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The Fabric of the Cosmos - Universe Or Multiverse? (Episode #3819H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Aug 29, 2012 -- 3:00 AM

Hard as it is to swallow, cutting-edge theories are suggesting that our universe may not be the only universe. Instead, it may be just one of an infinite number of worlds that make up the multiverse. Brian Greene takes us on a tour of this brave new theory at the frontier of physics, explaining why scientists believe it's true and showing what some of these alternate realities might be like. Some universes may be almost indistinguishable from our own; others may contain variations of all of us, where we exist but with different families, careers and life stories. In still others, reality may be so radically different from ours as to be unrecognizable. Greene reveals why this radical new picture of the cosmos is getting serious attention from scientists. It won't be easy to prove, but if it's right, our understanding of space, time and our place in the universe will never be the same.

The Fabric of the Cosmos - Quantum Leap (Episode #3818H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Aug 29, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

Join Brian Greene on a wild ride into the weird realm of quantum physics, which governs the universe on the tiniest of scales. Greene brings quantum mechanics to life in a nightclub like no other, where objects pop in and out of existence and things over here can affect others over there, instantaneously -- without anything crossing the space between them. How could the rules of the quantum world, which work so well to describe the behavior of individual atoms and their components, appear so dramatically different from the everyday rules that govern people, planets and galaxies? Quantu m mechanics may be counterintuitive, but it's one of the most successful theories in the history of science, making predictions that have been confirmed to better than one part in a billion, while also launching the technological advances at the heart of modern life, like computers and cell phones. But even today, even with such profound successes, the debate still rages over what quantum mechanics implies for the true nature of reality.

The Fabric of the Cosmos - Universe Or Multiverse? (Episode #3819H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 28, 2012 -- 9:00 PM

Hard as it is to swallow, cutting-edge theories are suggesting that our universe may not be the only universe. Instead, it may be just one of an infinite number of worlds that make up the multiverse. Brian Greene takes us on a tour of this brave new theory at the frontier of physics, explaining why scientists believe it's true and showing what some of these alternate realities might be like. Some universes may be almost indistinguishable from our own; others may contain variations of all of us, where we exist but with different families, careers and life stories. In still others, reality may be so radically different from ours as to be unrecognizable. Greene reveals why this radical new picture of the cosmos is getting serious attention from scientists. It won't be easy to prove, but if it's right, our understanding of space, time and our place in the universe will never be the same.

The Fabric of the Cosmos - Quantum Leap (Episode #3818H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 28, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

Join Brian Greene on a wild ride into the weird realm of quantum physics, which governs the universe on the tiniest of scales. Greene brings quantum mechanics to life in a nightclub like no other, where objects pop in and out of existence and things over here can affect others over there, instantaneously -- without anything crossing the space between them. How could the rules of the quantum world, which work so well to describe the behavior of individual atoms and their components, appear so dramatically different from the everyday rules that govern people, planets and galaxies? Quantu m mechanics may be counterintuitive, but it's one of the most successful theories in the history of science, making predictions that have been confirmed to better than one part in a billion, while also launching the technological advances at the heart of modern life, like computers and cell phones. But even today, even with such profound successes, the debate still rages over what quantum mechanics implies for the true nature of reality.

The Fabric of the Cosmos - The Illusion of Time (Episode #3817H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Aug 8, 2012 -- 3:00 AM

Time. We waste it, save it, kill it, make it. The world runs on it. Yet, ask physicists what time actually is, and the answer might shock you: They have no idea. Even more surprising, the deep sense we have of time passing from present to past may be nothing more than an illusion. How can our understanding of something so familiar be so wrong? In search of answers, Brian Greene takes us on the ultimate time traveling adventure, hurtling 50 years into the future before stepping into a wormhole to travel back to the past. Along the way, he will reveal a new way of thinking about time in which moments past, present and future exist all at once. This journey will bring us all the way back to the Big Bang, where physicists think the ultimate secrets of time may be hidden.

The Fabric of the Cosmos - What Is Space? (Episode #3816H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Aug 8, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

Space. It separates you from me, one galaxy from the next and atoms from each other. It is everywhere in the universe. But to most of us, space is nothing, an empty void. Well, it turns out space is not what it seems. From the passenger seat of a New York cab driving near the speed of light to a pool hall where billiard tables do fantastical things, Greene reveals space as a dynamic fabric that can stretch, twist, warp and ripple under the influence of gravity. Stranger still is a newly discovered ingredient of space that actually makes up 70% of the universe. Physicists call it dark energy because while they know it's out there, driving space to expand ever more quickly, they have no idea what it is. Probing space on the smallest scales only makes the mysteries multiply down there; things are going on that physicists today can barely fathom. To top it off, some of the strangest places in space, black holes, have led scientists to propose that like the hologram on your credit card, space may just be a projection of a deeper two-dimensional reality, taking place on a distant surface that surrounds us. Space, far from being empty, is filled with some of the deepest mysteries of our times.

The Fabric of the Cosmos - The Illusion of Time (Episode #3817H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 7, 2012 -- 9:00 PM

Time. We waste it, save it, kill it, make it. The world runs on it. Yet, ask physicists what time actually is, and the answer might shock you: They have no idea. Even more surprising, the deep sense we have of time passing from present to past may be nothing more than an illusion. How can our understanding of something so familiar be so wrong? In search of answers, Brian Greene takes us on the ultimate time traveling adventure, hurtling 50 years into the future before stepping into a wormhole to travel back to the past. Along the way, he will reveal a new way of thinking about time in which moments past, present and future exist all at once. This journey will bring us all the way back to the Big Bang, where physicists think the ultimate secrets of time may be hidden.

The Fabric of the Cosmos - What Is Space? (Episode #3816H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 7, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

Space. It separates you from me, one galaxy from the next and atoms from each other. It is everywhere in the universe. But to most of us, space is nothing, an empty void. Well, it turns out space is not what it seems. From the passenger seat of a New York cab driving near the speed of light to a pool hall where billiard tables do fantastical things, Greene reveals space as a dynamic fabric that can stretch, twist, warp and ripple under the influence of gravity. Stranger still is a newly discovered ingredient of space that actually makes up 70% of the universe. Physicists call it dark energy because while they know it's out there, driving space to expand ever more quickly, they have no idea what it is. Probing space on the smallest scales only makes the mysteries multiply down there; things are going on that physicists today can barely fathom. To top it off, some of the strangest places in space, black holes, have led scientists to propose that like the hologram on your credit card, space may just be a projection of a deeper two-dimensional reality, taking place on a distant surface that surrounds us. Space, far from being empty, is filled with some of the deepest mysteries of our times.

The Elegant Universe: Welcome to the 11th Dimension (Episode #3014Z)

KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 4:00 AM

Part 3 of 3: The third and final episode of "The Elegant Univserse" shows how in 1995 Edward Witten of Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, aided by others, revolutionized string theory by successfully uniting the five different versions into a single theory that is cryptically named "M-theory," a development that required a total of 11 dimensions. Ten... 11... who's counting? But the new 11th dimension is different from all the others, since it implies that strings can come in higher dimensional shapes called membranes, or "branes" for short. These possess truly science-fiction-like qualities, since in principle they can be as large as the universe. A brane can even be a universe - a parallel universe - and we may be living in one right now.

The Elegant Universe: The String's The Thing (Episode #3013Z)

KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 3:00 AM

Part 2 of 3: The second hour opens with a whimsical movie scene in which the history of the universe runs backwards to the Big Bang, the moment at which general relativity and quantum mechanics both come into play - therefore the point at which the conventional model of reality breaks down. Then it's string theory to the rescue as Greene describes the serendipitous steps that led from a forgotten 200-year-old mathematical formula to the first glimmerings of strings - quivering strands of energy whose different vibrations give rise to quarks, electrons, photons and all other elementary particles. Strings are truly tiny - smaller than an atomby the same factor that a tree is smaller than the entire universe. But, as Greene explains, it is possible - for the first time ever - to combine the laws of the large and the laws of the small into a proposal for a single, harmonious Theory of Everything.

The Elegant Universe: Einstein's Dream (Episode #3012Z)

KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

The Elegant Universe -- In the last few years, excitement has grown among scientists as they've pursued a revolutionary new approach to unifying nature's forces. To the uninitiated, string theory is totally mind-boggling. But physicist Brian Greene has a rare gift for conveying physics in vivid everyday images, a gift that has turned his recent book, The Elegant Universe, into a mighty bestseller. Now Greene brings his talent, youth and vitality to television for the first time in this special three-hour presentation. A highly innovative, Matrix-like production style makes the surreal world of string theory spring to life on the screen.

The first hour introduces string theory and shows how modern physics -composed of two theories that are ferociously incompatible - reached an impasse: one theory, known as general relativity, is successful in describing big things like stars and galaxies; another, called quantum mechanics, is equally successful in describing small things like atoms and subatomic particles. Albert Einstein, the inventor of general relativity, dreamed of finding a single theory that would embrace all of nature's laws. But in his quest for the so- called unified theory, Einstein came up empty-handed, and the conflict between general relativity and quantum mechanics has stymied all who' ve followed. That is, until the discovery of string theory.

The Elegant Universe: Welcome to the 11th Dimension (Episode #3014Z)

KQED Plus: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 10:00 PM

Part 3 of 3: The third and final episode of "The Elegant Univserse" shows how in 1995 Edward Witten of Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, aided by others, revolutionized string theory by successfully uniting the five different versions into a single theory that is cryptically named "M-theory," a development that required a total of 11 dimensions. Ten... 11... who's counting? But the new 11th dimension is different from all the others, since it implies that strings can come in higher dimensional shapes called membranes, or "branes" for short. These possess truly science-fiction-like qualities, since in principle they can be as large as the universe. A brane can even be a universe - a parallel universe - and we may be living in one right now.

The Elegant Universe: The String's The Thing (Episode #3013Z)

KQED Plus: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 9:00 PM

Part 2 of 3: The second hour opens with a whimsical movie scene in which the history of the universe runs backwards to the Big Bang, the moment at which general relativity and quantum mechanics both come into play - therefore the point at which the conventional model of reality breaks down. Then it's string theory to the rescue as Greene describes the serendipitous steps that led from a forgotten 200-year-old mathematical formula to the first glimmerings of strings - quivering strands of energy whose different vibrations give rise to quarks, electrons, photons and all other elementary particles. Strings are truly tiny - smaller than an atomby the same factor that a tree is smaller than the entire universe. But, as Greene explains, it is possible - for the first time ever - to combine the laws of the large and the laws of the small into a proposal for a single, harmonious Theory of Everything.

The Elegant Universe: Einstein's Dream (Episode #3012Z)

KQED Plus: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 8:00 PM

The Elegant Universe -- In the last few years, excitement has grown among scientists as they've pursued a revolutionary new approach to unifying nature's forces. To the uninitiated, string theory is totally mind-boggling. But physicist Brian Greene has a rare gift for conveying physics in vivid everyday images, a gift that has turned his recent book, The Elegant Universe, into a mighty bestseller. Now Greene brings his talent, youth and vitality to television for the first time in this special three-hour presentation. A highly innovative, Matrix-like production style makes the surreal world of string theory spring to life on the screen.

The first hour introduces string theory and shows how modern physics -composed of two theories that are ferociously incompatible - reached an impasse: one theory, known as general relativity, is successful in describing big things like stars and galaxies; another, called quantum mechanics, is equally successful in describing small things like atoms and subatomic particles. Albert Einstein, the inventor of general relativity, dreamed of finding a single theory that would embrace all of nature's laws. But in his quest for the so- called unified theory, Einstein came up empty-handed, and the conflict between general relativity and quantum mechanics has stymied all who' ve followed. That is, until the discovery of string theory.

Hunting The Edge of Space - The Ever Expanding Universe (Episode #3709H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Aug 1, 2012 -- 3:00 AM

Part 2 of 2: From the discovery that the Milky Way is just one galaxy among billions to the stunning revelation that these galaxies are speeding away from each other faster every second, this episode investigates the universe's distant past - and its future. Now, modern telescopes have added a mysterious new twist to the plot: The vast majority of the stuff of the universe is invisible, tied up in dark matter and dark energy. But what are these mysterious dark forces? A new generation of telescopes is embarking on a mission impossible to see the unseeable and answer one of the greatest unsolved mysteries of the cosmos.

Hunting The Edge of Space - The Mystery of the Milky Way (Episode #3708H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Aug 1, 2012 -- 2:00 AM

In this 2-part miniseries, Nova examines how a simple instrument, the telescope, has fundamentally changed our understanding of our place in the universe. What began as a curiosity - two spectacle lenses held a foot apart - ultimately revolutionized human thought across science, philosophy and religion. The series takes viewers on a global adventure of discovery, dramatizing the innovations in technology and the achievements in science that have marked the history of the telescope. This tale of human ingenuity involves some of the most colorful figures of the scientific world - Galileo, Kepler, Newton, William Herschel, George Hale and Edwin Hubble - leading up to today's colossal telescopes, housed in space-age cathedrals or orbiting high above the Earth. Now at the center of an international space race, a new generation of ever-larger telescopes is poised to reveal answers to longstanding questions about our universe and, in turn, to raise new questions.

Part 1: Three centuries of engineering have produced telescopes far beyond Galileo's simple spyglass. Perched on mountaintops, orbiting the Earth and even circling other planets, these telescopes are revealing the solar system in detail Galileo could only dream of. This episode brings viewers up close with today's most powerful telescopes and embarks on a stunning journey to the planets and moons now being imaged as never before.

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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