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Pacific Heartbeat Previous Broadcasts

Hula: The Merrie Monarch's Golden Celebration (Episode #303H)

KQED 9: Wed, May 27, 2015 -- 1:30 PM

This program takes a behind-the-scenes look at preparations for the 50th annual Merrie Monarch Festival in Hilo, Hawaii. The Festival is Hawaii's most significant cultural event and showcases the ancient art of hula for a global audience. This program highlights the hard work, dedication and spirit of the Festival participants.

Papa Mau: The Wayfinder (Episode #103)

KQED World: Sun, May 24, 2015 -- 1:00 AM

In 1974, Hawaiians sailed the traditional voyaging canoe Hokulea from Hawai'i to Tahiti and proved to the world that their ancestors had explored the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean by navigating with the stars. This episode is the story of critical role that master navigator Mau Piailug played in that voyage, and the rebirth of Polynesian unity and pride that followed. The Hokulea was built by members of the newly formed Polynesian Voyaging Society, who dreamed of sailing in the way of their ancestors. Shortly thereafter, a search began for someone who could teach them the art of non-instrument navigation, which had been all but lost until they met Micronesian-born Mau, who agreed to share his knowledge. Follow the remarkable journey of an iconic voyaging canoe and a new generation of Hawaiian navigators who, under the guidance of Papa Mau, revitalized and reclaimed Polynesia's voyaging tradition.

There Once Was An Island - Te Henua E Nnoho (Episode #105)

KQED World: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 2:00 AM

There Once was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho gives a human face to the issue of global climate change. It is the story of a Pacific Island community fighting to preserve what really matters in the face of rising tides. Takuu Atoll is an idyllic home to articulate, educated people who maintain a 1,200-year-old culture and language. The island is disintegrating and when scientists arrive to investigate, residents realize that their attempts to preserve the atoll are making the situation worse. With limited means of communication or outside support, the people of Takuu must make the heart-wrenching decision of whether to risk their safety and remain on their beloved island or become environmental refugees and begin new lives in neighboring, but foreign, Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. There Once Was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho is a sobering expose on climate change and how a community's sense of identity will be lost in the rising tides.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, May 23, 2015 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 8:00 AM

Road to the Globe (Episode #403H)

KQED 9: Wed, May 20, 2015 -- 1:30 PM

In 2010, the home of Shakespeare - The Globe Theatre in London, England - issued a proclamation outlining the world's biggest Shakespearean festival: 36 countries, 36 Shakespearean plays, 36 languages. New Zealand actor Rawiri Paratene answered the call and was given the honor to open the festival. Spanning the twelve-week period before Opening Night, this program follows Rawiri as he forms his own company, Ngakau Toa, consisting of New Zealand's best Maori actors, and their journey as they prepare to take their Maori adaption of William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida to The Globe.

There Once Was An Island - Te Henua E Nnoho (Episode #105)

KQED World: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 12:00 PM

There Once was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho gives a human face to the issue of global climate change. It is the story of a Pacific Island community fighting to preserve what really matters in the face of rising tides. Takuu Atoll is an idyllic home to articulate, educated people who maintain a 1,200-year-old culture and language. The island is disintegrating and when scientists arrive to investigate, residents realize that their attempts to preserve the atoll are making the situation worse. With limited means of communication or outside support, the people of Takuu must make the heart-wrenching decision of whether to risk their safety and remain on their beloved island or become environmental refugees and begin new lives in neighboring, but foreign, Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. There Once Was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho is a sobering expose on climate change and how a community's sense of identity will be lost in the rising tides.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, May 23, 2015 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 8:00 AM

Papa Mau: The Wayfinder (Episode #103)

KQED World: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 11:00 AM

In 1974, Hawaiians sailed the traditional voyaging canoe Hokulea from Hawai'i to Tahiti and proved to the world that their ancestors had explored the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean by navigating with the stars. This episode is the story of critical role that master navigator Mau Piailug played in that voyage, and the rebirth of Polynesian unity and pride that followed. The Hokulea was built by members of the newly formed Polynesian Voyaging Society, who dreamed of sailing in the way of their ancestors. Shortly thereafter, a search began for someone who could teach them the art of non-instrument navigation, which had been all but lost until they met Micronesian-born Mau, who agreed to share his knowledge. Follow the remarkable journey of an iconic voyaging canoe and a new generation of Hawaiian navigators who, under the guidance of Papa Mau, revitalized and reclaimed Polynesia's voyaging tradition.

There Once Was An Island - Te Henua E Nnoho (Episode #105)

KQED World: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 6:00 AM

There Once was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho gives a human face to the issue of global climate change. It is the story of a Pacific Island community fighting to preserve what really matters in the face of rising tides. Takuu Atoll is an idyllic home to articulate, educated people who maintain a 1,200-year-old culture and language. The island is disintegrating and when scientists arrive to investigate, residents realize that their attempts to preserve the atoll are making the situation worse. With limited means of communication or outside support, the people of Takuu must make the heart-wrenching decision of whether to risk their safety and remain on their beloved island or become environmental refugees and begin new lives in neighboring, but foreign, Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. There Once Was an Island - Te Henua e Nnoho is a sobering expose on climate change and how a community's sense of identity will be lost in the rising tides.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, May 23, 2015 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 8:00 AM

Papa Mau: The Wayfinder (Episode #103)

KQED World: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 5:00 AM

In 1974, Hawaiians sailed the traditional voyaging canoe Hokulea from Hawai'i to Tahiti and proved to the world that their ancestors had explored the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean by navigating with the stars. This episode is the story of critical role that master navigator Mau Piailug played in that voyage, and the rebirth of Polynesian unity and pride that followed. The Hokulea was built by members of the newly formed Polynesian Voyaging Society, who dreamed of sailing in the way of their ancestors. Shortly thereafter, a search began for someone who could teach them the art of non-instrument navigation, which had been all but lost until they met Micronesian-born Mau, who agreed to share his knowledge. Follow the remarkable journey of an iconic voyaging canoe and a new generation of Hawaiian navigators who, under the guidance of Papa Mau, revitalized and reclaimed Polynesia's voyaging tradition.

Under A Jarvis Moon (Episode #102H)

KQED World: Sun, May 17, 2015 -- 2:00 PM

Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country.

Road to the Globe (Episode #403H)

KQED Life: Sun, May 17, 2015 -- 4:00 AM

In 2010, the home of Shakespeare - The Globe Theatre in London, England - issued a proclamation outlining the world's biggest Shakespearean festival: 36 countries, 36 Shakespearean plays, 36 languages. New Zealand actor Rawiri Paratene answered the call and was given the honor to open the festival. Spanning the twelve-week period before Opening Night, this program follows Rawiri as he forms his own company, Ngakau Toa, consisting of New Zealand's best Maori actors, and their journey as they prepare to take their Maori adaption of William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida to The Globe.

Under A Jarvis Moon (Episode #102H)

KQED World: Sun, May 17, 2015 -- 1:00 AM

Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country.

Road to the Globe (Episode #403H)

KQED Life: Sat, May 16, 2015 -- 10:00 PM

In 2010, the home of Shakespeare - The Globe Theatre in London, England - issued a proclamation outlining the world's biggest Shakespearean festival: 36 countries, 36 Shakespearean plays, 36 languages. New Zealand actor Rawiri Paratene answered the call and was given the honor to open the festival. Spanning the twelve-week period before Opening Night, this program follows Rawiri as he forms his own company, Ngakau Toa, consisting of New Zealand's best Maori actors, and their journey as they prepare to take their Maori adaption of William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida to The Globe.

The Illness & The Odyssey (Episode #302)

KQED World: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 2:00 AM

A cure for Alzheimer's. A Nobel Prize. An honored place in medical history. All of this hangs in the balance as scientists race to find the cure for a rare disease found on one remote Pacific island. This program tells the story of a deadly, mind-wasting disease that could, potentially, hold the key to solving the riddle of so many other neurological nightmares. It features the renowned neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks and as well as many other luminaries in the field of neuroscience. Based on the book "The Island of the Colorblind" by Dr. Sacks, the film traces the struggle to solve a medical mystery plaguing a native population living on Guam.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 8:00 AM

Under A Jarvis Moon (Episode #102H)

KQED World: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 2:00 AM

Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 8:00 AM

The Illness & The Odyssey (Episode #302)

KQED World: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 12:00 PM

A cure for Alzheimer's. A Nobel Prize. An honored place in medical history. All of this hangs in the balance as scientists race to find the cure for a rare disease found on one remote Pacific island. This program tells the story of a deadly, mind-wasting disease that could, potentially, hold the key to solving the riddle of so many other neurological nightmares. It features the renowned neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks and as well as many other luminaries in the field of neuroscience. Based on the book "The Island of the Colorblind" by Dr. Sacks, the film traces the struggle to solve a medical mystery plaguing a native population living on Guam.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 8:00 AM

Under A Jarvis Moon (Episode #102H)

KQED World: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 11:00 AM

Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 8:00 AM

The Illness & The Odyssey (Episode #302)

KQED World: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 6:00 AM

A cure for Alzheimer's. A Nobel Prize. An honored place in medical history. All of this hangs in the balance as scientists race to find the cure for a rare disease found on one remote Pacific island. This program tells the story of a deadly, mind-wasting disease that could, potentially, hold the key to solving the riddle of so many other neurological nightmares. It features the renowned neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks and as well as many other luminaries in the field of neuroscience. Based on the book "The Island of the Colorblind" by Dr. Sacks, the film traces the struggle to solve a medical mystery plaguing a native population living on Guam.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 8:00 AM

Under A Jarvis Moon (Episode #102H)

KQED World: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 5:00 AM

Under a Jarvis Moon is the story of 130 young men from Hawai'i who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists were Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy. Amazingly, these men (four of whom are still alive) are only now being recognized for their sacrifice, and efforts are underway for the United States to officially acknowledge them for serving their country.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 8:00 AM

Waimea 'ukulele & Slack Key Guitar (Episode #101H)

KQED Life: Sun, May 10, 2015 -- 5:00 AM

This performance documentary provides an insider's peek into the unparalleled talent and camaraderie of the Waimea 'Ukulele and Slack Key Guitar Institute, held annually in the quaint cowboy town of Waimea on Hawai'i Island. During the five-day event, some of the world's finest 'ukulele and slack key guitar artists gather to share their passion for music with aspiring musicians, fans, and one another through one-of-a-kind workshops and rousing concert performances. Featured musicians include Muriel Anderson, Danny Carvalho, Benny Chong, Kalai Ho'opi'i, Richard Ho'opi'i, Bobby Ingano, Ledward Kaapana, Mike Kaawa, David Kamakahi, Dennis Kamakahi, Ozzie Kotani, Sonny Lim, Aaron Mahi, Chino Montero, Cyril Pahinui, and Jeff Peterson.

Na Mele: Jerry Santos (Episode #402H)

KQED Life: Sun, May 10, 2015 -- 4:00 AM

Legendary musician Jerry Santos shares music and thoughts about his home in Hawai'i. Fellow musicians Kamuela Kimokeo and Hoku Zuttermeister accompany Jerry as they perform at his home and in front of backdrops depicting his hometown of Kahaluu, on Windward O'ahu.

Waimea 'ukulele & Slack Key Guitar (Episode #101H)

KQED Life: Sat, May 9, 2015 -- 11:00 PM

This performance documentary provides an insider's peek into the unparalleled talent and camaraderie of the Waimea 'Ukulele and Slack Key Guitar Institute, held annually in the quaint cowboy town of Waimea on Hawai'i Island. During the five-day event, some of the world's finest 'ukulele and slack key guitar artists gather to share their passion for music with aspiring musicians, fans, and one another through one-of-a-kind workshops and rousing concert performances. Featured musicians include Muriel Anderson, Danny Carvalho, Benny Chong, Kalai Ho'opi'i, Richard Ho'opi'i, Bobby Ingano, Ledward Kaapana, Mike Kaawa, David Kamakahi, Dennis Kamakahi, Ozzie Kotani, Sonny Lim, Aaron Mahi, Chino Montero, Cyril Pahinui, and Jeff Peterson.

Na Mele: Jerry Santos (Episode #402H)

KQED Life: Sat, May 9, 2015 -- 10:00 PM

Legendary musician Jerry Santos shares music and thoughts about his home in Hawai'i. Fellow musicians Kamuela Kimokeo and Hoku Zuttermeister accompany Jerry as they perform at his home and in front of backdrops depicting his hometown of Kahaluu, on Windward O'ahu.

Na Loea: The Masters II (Episode #404H)

KQED World: Sat, May 9, 2015 -- 5:00 PM

This program provides a unique window in the lives of those who are considered masters in Hawaiian culture. From sustainable fishing and land management practices, to preserving traditional language and arts, it shares the stories of native Hawaiians who have dedicated their lives to practice, preserve and pass on knowledge and expertise accumulated over years.

Waimea 'ukulele & Slack Key Guitar (Episode #101H)

KQED 9: Wed, May 6, 2015 -- 1:30 PM

This performance documentary provides an insider's peek into the unparalleled talent and camaraderie of the Waimea 'Ukulele and Slack Key Guitar Institute, held annually in the quaint cowboy town of Waimea on Hawai'i Island. During the five-day event, some of the world's finest 'ukulele and slack key guitar artists gather to share their passion for music with aspiring musicians, fans, and one another through one-of-a-kind workshops and rousing concert performances. Featured musicians include Muriel Anderson, Danny Carvalho, Benny Chong, Kalai Ho'opi'i, Richard Ho'opi'i, Bobby Ingano, Ledward Kaapana, Mike Kaawa, David Kamakahi, Dennis Kamakahi, Ozzie Kotani, Sonny Lim, Aaron Mahi, Chino Montero, Cyril Pahinui, and Jeff Peterson.

Pure Caz: Music of the Brothers Cazimero (Episode #301H)

KQED 9: Mon, May 4, 2015 -- 11:00 PM

Legendary musicians Robert and Roland Cazimero of the The Brothers Cazimero perform an enchanting array of original compositions and island standards. Also featured are reflections from the brothers and their friends on their childhood, their illustrious careers, and their perspectives on Hawaiian music from the past to the present.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Tue, May 5, 2015 -- 1:30 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, May 5, 2015 -- 5:00 AM

Na Loea: The Masters II (Episode #404H)

KQED World: Sun, May 3, 2015 -- 7:00 PM

This program provides a unique window in the lives of those who are considered masters in Hawaiian culture. From sustainable fishing and land management practices, to preserving traditional language and arts, it shares the stories of native Hawaiians who have dedicated their lives to practice, preserve and pass on knowledge and expertise accumulated over years.

Na Loea: The Masters (Episode #304)

KQED World: Sat, May 2, 2015 -- 2:00 AM

This program beautifully depicts the lives of those who are considered masters in Hawaiian culture. It includes two stories: Ancestral Ink features Keone Nunes, a kumu hula (teacher of hula) and master of traditional k?kau (tattooing); The Great Heart of Waiok?ne features Ed Wendt, a pioneer in the taro restoration movement who has helped to re-establish the water rights for all traditional farmers in east Maui.

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Friday 3/13

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform more maintenance work overnight, requiring other TV stations to shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Thurs/early Friday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 6am Friday morning. Many receivers will be able to […]

    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Wed 3/11

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform maintenance work overnight, requiring that other TV stations shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Tues/early Wednesday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 5am Wednesday morning. Many receivers will be able to recover […]

    • Thurs 3/05, DT54-1 thru DT54-5: 2 planned, extremely brief Over the Air outages

      (DT54.1 through DT54.5) Our Over the Air signals from our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak (the DT54s) will need to be switched from our Main antenna to our Auxillary antenna while climbers inspect the tower for possible maintenance needs. Once the inspection is done, we will switch back. The two switches will account for two […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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