Donate

Infinity Hall Live Previous Broadcasts

The Best of Infinity Hall Live (Episode #113H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Nov 21, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

The Best of Infinity Hall Live - a compilation of the best performances and interviews from the first season of shows.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 22, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Buckwheat Zydeco (Episode #110H)

KQED Life: Sat, Nov 17, 2012 -- 7:00 PM

Emmy and Grammy Award-winning artist Buckwheat Zydeco and his band bring the Creole dance party to Infinity Hall. Born Stanley Joseph Dural, Jr. in 1947, Zydeco was raised in a large, musical family in Lafayette, Louisiana. "Growing up, the thing that made me happy was music," said Zydeco. "When you're listening to music or you're playing music, you got no business being sad." Zydeco's father played the accordion, but the young man originally refused to take up the instrument, dismissing the traditional zydeco music of his father's generation. He preferred playing the organ and listening to R&B. That changed in 1976, when he joined the "King of Zydeco" Clifton Chenier as a keyboard player. After learning to play the accordion, Zydeco formed his own band in 1979. For over three decades, Buckwheat Zydeco has been delighting audiences with his contemporary style of creole music. "It's based on the rhythm and blues. Whether you're playing an up-tempo song or a slow song, they always have that energy and that certain beat that go together with the music. It's always played with the washboard," says Zydeco, who plays the accordion, organ, and sings. Buckwheat Zydeco is an accomplished artist. He won an Emmy for his music in the television movie Pistol Pete: The Life And Times Of Pete Maravich and a Grammy for Best Zydeco Music Album in 2010 for Lay Your Burden Down. Zydeco also played at the closing ceremonies during the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, and performed at both inaugurations for President William Jefferson Clinton. His infectious music appeals to people of all ages. In 2010, Zydeco released his second children's album, Bayou Boogie. Zydeco keeps Louisiana tradition alive with his infectious music, encouraging the audience to boogie to the Buckwheat beat.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sun, Nov 18, 2012 -- 1:00 AM

Dawes (Episode #112H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Nov 14, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

The venue is packed as Los Angeles-based band Dawes takes the stage. Although they could have filled an even larger venue, the intimate atmosphere at Infinity Hall is welcomed by guitarist and lead vocalist Taylor Goldsmith. "I'm pretty sure venues like this are exactly what our music is meant to be played in. No bigger, no smaller. This is exactly perfect," he told the audience after opening with "That Western Skyline" and "The Way You Laugh." With his brother Griffin Goldsmith on drums and vocals, Tay Strathairn on keyboards and vocals, and Wiley Gelber on bass, the foursome's carefully crafted rhythms and tight harmonies have been compared to the Laurel Canyon sound of Crosby, Still and Nash and Neil Young. Taylor commented on Dawes' chemistry both musically and personally. "We're all extremely close," says Taylor. "I don't think this would work if we weren't. A big part of our careers and our time spent playing music is on the road." The band puts an emphasis on its live sound, even turning to traditional methods when recording albums. Strathairn points out that the band records on two-inch tape, laying down an entire track at once rather than recording each part separately. "The performance becomes paramount. We're all in a room, and they say go, and you have to do a whole take of a whole song. We're a live band essentially, and I think that captures us a bit," he says. The group tours extensively and considers its live performances to be its greatest asset. "Music being what it is today, where the value of the record isn't what it was and people could take it for free if they want, the only way to carve out a career for yourself is playing on stage and playing shows and having people come out to the shows. It's always been the best way to spread the word about the band," says Taylor. True to his word, Taylor shows his appreciation for the audience by turning his microphone stand toward the singing crowd as they belt out the chorus line during an inspirational rendition of "When My Time Comes." Dawes closes the show with "Time Spent in Los Angeles," the song they played in June 2011 while performing on The Late Show with David Letterman.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 15, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Rusted Root (Episode #109H)

KQED Life: Sat, Nov 10, 2012 -- 7:00 PM

The Pittsburgh-based fusion band Rusted Root brings their unique percussive jam-rock sound to the historic stage at Infinity Hall. With a highly unique sound, the band has cultivated a loyal following, selling more than 3 million albums worldwide. Originally formed in 1990, the band has been characterized as many things: a jam band, an eclectic collection, a college-radio wonder. Whatever the case, the band has been nothing but popular. With consistently sold-out tours, Rusted Root appears to be garnering the attention of more than just their loyal "Rootheads." Blending world influences from the African, Indian, and Middle Eastern traditions, Rusted Root embodies a percussion-driven rock band with heavy use of tight vocal harmony and pulsing chords. With hit songs like "Send Me on My Way" and "Dance in the Middle," Rusted Root has become an immovable facet in alternative rock.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sun, Nov 11, 2012 -- 1:00 AM

Jonathan Edwards (Episode #111H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Nov 7, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

This program showcases veteran folk singer/songwriter Jonathan Edwards, best known for his 1971 classic "Sunshine." The song - a fierce proclamation of protest and independence set to deceptively upbeat music - became an anthem for numerous young people who opposed the Vietnam War. Today, Edwards seems more comfortable as a laid-back troubadour than a political radical. Often performing on stage barefoot (as he does at Infinity Hall), Edwards demonstrates an expertise with the guitar, mandolin, and accordion to create his own brand of acoustic folk-rock. His heart-felt lyrics and easy-going style continue to please his loyal fans as well as win over new ones. Edwards and his band - Moondi Klein on guitar, Charlie Rose on banjo, Tom Snow on piano and Joe Walsh on mandolin - perform songs primarily from his 2011 album, My Love Will Keep, such as the stunning a cappella rendition of "This Island Earth." But he doesn't disappoint his longtime fans and offers exuberant performances of the classics "Sunshine" and "Shanty," the latter which came to be known as a "Friday song" for many radio stations who would play it every Friday night at 5 to kick off the weekend. "I love playing rooms like this," Edwards says of Infinity Hall. "[It's like] we're playing in a big guitar ...or a Steinway grand piano. It feels like we're inside something like that and the music just vibrates and lives very much in a place like this."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 8, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

The Wailin' Jennys (Episode #108H)

KQED Life: Sat, Nov 3, 2012 -- 7:00 PM

The Wailin' Jennys bring their brand of folk and contemporary roots music to Infinity Hall. Brought together in 2002 for what was supposed to be a one-time coffee house gig in Winnipeg, this award-winning trio soon found their irresistible chemistry and tight vocal harmonies were winning over audiences throughout North America and beyond. Comprised of Nicky Mehta, Ruth Moody, and Heather Masse, The Wailin' Jennys have toured extensively since the release of their eponymously named first studio album in 2003. They've collaborating with a variety of artists and become a fixture as musical guests on public radio's A Prairie Home Companion. Steeped in classical music and art, The Wailin' Jennys have developed a style and sound all their own. With heavy use of acoustic instruments, the group's musical influences range from 70s rock to traditional Celtic folk tunes. Their complexities in style and musical offering only serve to distinguish them further from the rest of the music industry.Having won a Juno Award (Canadian Grammy) in 2005 for their album, 40 Days, The Wailin' Jennys have continued to enjoy success, including their newest album, Bright Morning Stars, released to critical acclaim in the United States and Canada.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sun, Nov 4, 2012 -- 1:00 AM

Buckwheat Zydeco (Episode #110H)

KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 1, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Emmy and Grammy Award-winning artist Buckwheat Zydeco and his band bring the Creole dance party to Infinity Hall. Born Stanley Joseph Dural, Jr. in 1947, Zydeco was raised in a large, musical family in Lafayette, Louisiana. "Growing up, the thing that made me happy was music," said Zydeco. "When you're listening to music or you're playing music, you got no business being sad." Zydeco's father played the accordion, but the young man originally refused to take up the instrument, dismissing the traditional zydeco music of his father's generation. He preferred playing the organ and listening to R&B. That changed in 1976, when he joined the "King of Zydeco" Clifton Chenier as a keyboard player. After learning to play the accordion, Zydeco formed his own band in 1979. For over three decades, Buckwheat Zydeco has been delighting audiences with his contemporary style of creole music. "It's based on the rhythm and blues. Whether you're playing an up-tempo song or a slow song, they always have that energy and that certain beat that go together with the music. It's always played with the washboard," says Zydeco, who plays the accordion, organ, and sings. Buckwheat Zydeco is an accomplished artist. He won an Emmy for his music in the television movie Pistol Pete: The Life And Times Of Pete Maravich and a Grammy for Best Zydeco Music Album in 2010 for Lay Your Burden Down. Zydeco also played at the closing ceremonies during the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, and performed at both inaugurations for President William Jefferson Clinton. His infectious music appeals to people of all ages. In 2010, Zydeco released his second children's album, Bayou Boogie. Zydeco keeps Louisiana tradition alive with his infectious music, encouraging the audience to boogie to the Buckwheat beat.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sun, Nov 18, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too