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Nova Previous Broadcasts

Who Killed Lindbergh's Baby? (Episode #4004)

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 30, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

In the aftermath of his 1927 solo transatlantic flight, Charles Lindbergh became the most famous human being on earth. When he and his wife, Anne, had a son, Charlie, the press dubbed him Little Lindy. On March 1, 1932, kidnappers snatched Little Lindy from the family home near Hopewell, New Jersey. Negotiations stretched out for weeks, but Charlie never returned. His body was discovered not five miles from Hopewell. Now, Nova is reopening one of the most confounding crime mysteries of all time as a team of expert investigators employs state-of-the-art forensic and behavioral science techniques in an effort to determine what really happened to Lindbergh's baby - and why.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Thu, Jan 31, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 31, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 31, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

Rise of the Drones (Episode #4003H)

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 23, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

A revolution is transforming the armed forces of every nation. Nova launches an investigation of the explosive growth of airborne UAVs or pilotless drones. During the invasion of Iraq in 2003, the US deployed only a handful; now, it has more than 7000. Besides the US, over 40 other nations are now building or buying these increasingly lethal and cost-effective weapons, and it's only a matter of time before a terrorist group turns the technology against Western targets. The latest Predators can track 12 targets at once, trace footprints back to their source and even recognize individual faces. Yesterday's soldiers and pilots put their lives on the line but today, a UAV pilot can "fly" a mission in Afghanistan remotely from a base in Nevada. As one pilot said, after carrying out a strike, "within 20 minutes you can be sitting at the dinner table talking to your kids." That new ability has already saved hundreds if not thousands of US service lives but may make military strikes a more tempting, seemingly risk-free option.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Mon, Jan 28, 2013 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Jan 27, 2013 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 26, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Jan 25, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Thu, Jan 24, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 24, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 24, 2013 -- 5:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jan 24, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

Quest for Solomon's Mines (Episode #3716H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Jan 23, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

Inspired by the Bible's account of the splendor of his temples and palaces adorned in glittering gold and copper, countless treasure-seekers have set off in search of King Solomon's mines. They have trekked through burning deserts and scaled the forbidding mountains of Africa and the Levant. Yet to date, the evidence that's been claimed to support the existence of Solomon and other early kingdoms in the Bible has been highly controversial. In fact, there is so little physical evidence of the kings who ruled Israel and Edom that many contend that they are no more real than King Arthur. During the summer of 2010, Nova and National Geographic embarked on two groundbreaking expeditions to expose new clues buried in the pockmarked desert of Jordan: the ancient remnants of a mass industrial-scale copper mine and a 3000-year-old message from the past with the words "slave," "king" and "judge." These cutting-edge investigations illuminate the legend of Solomon and reveal the source of the great wealth that powered the first mighty Biblical kingdoms.

Secrets of Stonehenge (Episode #3715H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Jan 23, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Every year, a million visitors are drawn to the Salisbury Plain, in southern England, to gaze upon a mysterious circle of stones. Stonehenge may be the best-known and most mysterious relic of prehistory. During the 20th century, excavations revealed that the structure was built in stages and that it dates back some 5000 years, to the late Stone Age. The meaning of the monument, however, was anyone's guess - until recently. Now investigations inside and around Stonehenge have kicked off a dramatic new era of discovery and debate. Who built Stonehenge? What was its purpose? How did prehistoric people quarry, transport, sculpt and erect the giant stones? A new generation of researchers is tackling these questions, finding important clues in the landscape surrounding Stonehenge - one of the densest concentrations of prehistoric structures in the world. The story of Stonehenge is being rewritten.

Quest for Solomon's Mines (Episode #3716H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Jan 22, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Inspired by the Bible's account of the splendor of his temples and palaces adorned in glittering gold and copper, countless treasure-seekers have set off in search of King Solomon's mines. They have trekked through burning deserts and scaled the forbidding mountains of Africa and the Levant. Yet to date, the evidence that's been claimed to support the existence of Solomon and other early kingdoms in the Bible has been highly controversial. In fact, there is so little physical evidence of the kings who ruled Israel and Edom that many contend that they are no more real than King Arthur. During the summer of 2010, Nova and National Geographic embarked on two groundbreaking expeditions to expose new clues buried in the pockmarked desert of Jordan: the ancient remnants of a mass industrial-scale copper mine and a 3000-year-old message from the past with the words "slave," "king" and "judge." These cutting-edge investigations illuminate the legend of Solomon and reveal the source of the great wealth that powered the first mighty Biblical kingdoms.

Secrets of Stonehenge (Episode #3715H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Jan 22, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

Every year, a million visitors are drawn to the Salisbury Plain, in southern England, to gaze upon a mysterious circle of stones. Stonehenge may be the best-known and most mysterious relic of prehistory. During the 20th century, excavations revealed that the structure was built in stages and that it dates back some 5000 years, to the late Stone Age. The meaning of the monument, however, was anyone's guess - until recently. Now investigations inside and around Stonehenge have kicked off a dramatic new era of discovery and debate. Who built Stonehenge? What was its purpose? How did prehistoric people quarry, transport, sculpt and erect the giant stones? A new generation of researchers is tackling these questions, finding important clues in the landscape surrounding Stonehenge - one of the densest concentrations of prehistoric structures in the world. The story of Stonehenge is being rewritten.

Ice Age Death Trap (Episode #3905H)

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 16, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

In a race against developers in the Rockies, archaeologists uncover a unique site packed with astonishingly preserved bones of mammoths, mastodons and other giant extinct beasts, opening a vivid window on the vanished world of the Ice Age.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 19, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 17, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 17, 2013 -- 5:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jan 17, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

Riddles of the Sphinx (Episode #3703)

KQED Plus: Tue, Jan 15, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

The Great Sphinx is disappearing. It would not be the first time in its nearly 5,000 year history that the sands of Egypt have buried this wonder of the ancient world. But today the Sphinx confronts a threat far worse than being blanketed by dunes. The face of the mysterious Pharaoh is being sandblasted to oblivion, its features eroded beyond recognition by whipping winds while its limestone lion's body is dissolved by rising saltwater and sewage and shaken by planes, cars and construction. Now, an international team of archeologists, architects and engineers, led by Zahi Hawass and Mark Lehner, are racing against time to save the Sphinx. With the aid of the most advanced digital 3D model ever constructed, they hope to save the Sphinx before it is too late. Along the way, they'll also solve the riddles that have eluded the rescue missions of Pharaohs, Caesars and Emperors for more than 3,000 years. Who is the Sphinx and what did it symbolize? How was it built, when and by whom? NOVA follows the team to find out if they can reverse the destructive forces of man and nature to save this wonder of the ancient world.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Jan 16, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Decoding Neanderthals (Episode #4002H)

KQED World: Thu, Jan 10, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

Over 60,000 years ago, the first modern humans - people physically identical to us today - left their African homeland and entered Europe, then a bleak and inhospitable continent in the grip of the Ice Age. But when they arrived, they were not alone: the stocky, powerfully built Neanderthals had already been living there for hundred of thousands of years. So what happened when the first modern humans encountered the Neanderthals? Did we make love or war? That question has tantalized generations of scholars and seized the popular imagination. Then, in 2010, a team led by geneticist Svante Paabo announced stunning news. Not only had they reconstructed much of the Neanderthal genome - an extraordinary technical feat that would have seemed impossible only a decade ago - but their analysis showed that "we" modern humans had interbred with Neanderthals, leaving a small but consistent signature of Neanderthal genes behind in everyone outside Africa today.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 12, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 10, 2013 -- 11:00 AM

Doomsday Volcanoes (Episode #4001H)

KQED Life: Thu, Jan 10, 2013 -- 4:00 AM

In April, 2010 the eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano turned much of the northern hemisphere into an ash-strewn no-fly zone, stranding hundreds of thousands of travelers. But Eyjafjallajokull was just the start. Now, an Icelandic volcano 10 times bigger, Katla, has begun to swell and grumble. Two more giants, Hekla and Laki, could erupt without warning. Iceland is a ticking time bomb: When it blows, the consequences will be global. As CGI takes us inside these geological monsters, we meet atmospheric scientists who are working to understand just how devastating an eruption could be -- not just for air travel but for the global food supply and for Earth's climate. Could we be plunged into years of cold and famine? What can we do to prepare for the disaster to come?

Decoding Neanderthals (Episode #4002H)

KQED 9: Thu, Jan 10, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

Over 60,000 years ago, the first modern humans - people physically identical to us today - left their African homeland and entered Europe, then a bleak and inhospitable continent in the grip of the Ice Age. But when they arrived, they were not alone: the stocky, powerfully built Neanderthals had already been living there for hundred of thousands of years. So what happened when the first modern humans encountered the Neanderthals? Did we make love or war? That question has tantalized generations of scholars and seized the popular imagination. Then, in 2010, a team led by geneticist Svante Paabo announced stunning news. Not only had they reconstructed much of the Neanderthal genome - an extraordinary technical feat that would have seemed impossible only a decade ago - but their analysis showed that "we" modern humans had interbred with Neanderthals, leaving a small but consistent signature of Neanderthal genes behind in everyone outside Africa today.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 12, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 10, 2013 -- 11:00 AM

Doomsday Volcanoes (Episode #4001H)

KQED Life: Wed, Jan 9, 2013 -- 10:00 PM

In April, 2010 the eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano turned much of the northern hemisphere into an ash-strewn no-fly zone, stranding hundreds of thousands of travelers. But Eyjafjallajokull was just the start. Now, an Icelandic volcano 10 times bigger, Katla, has begun to swell and grumble. Two more giants, Hekla and Laki, could erupt without warning. Iceland is a ticking time bomb: When it blows, the consequences will be global. As CGI takes us inside these geological monsters, we meet atmospheric scientists who are working to understand just how devastating an eruption could be -- not just for air travel but for the global food supply and for Earth's climate. Could we be plunged into years of cold and famine? What can we do to prepare for the disaster to come?

Decoding Neanderthals (Episode #4002H)

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 9, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Over 60,000 years ago, the first modern humans - people physically identical to us today - left their African homeland and entered Europe, then a bleak and inhospitable continent in the grip of the Ice Age. But when they arrived, they were not alone: the stocky, powerfully built Neanderthals had already been living there for hundred of thousands of years. So what happened when the first modern humans encountered the Neanderthals? Did we make love or war? That question has tantalized generations of scholars and seized the popular imagination. Then, in 2010, a team led by geneticist Svante Paabo announced stunning news. Not only had they reconstructed much of the Neanderthal genome - an extraordinary technical feat that would have seemed impossible only a decade ago - but their analysis showed that "we" modern humans had interbred with Neanderthals, leaving a small but consistent signature of Neanderthal genes behind in everyone outside Africa today.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 12, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 10, 2013 -- 11:00 AM

Doomsday Volcanoes (Episode #4001H)

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 9, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

In April, 2010 the eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano turned much of the northern hemisphere into an ash-strewn no-fly zone, stranding hundreds of thousands of travelers. But Eyjafjallajokull was just the start. Now, an Icelandic volcano 10 times bigger, Katla, has begun to swell and grumble. Two more giants, Hekla and Laki, could erupt without warning. Iceland is a ticking time bomb: When it blows, the consequences will be global. As CGI takes us inside these geological monsters, we meet atmospheric scientists who are working to understand just how devastating an eruption could be -- not just for air travel but for the global food supply and for Earth's climate. Could we be plunged into years of cold and famine? What can we do to prepare for the disaster to come?

Hunting The Edge of Space - The Ever Expanding Universe (Episode #3709H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Jan 9, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

Part 2 of 2: From the discovery that the Milky Way is just one galaxy among billions to the stunning revelation that these galaxies are speeding away from each other faster every second, this episode investigates the universe's distant past - and its future. Now, modern telescopes have added a mysterious new twist to the plot: The vast majority of the stuff of the universe is invisible, tied up in dark matter and dark energy. But what are these mysterious dark forces? A new generation of telescopes is embarking on a mission impossible to see the unseeable and answer one of the greatest unsolved mysteries of the cosmos.

Hunting The Edge of Space - The Mystery of the Milky Way (Episode #3708H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Jan 9, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

In this 2-part miniseries, Nova examines how a simple instrument, the telescope, has fundamentally changed our understanding of our place in the universe. What began as a curiosity - two spectacle lenses held a foot apart - ultimately revolutionized human thought across science, philosophy and religion. The series takes viewers on a global adventure of discovery, dramatizing the innovations in technology and the achievements in science that have marked the history of the telescope. This tale of human ingenuity involves some of the most colorful figures of the scientific world - Galileo, Kepler, Newton, William Herschel, George Hale and Edwin Hubble - leading up to today's colossal telescopes, housed in space-age cathedrals or orbiting high above the Earth. Now at the center of an international space race, a new generation of ever-larger telescopes is poised to reveal answers to longstanding questions about our universe and, in turn, to raise new questions.

Part 1: Three centuries of engineering have produced telescopes far beyond Galileo's simple spyglass. Perched on mountaintops, orbiting the Earth and even circling other planets, these telescopes are revealing the solar system in detail Galileo could only dream of. This episode brings viewers up close with today's most powerful telescopes and embarks on a stunning journey to the planets and moons now being imaged as never before.

Doomsday Volcanoes (Episode #4001H)

KQED 9: Tue, Jan 8, 2013 -- 11:00 PM

In April, 2010 the eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano turned much of the northern hemisphere into an ash-strewn no-fly zone, stranding hundreds of thousands of travelers. But Eyjafjallajokull was just the start. Now, an Icelandic volcano 10 times bigger, Katla, has begun to swell and grumble. Two more giants, Hekla and Laki, could erupt without warning. Iceland is a ticking time bomb: When it blows, the consequences will be global. As CGI takes us inside these geological monsters, we meet atmospheric scientists who are working to understand just how devastating an eruption could be -- not just for air travel but for the global food supply and for Earth's climate. Could we be plunged into years of cold and famine? What can we do to prepare for the disaster to come?

Hunting The Edge of Space - The Ever Expanding Universe (Episode #3709H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Jan 8, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Part 2 of 2: From the discovery that the Milky Way is just one galaxy among billions to the stunning revelation that these galaxies are speeding away from each other faster every second, this episode investigates the universe's distant past - and its future. Now, modern telescopes have added a mysterious new twist to the plot: The vast majority of the stuff of the universe is invisible, tied up in dark matter and dark energy. But what are these mysterious dark forces? A new generation of telescopes is embarking on a mission impossible to see the unseeable and answer one of the greatest unsolved mysteries of the cosmos.

Hunting The Edge of Space - The Mystery of the Milky Way (Episode #3708H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Jan 8, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

In this 2-part miniseries, Nova examines how a simple instrument, the telescope, has fundamentally changed our understanding of our place in the universe. What began as a curiosity - two spectacle lenses held a foot apart - ultimately revolutionized human thought across science, philosophy and religion. The series takes viewers on a global adventure of discovery, dramatizing the innovations in technology and the achievements in science that have marked the history of the telescope. This tale of human ingenuity involves some of the most colorful figures of the scientific world - Galileo, Kepler, Newton, William Herschel, George Hale and Edwin Hubble - leading up to today's colossal telescopes, housed in space-age cathedrals or orbiting high above the Earth. Now at the center of an international space race, a new generation of ever-larger telescopes is poised to reveal answers to longstanding questions about our universe and, in turn, to raise new questions.

Part 1: Three centuries of engineering have produced telescopes far beyond Galileo's simple spyglass. Perched on mountaintops, orbiting the Earth and even circling other planets, these telescopes are revealing the solar system in detail Galileo could only dream of. This episode brings viewers up close with today's most powerful telescopes and embarks on a stunning journey to the planets and moons now being imaged as never before.

Doomsday Volcanoes (Episode #4001H)

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 2, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

In April, 2010 the eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano turned much of the northern hemisphere into an ash-strewn no-fly zone, stranding hundreds of thousands of travelers. But Eyjafjallajokull was just the start. Now, an Icelandic volcano 10 times bigger, Katla, has begun to swell and grumble. Two more giants, Hekla and Laki, could erupt without warning. Iceland is a ticking time bomb: When it blows, the consequences will be global. As CGI takes us inside these geological monsters, we meet atmospheric scientists who are working to understand just how devastating an eruption could be -- not just for air travel but for the global food supply and for Earth's climate. Could we be plunged into years of cold and famine? What can we do to prepare for the disaster to come?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 5, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Jan 4, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Thu, Jan 3, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 3, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 3, 2013 -- 5:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jan 3, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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