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Moyers & Company Previous Broadcasts

Rewriting The Story of America (Episode #151H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Dec 28, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

The life and work of Junot Diaz contains many worlds - and that makes him all the more worth listening to. His books, including National Book Award finalist This Is How You Lose Her and Pulitzer Prize-winner The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, journey between the old and the new, and between the America that was and the America we're becoming. Born in the Dominican Republic, but raised in New Jersey and American to the core, Junot Diaz is a spotter of the future, a curator of the past, a man of the here-and-now.
Diaz joins Bill Moyers to discuss the evolution of the great American story. Along the way he offers funny and perceptive insights into his own work, as well Star Wars, Moby Dick, and America's inevitable shift to a majority minority country. "There is an enormous gap between the way the country presents itself and imagines itself and projects itself, and the reality of this country," Diaz tells Bill. "Whether we're talking about the Latino community in North Carolina, a whole new progressive generation of Cuban Americans in Florida, a very out queer community across the United States, or an enormous body of young voters who are either ignored or pandered to, I think we're having a new country emerging that's been in the making for a long time, and that I think for the first time is revealing itself more fully to the entire country."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 31, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 31, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Dec 31, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 30, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 30, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 30, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 30, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 29, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 29, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Dec 29, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

What We Can Learn from Lincoln (Episode #150H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Dec 21, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

One reason so many people are disillusioned by the state of things in America - even more so after the terror in Newtown - is that our political system hasn't produced consistently good results in a long time. We've forgotten that democracy is supposed to be about addressing our problems through a political system that encourages bargaining, compromise, and progress. Except for taking us to war, showering largesse on the privileged and powerful, and courting donors instead of representing voters, Washington politics promotes gridlock, paralysis, and stalemate.
But Bill Moyers points to a new ray of hope - not in politics, but in theaters: the movie Lincoln. This week, Pulitzer Prize-winner Tony Kushner, who wrote the film's screenplay, joins Bill for a "history lesson about politics." The two talk about finding the man inside the monument, and what Abraham Lincoln - 147 years after his death - can still teach us all about politics, compromise, and the survival of American democracy.
"The job of the president is both to make the compromises necessary to actually have things happen in a democracy, which means compromising at a slower pace than anybody would necessarily like," Kushner tells Bill. "At the same time he has to keep telling us where we're going, what we're trying to arrive at. And I think that Obama has done an astonishing job of doing that over and over, of reminding us that government is a good thing, and that we share responsibility for one another because without that shared responsibility our own lives are destroyed."
"You will be reminded that politics can be made to work for the good of the country," says Bill of the show. "It could even help us reduce the violence in America and make more Newtown tragedies less likely."
Also on the show, Bill reflects on the elementary school shooting in Connecticut and its implications for our culture.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Dec 26, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Dec 25, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 24, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 24, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 24, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Dec 24, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 23, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Dec 23, 2012 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 23, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 23, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 23, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 23, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Dec 22, 2012 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 22, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 22, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Dec 22, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Fiscal Cliffs and Fiscal Realities (Episode #149H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Dec 14, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

* When it comes to America's economic health, all anyone seems to talk about is the "fiscal cliff," and the perils of our inevitable plunge. But media's favorite metaphor is distracting us from actual and crucial fiscal realities. This week, independent political and economic analysts Bruce Bartlett and Yves Smith join Bill in a discussion that's become as rare as it is necessary - why are Washington insiders talking about the deficit crisis and not the jobs crisis?
Bartlett, former advisor to Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, got into hot water with fellow conservatives when he aired concerns about the direction of their ideology and wrote critically of the second George Bush. His most recent book is The Benefit and The Burden: Tax Reform - Why We Need It, and What It Will Take. Yves Smith, who spent more than 25 years in the financial services industry, is the founder and editor of the popular blog Naked Capitalism, and runs a successful management consulting firm.< br />* Following the conversation, Bill shares his perspective on one of the most corrupt D.C. fixtures - the revolving door between Washington leadership and lobbying. That lucrative pathway ensures that "when push comes to shove, corporate interests will have the upper hand in the close calls that determine public policy... no matter which party is in power."
* Finally on the broadcast, poet and former publishing executive James Autry joins Bill to talk about issues of art and of heart. He shares his poems with Bill and discusses his and his wife Sally's challenging but inspiring experience raising their autistic child.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Dec 19, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Dec 18, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 17, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 17, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 17, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Dec 17, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 16, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Dec 16, 2012 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 16, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 16, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 16, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 16, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 15, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 15, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Dec 15, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Big Media's Power Play (Episode #148H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Dec 7, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

* In 1983, 50 corporations controlled a majority of American media. Now that number is 6. And Big Media may get even bigger, thanks to the FCC's consideration of ending a rule preventing companies from owning a newspaper and radio and TV stations in the same big city. Such a move would give these massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition, control the public message, and also limit diversity across the media landscape. On this week's Moyers & Company, Senator Bernie Sanders, one of several Senators who have written FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski asking him to suspend the plan, joins Bill to discuss why Big Media is a threat to democracy and what citizens can do to fight back.
* Also on the show, former Republican Congressman Mickey Edwards shares his perspective on the fiscal cliff debate, the influence of tax pledger Grover Norquist, and why both political parties require radical change. Edwards chaired the Republican Policy Committee, was a founding trustee of the conservative Heritage Foundation, and served as National Chairman of the American Conservative Union.
* Finally, Bill Moyers offers his own perspective on why there's more to Norquist's unusual pledge than ideology or principle.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Dec 12, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Dec 11, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 10, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 10, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 10, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Dec 10, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 9, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Dec 9, 2012 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 9, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 9, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 9, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 9, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Dec 8, 2012 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 8, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 8, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Dec 8, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

United States of ALEC (Episode #147H)

KQED Plus: Sat, Dec 1, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

* In an encore broadcast, Moyers & Company presents a report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of America has never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense without public knowledge.
In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it. One Wisconsin politician describes ALEC as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests."
"United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions, LLC and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs including the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.< br />* Also re-airing is Bill's conversation with Philip Appleman, whose creativity spans a long life filled with poetry, fiction, philosophy, and religion. A scholar of Charles Darwin, Appleman edited the critical anthology Darwin, and wrote the poetry books Darwin's Ark and Darwin's Bestiary. Appleman's latest poetry collection is Perfidious Proverbs.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Dec 5, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Dec 4, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 3, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 3, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Dec 3, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Dec 3, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 2, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 2, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 2, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 2, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Dec 2, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 1, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Dec 1, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
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      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

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