Donate

Moyers & Company Previous Broadcasts

What Did The Debates Tell Us? (Episode #142H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Oct 26, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

* Four debates have come and gone, and in the aftermath of the pomp, points, and politics, what have we learned? And how has democracy been served? This week, two of the country's most astute political media observers - Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Marty Kaplan - join Bill to weigh in on the rhetoric and realities of two campaigns now in the home stretch, looking to make their cases by any means affordable. Jamieson is director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and the driving force behind the acclaimed online watchdog FactCheck.org. Marty Kaplan is the founding director of the Norman Lear Center at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
* Bill is later joined by Neil Barofsky, who held the thankless job of special inspector general in charge of policing TARP, the bailout's Troubled Asset and Relief Plan. Between President Obama's ineffectual proposals and Mitt Romney's loving embrace, bankers have little to fear from either administration, and that leaves the rest of America on perilously thin economic ice. Barofsky discusses the critical yet unmet need to tackle banking reform and avoid another financial meltdown. Currently a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the New York University School of Law, Barofsky is the author of Bailout: An Inside Account of How Washington Abandoned Main Street While Rescuing Wall Street.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Oct 31, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Oct 30, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 29, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 29, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 29, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Oct 29, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 28, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Oct 28, 2012 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 28, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 28, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 28, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 27, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 27, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Oct 27, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Plutocracy Rising (Episode #141H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Oct 19, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

The One Percent is not only increasing their share of wealth - they're using it to spread millions among political candidates who serve their interests. Example: Goldman Sachs, which gave more money than any other major American corporation to Barack Obama in 2008, is switching alliances this year; their employees have given $900,000 both to Mitt Romney's campaign and to the pro-Romney super PAC Restore Our Future. Why? Because, says the Wall Street Journal, the Goldman Sachs gang felt betrayed by President Obama's modest attempts at financial reform.
But even more audacious than opening your wallet to trade cash for influence is strong-arming your employees to vote as you say. Such intimidation is out in the open, from the Murray Energy CEO who reportedly made his workers spend unpaid time at a pro-Romney rally; to David and Charles Koch, who sent anti-Obama and pro-Romney materials to the 45,000 employees of their subsidiary Georgia Pacific; to ASG Solutions boss Arthur Allen, who sent an intimidating email to his employees.
This week Bill is joined by two veteran journalists to discuss how the super-rich have willfully confused their self-interest with America's interest. Guests are Chrystia Freeland, author of the new book Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else; and Rolling Stone magazine's Matt Taibbi, who regularly shines his spotlight on scandals involving big business and government.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Oct 24, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Oct 23, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 22, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 22, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 22, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Oct 22, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 21, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 21, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 21, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 21, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Oct 20, 2012 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 20, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 20, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Oct 20, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Justice Not Politics (Episode #140H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Oct 12, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

* This week, James Balog, one of the world's premier cinema-photographers, explains how "the earth is having a fever." At tremendous risk to his own safety, Balog has been documenting the erosion of glaciers in Switzerland, Greenland, Iceland, and Alaska. He joins Bill to share his photos and discoveries, describing his process and transformation from climate change skeptic to true believer. Balog's soon-to-be-released film, Chasing Ice, is a breathtaking account of climate change in action.
* Afterward, Bill explores a judicial system under partisan attack. 38 states now elect their high court judges. Over the last decade, $200 million - much of it secret and tied to partisan agendas - has been pouring into these judicial campaigns. In Florida, Pennsylvania, and Iowa, for example, justices are being targeted by radical groups that abhor judicial independence and want the courts to reflect their own political biases.
In Iowa, a state whose judicial system has been praised for its fairness and impartiality, the political and religious Right ousted 3 justices in 2010 over marriage equality, and is now trying to take down a fourth over the same issue. But this time a bipartisan coalition called Justice Not Politics is fighting back. Its co-founders - Democrat Sally Pederson and Republican Joy Corning, each of whom served Iowa for 8 years as lieutenant governor - talk with Bill about what's at stake when justices are at the mercy of partisan passions and money in politics.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 15, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 15, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 15, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Oct 15, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 14, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Oct 14, 2012 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 14, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 14, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 14, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 13, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 13, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Oct 13, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Hispanic America's Turn (Episode #139H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Oct 5, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

According to the 2010 census, the number of American Hispanics grew 43% in the last decade to over 50 million. By 2050, Hispanics are projected to number 132 million and represent 30% of the population. As that population evolves, so does their political power. A new report by the Pew Hispanic Center shows that since 2008, America's Latino voting population has grown 22% since 2008. But what are the cultural and political implications of these now well-understood statistics?
This week, Bill goes beyond the numbers with two of our nation's most popular and influential journalists: Univision's Jorge Ramos and Maria Elena Salinas. Univision, a Spanish-language US television network, has the largest audience of Spanish-language television viewers, according to Nielsen ratings.
Ramos, says The Washington Monthly, is "the broadcaster who will most determine the 2012 elections," while The New York Times calls Salinas "the voice of Hispanic America." In a candid and comprehensive discussion, Ramos and Salinas discuss their responsibilities both as reporters and representatives of their culture, their aggressive journalistic approaches to both President Obama and Governor Romney, and their strong takes on immigration issues that mean so much to a potentially decisive voting bloc in 2012.
"We are changing the face of America. It's not black and white anymore. We're changing the way we eat. We're changing the way people dance, the way people speak. And we're changing the way people vote." Ramos tells Bill. "No one can make it the White House now without the Hispanic vote - that's completely new."
This year, Ramos and Salinas received the Lifetime Achievement Emmy Award - the first Hispanics ever to earn the honor.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Oct 10, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Oct 9, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 8, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 8, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 8, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Oct 8, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 7, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Oct 7, 2012 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 7, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 7, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 7, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Oct 6, 2012 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 6, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 6, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Oct 6, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

United States of ALEC (Episode #138H)

KQED Plus: Mon, Oct 1, 2012 -- 12:00 AM

* This week, an unprecedented in-depth report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense. Using interviews, documents, and personal accounts, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests."
In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it. "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," said Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
"United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs such as the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
* Also appearing on the broadcast is Kathleen Hall Jamieson, the director of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Public Policy Center and founder of FactCheck.org, who talks about deception and truth in the 2012 campaign.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Oct 3, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Oct 2, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 1, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 1, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Oct 1, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too