solar system a deadly celestial shooting gallery - with Earth in the cross-hairs? What are the chances that another, even more massive asteroid is heading straight for us? Are we just years, months or days away from a total global reboot of civilization, or worse?

Hunting The Elements (Episode #3906H)

KQED 9: Wed, Mar 27, 2013 -- 10:00 PM

What are things made of? It's a simple question with an astonishing answer. Fewer than 100 naturally occurring elements form the ingredients of everything in our world -- from solid rocks to ethereal gases, from scorching acids to the living cells in our body. David Pogue, lively host of Nova's popular "Making Stuff" series and personal technology correspondent for "The New York Times," spins viewers through the world of weird, extreme chemistry on a quest to unlock the secrets of the elements. Why are some elements, like platinum and gold, relatively inert while others, like phosphorus and potassium, are violently explosive? Why are some vital to every breath we take while others are potentially lethal? Punctuated by surprising and often alarming experiments, Pogue takes NOVA on a roller coaster ride through nature's hidden lab and the compelling stories of discovery that revealed its secrets.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Mar 30, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Mar 28, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Mar 28, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

Meteor Strike (Episode #4013)

KQED 9: Wed, Mar 27, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

A blinding streak of light screaming across the Russian sky, followed by a shuddering blast strong enough to damage buildings and send more than 1000 people to the hospital. On the morning of February 15th, a 7000 ton asteroid crashed into the Earth's atmosphere, exploded and fell to earth across a wide swath near the Ural mountains. According to NASA, the Siberian Meteor, which exploded with the power of 30 Hiroshima bombs, was the largest object to burst in the atmosphere since a 1908 event near Siberia's Tunguska river. That time there were few eyewitnesses and no record of the event except for thousands of acres of flattened trees. This time however the event was captured by countless digital dashboard cameras, which have lately become a common fixture in Russian autos and trucks.
Within days, armed with this unprecedented crowd-sourced material, Nova crews hit the ground in Russia along with impact scientists as they hunt for debris from the explosion and clues to the meteor's origin and makeup. To understand how lucky we were this time, we explore even greater explosions in the past, from Tunguska to the asteroid that extinguished the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. This episode puts it all together and asks: Is our solar system a deadly celestial shooting gallery - with Earth in the cross-hairs? What are the chances that another, even more massive asteroid is heading straight for us? Are we just years, months or days away from a total global reboot of civilization, or worse?

Separating Twins (Episode #3908)

KQED Plus: Wed, Mar 27, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

This is the incredible story of Trishna and Krishna, twin girls born joined at the head. Abandoned shortly after birth at an orphanage in Bangladesh, they had little chance of survival, until they were saved and taken to Australia by an aid worker. After two years battling for life, the twins are ready for a series of delicate operations, which will prepare them for the ultimate challenge: a marathon separation surgery that will allow them to live truly separate lives. Surgeons knew there was no guarantee of survival for either of the girls -- but without surgery there was no hope at all. With exclusive access, our cameras have been with Trishna and Krishna and their caregivers throughout their journey.

Cracking Your Genetic Code (Episode #3909)

KQED Plus: Wed, Mar 27, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

What will it mean when most of us can afford to have the information in our DNA - all three billion chemical letters of it - read, stored and available for analysis? As Nova reveals, we stand on the verge of a revolution in medicine, the first effects of which are already upon us. We meet cancer patients returned to robust health and a cystic fibrosis sufferer breathing easily, because scientists have been able to pinpoint and neutralize the genetic abnormalities underlying their conditions. But we also meet ethicists convinced we need to consider the moral dilemmas raised by the new technology. Will it help or hurt us to know that we are likely to come down with a serious disease? What if such information falls into the hands of insurance companies, employers, prospective mates? Should parents be allowed to select embryos with specific characteristics? Both ominous and promising, the new era of personalized, gene-based medicine is one thing for certain: it's relevant to everyone. Because soon you will be deciding whether to join the ranks of those who know what their genes reveal.

Separating Twins (Episode #3908)

KQED Plus: Tue, Mar 26, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

This is the incredible story of Trishna and Krishna, twin girls born joined at the head. Abandoned shortly after birth at an orphanage in Bangladesh, they had little chance of survival, until they were saved and taken to Australia by an aid worker. After two years battling for life, the twins are ready for a series of delicate operations, which will prepare them for the ultimate challenge: a marathon separation surgery that will allow them to live truly separate lives. Surgeons knew there was no guarantee of survival for either of the girls -- but without surgery there was no hope at all. With exclusive access, our cameras have been with Trishna and Krishna and their caregivers throughout their journey.

Cracking Your Genetic Code (Episode #3909)

KQED Plus: Tue, Mar 26, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

What will it mean when most of us can afford to have the information in our DNA - all three billion chemical letters of it - read, stored and available for analysis? As Nova reveals, we stand on the verge of a revolution in medicine, the first effects of which are already upon us. We meet cancer patients returned to robust health and a cystic fibrosis sufferer breathing easily, because scientists have been able to pinpoint and neutralize the genetic abnormalities underlying their conditions. But we also meet ethicists convinced we need to consider the moral dilemmas raised by the new technology. Will it help or hurt us to know that we are likely to come down with a serious disease? What if such information falls into the hands of insurance companies, employers, prospective mates? Should parents be allowed to select embryos with specific characteristics? Both ominous and promising, the new era of personalized, gene-based medicine is one thing for certain: it's relevant to everyone. Because soon you will be deciding whether to join the ranks of those who know what their genes reveal.

Smartest Machine On Earth (Episode #3806H)

KQED World: Thu, Mar 21, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

What's so special about human intelligence and will scientists ever build a computer that rivals the flexibility and power of a human brain? Nova takes viewers inside an IBM lab where a crack team has been working for nearly three years to perfect a machine that can answer any question. The scientists hope their machine will be able to beat expert contestants in one of the USA's most challenging TV quiz shows -- Jeopardy, which has entertained viewers for over four decades. This program presents the exclusive inside story of how the IBM team developed the world's smartest computer from scratch. Now they're racing to finish it for a special Jeopardy airdate in February 2011. They've built an exact replica of the studio at its research lab near New York and invited past champions to compete against the machine, a big black box code - named Watson after IBM's founder, Thomas J. Watson. But will Watson be able to beat out its human competition?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Mar 21, 2013 -- 11:00 AM

Cracking Your Genetic Code (Episode #3909)

KQED World: Thu, Mar 14, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

What will it mean when most of us can afford to have the information in our DNA - all three billion chemical letters of it - read, stored and available for analysis? As Nova reveals, we stand on the verge of a revolution in medicine, the first effects of which are already upon us. We meet cancer patients returned to robust health and a cystic fibrosis sufferer breathing easily, because scientists have been able to pinpoint and neutralize the genetic abnormalities underlying their conditions. But we also meet ethicists convinced we need to consider the moral dilemmas raised by the new technology. Will it help or hurt us to know that we are likely to come down with a serious disease? What if such information falls into the hands of insurance companies, employers, prospective mates? Should parents be allowed to select embryos with specific characteristics? Both ominous and promising, the new era of personalized, gene-based medicine is one thing for certain: it's relevant to everyone. Because soon you will be deciding whether to join the ranks of those who know what their genes reveal.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Mar 14, 2013 -- 11:00 AM

Separating Twins (Episode #3908)

KQED World: Thu, Mar 7, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

This is the incredible story of Trishna and Krishna, twin girls born joined at the head. Abandoned shortly after birth at an orphanage in Bangladesh, they had little chance of survival, until they were saved and taken to Australia by an aid worker. After two years battling for life, the twins are ready for a series of delicate operations, which will prepare them for the ultimate challenge: a marathon separation surgery that will allow them to live truly separate lives. Surgeons knew there was no guarantee of survival for either of the girls -- but without surgery there was no hope at all. With exclusive access, our cameras have been with Trishna and Krishna and their caregivers throughout their journey.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Mar 7, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Comcast/Xfinity Ch10 audio, Monday 7/20 evening

      UPDATE: Comcast was able to resolve their technical glitch apx 10:45pm * * * * * We are aware that at least during the early part of the evening of Monday 7/20, the audio is out of sync on Comcast/Xfinity channel 10, their basic cable service. This problem still exists as of 8:10pm. We have […]

    • KQED DT9s OTA: very brief outages Thurs 6/11/15

      (DT9.1, 9.2 and 9.3) There will be 3 very brief outages (apx. 10 seconds each) of KQED’s Over The Air (OTA) DT9 signal Thurs 6/15, between 10am and 3pm. This is to accommodate preventative maintenance and inspections at Sutro Tower. Most TVs will recover easily each time the signal is restored, but a few viewers […]

    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Friday 3/13

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform more maintenance work overnight, requiring other TV stations to shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Thurs/early Friday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 6am Friday morning. Many receivers will be able to […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave 9 and HD 164
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus / KQET

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave 10
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: IF this channel provided to customer, channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too