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Focus On Europe Previous Broadcasts

Turkey Reignites Kurdish Anger (Episode #3242)

KQED World: Sat, Oct 18, 2014 -- 8:30 AM

Turkey: Reigniting Kurdish Anger - Kurds in Turkey are keen to support the Kurdish fighters resisting the advancing IS militants in northern Syria, but Ankara refuses to allow them to cross into Syria. At least 19 people have been killed in recent clashes involving Kurdish protesters in Turkey. The situation has reignited the Turkish-Kurdish conflict, with the Kurds accusing the Turkish government of abandoning them in the fight against IS militants. Kurds were long repressed in Turkey, and even though peace talks with the banned PKK were launched recently in a step towards ending a three-decade conflict, the peace process remains fragile. Germany: A Haven for Jewish Immigrants - Increasing numbers of Jews from all over the world are moving to the German capital. But while Berlin's Jewish community is swelling, Jews in other European countries are facing growing hostility and opting to immigrate to Israel. The repercussions of the recent Israel-Gaza conflict are even being felt in Europe. Anti-Semitic demonstrations took place in recent months in London, Paris and Stockholm, often resulting in skirmishes. Recent years have seen Germany become a popular destination for Jewish immigrants. The younger generation in particular has been flocking to Berlin. Croatia: Tito's Murder Squads - Josip Perkovic, the former Croatian secret police chief, is to stand trial in Germany. Earlier this year, Zagreb agreed to extradite him on the basis of a European arrest warrant. Perkovic is accused of involvement in the death in 1983 of a Croatian dissident near Munich. Perkovic is charged with being complicit in the murder. The victim was a member of a number of Yugoslavian opposition groups based in Germany. German police first issued a warrant for Perkovic's arrest in 2005 and a European arrest warrant has also been in force since Croatia joined the EU last year. However, shortly before its accession, Croatia passed a law that blocked extradition of suspected criminals; the law was only changed after Brussels threatened to withhold development funding. Switzerland: Europe's Oldest Houses - The wrecking ball is looming over historic buildings in the town of Schwyz. With land in short supply on Lake Zurich, it's not too hard to get permission to tear down dilapidated buildings. Many historic buildings were never listed, so even houses dating back to the 12th century have been demolished in recent years, leaving historical associations up in arms. The main reason that so many buildings have been razed to the ground is that real estate and property tax is at an all-time low. This has led to a construction boom. Finland: The Caretaker's Legacy - Pukkila is a wealthy municipality thanks to the 30 million euros bequeathed to it by a caretaker who made a fortune buying shares in Nokia. The trouble is, Pukkila isn't allowed to spend it any old how. The fortune may only be invested in the local retirement home. It's now the best-off old folks' home in the world. It had an extension built for 15 million euros and earmarks 250,000 euros a year for special projects - even though it boasts just 24 residents! The rest of Pukkila, meanwhile, is struggling with debt as a result of the Finnish government's austerity measures.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Oct 21, 2014 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Oct 21, 2014 -- 4:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 19, 2014 -- 5:30 AM

Missing Russian Soldiers? (Episode #3241)

KQED World: Sat, Oct 11, 2014 -- 8:30 AM

Russia: Soldiers Missing - Up to 15,000 Russian troops are estimated to be currently deployed in Ukraine. While Moscow denies that any Russian soldiers are fighting in eastern Ukraine, wives and mothers are desperate to know where their loves ones are. Civil rights activists are helping them to either remove their sons to safety, or bury those who have already fallen in the conflict. A cemetery in Pskov is the last resting place of two paratroopers who the authorities claim were killed in an accident. Reporters investigating the story were intimidated and chased away by men in hooded tops. Ukraine has presented captured Russian recruits, but Moscow remains mum when relatives pose requests for information. Italy: Refugee Haven - One year ago several hundred refugees from North Africa drowned when the boat carrying them across the Mediterranean sank off the coast of Lampedusa. The Italian island has come to symbolize a continuing series of refugee tragedies. Governments in Europe are at a loss as to how to deal with the constant stream of migrants, although at least more people are now being saved on the high seas. The Italian navy and the EU's Frontex border security agency picked up over 90,000 seaborne refugees in the space of a year. Most plan to travel further north to Germany, France or Sweden, but the sheer volume of refugees on Lampedusa is putting the island under strain. The days when Lampedusa was known primarily as a tourist destination are long gone. France: Rats Plague Paris - Pest controllers currently have their hands full in Paris, trying to cope with the 10 million rats now living in the city. The explosion in the rodent population is being blamed on construction work. The rats, loathed by tourists and locals alike, have expanded their habitat from the traditional sewers to now include the catacombs too. Paris thrives on its reputation for glamour and is desperate to avoid being associated with a plague of rats - despite the positive PR work done for the species by the animated film "Ratatouille". Greece: Press Freedom - Last year the government shut down state broadcaster ERT at a cost of almost 2,700 jobs. Some 400 journalists refused to accept the austerity measure, however, and continued to broadcast unofficially as a pirate station. The TV and radio producers soon found new premises in Athens. In other cities their colleagues have occupied their former workplaces, but could be evicted any day. The idealists see their message as a vital and critical voice in the Greek media landscape.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Oct 14, 2014 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Oct 14, 2014 -- 4:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 12, 2014 -- 5:30 AM

Episode #3240

KQED World: Sat, Oct 4, 2014 -- 8:30 AM

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Oct 7, 2014 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Oct 7, 2014 -- 4:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 5, 2014 -- 5:30 AM
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